Training for a marathon while building muscle

  • muscleboundfe...

    Posts: 392

    Nov 01, 2014 12:11 AM GMT
    Can anyone point me in the direction of any information that would help me train for a marathon while building muscle. I would love run the Disney marathon January 2016. I also want to become more muscular. I'm not looking to be huge. I know that will take years of dedication. However the last thing I will ever want to be is skinny.
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Nov 02, 2014 3:19 PM GMT
    Well first let me say I'm no expert, but I'd suggest that (if you haven't done so), you need to be evaluated by your doctor and a couple of trainers who can see and talk to you in detail so you can get accurate information. Above all, seek out multiple sources of information.

    You need to be careful about seeking out "multiple" goals at once. In another thread you were talking about weight loss and perceptions, now muscle gain and training for a marathon. One can work on multiple goals, but you have to be careful or you can end up gaining nothing but frustration.

    Understand any single goals can require a major change in nutrition focus and lifestyle. To emphasize more than one goal can be tough, so my thoughts are that you seek information from experts first, with these ideas in mind, but be flexible enough to adjust your final goals. Good luck, if you are determined, you certainly can attain anything you want!
  • muscleboundfe...

    Posts: 392

    Nov 02, 2014 6:32 PM GMT
    HndsmKansan saidWell first let me say I'm no expert, but I'd suggest that (if you haven't done so), you need to be evaluated by your doctor and a couple of trainers who can see and talk to you in detail so you can get accurate information. Above all, seek out multiple sources of information.

    You need to be careful about seeking out "multiple" goals at once. In another thread you were talking about weight loss and perceptions, now muscle gain and training for a marathon. One can work on multiple goals, but you have to be careful or you can end up gaining nothing but frustration.

    Understand any single goals can require a major change in nutrition focus and lifestyle. To emphasize more than one goal can be tough, so my thoughts are that you seek information from experts first, with these ideas in mind, but be flexible enough to adjust your final goals. Good luck, if you are determined, you certainly can attain anything you want!


    Lol you're definitely the appeal to authority guy. I've decided to train for a half instead. I understand where you are coming from when it comes to multiple goals but disagree. For some people multiple goals is very beneficial. Having multiple goals allows me to change my definition of success when I feel stalled. Example if I'm not loosing weight but the weights are going up in the gym then I can use that as a positive motivator. Also one of the goals you mentioned, perception, is not a goal for me. Its an observation that I can not directly control. Weight loss and a cardio goal tend to go hand in hand so they are competing goals they are complementary goals.
  • Bowyn_Aerrow

    Posts: 357

    Nov 02, 2014 8:56 PM GMT
    Mind I personally never trained for anything...

    However having been in relationships with guys who took the whole training thing to various levels of seriousness, and having been a gym mouse (I went along to offer moral support and to be a 'spotter') I did pick up that the ends determines what it is one does in the gym.

    Mass building exercises and 'toning' exercises use two different mass of weight in order to work the two primary different forms of muscle.

    The two broad types of skeletal muscle are slow twitch and fast twitch.

    Fast twitch gives ones explosive strength, say the ability to heft a lot of mass once. This form of muscle tends to grow a bit bulkier than slow twitch muscle. Thus Mass training is high weight and low reps to work those fast twitch muscles.

    Slow Twitch muscles tend to be 'weaker' in that they do not lift as much mass, but they have endurance, able to lift a little weight over and over again. They also are not as thick as the fast twitch muscles, which leads to being able to cut and define visible muscle.

    You need fast twitch muscles to throw something a distance. or to lift a heavy mass once, or twice.

    You need slow twitch muscles to run marathons, to do repetitive muscle movement over and over again.

    Most body-builders who take the whole subject seriously, break up their year into 'seasons'. One season they lift heavy weight, low reps and sets (mass building) the next season they lift lighter weight, higher reps higher sets for cut and definition and a bit more endurance.

    In the case of marathon runners, the 'ideal' is to have a compact low weight body, your muscles are worked far more on the slow twitch side of things, thus you will not heap on extra pounds. This allows you to run further and longer.

    The 'seasons' method also does other things, such as it prevents plateauing (stagnation), lends it self to improved core strength, gives the person real strength, as compared to 'weak muscles' which are all show. It also improves the cardiovascular system.

