The massive Republican midterm victory: control of Senates, Houses - State and Federal

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    Nov 08, 2014 11:23 PM GMT
    A list of the consolidated results that aren't covered in other threads. This was a remarkable set of elections.

    (1) US Senate:
    > The Republicans have a majority in the Senate at 54-46,
    > Lousiana's Mary Landrieu (D) lost - Republicans hold every Senate seat in the South outside Florida and Virginia, each of which elected a Democrat in 2012.
    > In 2016, Republicans will be defending 24 seats as compared to just 10 for Democrats

    (2) While eyes were on the senate, this is what the 114th Congress looks:
    ?controllerName=image&action=get&id=4272
    > Republicans now hold 243-178 seats, with 14 seats undetermined
    > Republicans have already exceeded the 242 seats they won in 2010
    > close to their postwar high of 246 seats in 1946 (if they beat this, it will be their biggest majority since 1929-31, when they held 270 seats)

    (3) Governors races (important for local organization and districting for future elections):
    > of 36 states, Republicans won/lead 26 of them
    > of 14 toss-up races, Democrats won/lead two
    > significant Republican inroads into reliably blue states
    > wins include Massachusetts, Illinois, Arkasas, and Maryland, Colorado, Wisconsin
    > won Maryland, with only 900,000 registered Republicans and more than 2m registered Democrats

    (4) At the state level, Democrats have sunk to “pre-Great Depression levels”
    2014-elections.jpg
    > Lone bright spot for Democrats was holding majorities in Iowa Senate and Kentucky House
    > Divided state governments will increase with changes in governor in places such as Massachussets, Illinois, Pennsylvania and Maryland along with the legislatures in West Virginia, Minnesota and New York
    > New Mexico gave Republicans control of state House for first time since 1952

    (5) Minorities:
    > Republicans made significant inroads with visible minorities
    > