Is there a real difference between organic and conventional teas?

  • infinitefrien...

    Posts: 376

    Nov 04, 2014 9:17 PM GMT
    I've been looking for answer...
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    Nov 04, 2014 10:31 PM GMT
    Price. And marketing.

    That's it. There is no added health benefit to organic anything.
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Nov 04, 2014 10:44 PM GMT
    With my recorded webradio fitness program, our show #23 of the season is a discussion about "organic vs fresh" and I interview the manager of "Whole Foods" in Wichita and then have one our our regular registered dietican commentators speak about it. the gist, Organic costs a lot of money and there can be a smarter way....
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    Nov 04, 2014 11:15 PM GMT
    No.

    I mean as long as you can't taste the difference it doesn't really matter, does it?
  • Amelorn

    Posts: 231

    Nov 05, 2014 12:11 AM GMT
    It depends. I've noticed that many organic processed foods (tea would count as processed) tend to be "better" than their conventional counterparts.

    Organic tea is no different. Tea can vary in taste and price as much as wine can. Anyone who has been around East and South East Asia will probably attest to this. In a bag, the tea leaves can present in three ways: small particles of "dust", chopped, or whole/nearly whole leaves. The dust is the lowest quality (worst flavour, very stale tasting) while whole leaves are generally the finest (rich and floral taste). It's very rare to see organic tea "dust" bagged and sold.
  • Bowyn_Aerrow

    Posts: 357

    Nov 05, 2014 12:25 AM GMT
    Aside from trace pesticides, herbicides and fertilizers on the tea leaf. No there is no way a human being can detect a difference.

    Even with the use of 'cides' Organic labeling allows many of the pesticides, herbicides and fertilizers that 'conventional' growers use.

    The laws are such that they pretty much do little to make a crop really 'organic' over 'traditional'.

    True organic farming will rely on non-man-made chemicals (which pretty much means not-petroleum based). Few large companies both with that, they use petrol-chemicals, just ones that the government has deemed 'safer' than petrol chemicals.

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    Nov 05, 2014 12:34 AM GMT
    If you eat only organic foods your anus will return to its natural pink color instead of that unsightly and repulsive brown color.
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    Nov 05, 2014 2:06 AM GMT
    How do yo u even know that
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    Nov 05, 2014 3:12 AM GMT
    I prefer a strong English/Irish breakfast type tea. Five Roses, from RSA, is one of the best; Twinings will do in a pinch, but forget anything Celestial, as good tea is a down to earth brew. And, brew it up strong!
  • Teth1

    Posts: 39

    Nov 05, 2014 4:20 AM GMT
    HndsmKansan saidWith my recorded webradio fitness program, our show #23 of the season is a discussion about "organic vs fresh" and I interview the manager of "Whole Foods" in Wichita and then have one our our regular registered dietican commentators speak about it. the gist, Organic costs a lot of money and there can be a smarter way....


    Organic vs "fresh"? Organic and conventional can both be fresh, whereas "conventionally grown" means not organic.

    "But the group found a significant difference in the levels of special compounds called antioxidants. "Across the important antioxidant compounds in fruits and vegetables, organic fruits and vegetables deliver between 20 and 40 percent higher antioxidant activity," says Charles Benbrook, from Washington State University's Center for Sustaining Agriculture and Natural Resources, a co-author of the study".

    http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2014/07/11/330760923/are-organic-vegetables-more-nutritious-after-all

    And that's a recent study.
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    Nov 05, 2014 5:47 AM GMT
    HndsmKansan saidWith my recorded webradio fitness program, our show #23 of the season is a discussion about "organic vs fresh" and I interview the manager of "Whole Foods" in Wichita and then have one our our regular registered dietican commentators speak about it. the gist, Organic costs a lot of money and there can be a smarter way....


    Okay, I'll bite. What smarter way can there be...?
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    Nov 05, 2014 6:45 AM GMT
    Uh, "organic" is in contrast to "inorganic". An organic compound is one which contains and is based on carbon atoms for its structure. All biological plants and animals are organic, as all biochemistry is based on organic compounds. Inorganic compounds those which are non-carbon based, as for a common example, table salt (sodium chloride). Thus, any plant or animal product found in a grocery story is "organic," making rather ridiculous the whole idea of calling food items grown without pesticides as "organic," because they are inherently organic however they are grown.

  • Nov 05, 2014 8:17 AM GMT
    An organic tea is an original insult that you drop on someone you don't like. It's very personal, and it's never been used on anyone else before.

    A conventional tea is the boring criticism everyone uses. Ugh.
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    Nov 05, 2014 4:38 PM GMT
    ^
    Clever. I thought an organic tea was an insult fostered organically from the natural flow of events, not forced, contrived or manipulated.
  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4435

    Nov 05, 2014 8:31 PM GMT
    teth1 said
    HndsmKansan saidWith my recorded webradio fitness program, our show #23 of the season is a discussion about "organic vs fresh" and I interview the manager of "Whole Foods" in Wichita and then have one our our regular registered dietican commentators speak about it. the gist, Organic costs a lot of money and there can be a smarter way....


    Organic vs "fresh"? Organic and conventional can both be fresh, whereas "conventionally grown" means not organic.

    "But the group found a significant difference in the levels of special compounds called antioxidants. "Across the important antioxidant compounds in fruits and vegetables, organic fruits and vegetables deliver between 20 and 40 percent higher antioxidant activity," says Charles Benbrook, from Washington State University's Center for Sustaining Agriculture and Natural Resources, a co-author of the study".

    http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2014/07/11/330760923/are-organic-vegetables-more-nutritious-after-all

    And that's a recent study.

    I wonder if that's because organic foods grow at a slower rate, spend more time in the sun, soak up more nutrients from the soil. I assume non-organic fertilizers are used to speed up crop growth. Anyone know?