    This method also helps in burning intramuscular fat. As you may know there are three basic forms of fat, subdural (the fat right under the skin), intramuscular (look at a steak, that white and red marbled appearance is fat inside of muscle) and organ fat. Low weight, high reps/sets tends to burn more of the fat as it requires more energy over a longer period of time to reach failure of the muscle (feel the burn type failure).

    You may want to seriously consider taking your program more toward defining and endurance training for now. This will work to your advantage later down the road, and have immediate benefits, such as allowing you to have better control of free weights which leads to reduction in sports injuries.

    I also suggest more cardio as you are going to need a strong heart and lung capacity to run a marathon.

    I doubt you will lose much mass in the course of a year. you most likely will see a shift of where your mass is, as in more muscle mass and less fat mass as you build muscle and burn fat. I doubt you will end up 'skinny' doing a low weight/high rep/set routine.

    Mind every marathon program does require you run/jog and build up the right leg muscles to run effectively and efficiently for long periods of time. Again its the fast twitch Vs Slow twitch muscle.
  • muscleboundfe...

    Posts: 392

    Nov 03, 2014 1:59 AM GMT
    Bowyn_Aerrow saidMind I personally never trained for anything...

    However having been in relationships with guys who took the whole training thing to various levels of seriousness, and having been a gym mouse (I went along to offer moral support and to be a 'spotter') I did pick up that the ends determines what it is one does in the gym.

    Mass building exercises and 'toning' exercises use two different mass of weight in order to work the two primary different forms of muscle.

    The two broad types of skeletal muscle are slow twitch and fast twitch.

    Fast twitch gives ones explosive strength, say the ability to heft a lot of mass once. This form of muscle tends to grow a bit bulkier than slow twitch muscle. Thus Mass training is high weight and low reps to work those fast twitch muscles.

    Slow Twitch muscles tend to be 'weaker' in that they do not lift as much mass, but they have endurance, able to lift a little weight over and over again. They also are not as thick as the fast twitch muscles, which leads to being able to cut and define visible muscle.

    You need fast twitch muscles to throw something a distance. or to lift a heavy mass once, or twice.

    You need slow twitch muscles to run marathons, to do repetitive muscle movement over and over again.

    Most body-builders who take the whole subject seriously, break up their year into 'seasons'. One season they lift heavy weight, low reps and sets (mass building) the next season they lift lighter weight, higher reps higher sets for cut and definition and a bit more endurance.

    In the case of marathon runners, the 'ideal' is to have a compact low weight body, your muscles are worked far more on the slow twitch side of things, thus you will not heap on extra pounds. This allows you to run further and longer.

    The 'seasons' method also does other things, such as it prevents plateauing (stagnation), lends it self to improved core strength, gives the person real strength, as compared to 'weak muscles' which are all show. It also improves the cardiovascular system.

    This method also helps in burning intramuscular fat. As you may know there are three basic forms of fat, subdural (the fat right under the skin), intramuscular (look at a steak, that white and red marbled appearance is fat inside of muscle) and organ fat. Low weight, high reps/sets tends to burn more of the fat as it requires more energy over a longer period of time to reach failure of the muscle (feel the burn type failure).

    You may want to seriously consider taking your program more toward defining and endurance training for now. This will work to your advantage later down the road, and have immediate benefits, such as allowing you to have better control of free weights which leads to reduction in sports injuries.

    I also suggest more cardio as you are going to need a strong heart and lung capacity to run a marathon.

    I doubt you will lose much mass in the course of a year. you most likely will see a shift of where your mass is, as in more muscle mass and less fat mass as you build muscle and burn fat. I doubt you will end up 'skinny' doing a low weight/high rep/set routine.

    Mind every marathon program does require you run/jog and build up the right leg muscles to run effectively and efficiently for long periods of time. Again its the fast twitch Vs Slow twitch muscle.


    Wow thanks for the advice. I'll keep that in mind as I do more research. I've never heard of a gym mouse before though. Sounds sad since rats kill and eat mice.
  • Bowyn_Aerrow

    Posts: 357

    Nov 03, 2014 3:21 AM GMT
    muscleboundfem said

    Wow thanks for the advice. I'll keep that in mind as I do more research. I've never heard of a gym mouse before though. Sounds sad since rats kill and eat mice.


    Your welcome.

    And I fear your analogy of rats and mice kinda hit the nail on the head but in a nice being eaten sort of way. icon_wink.gif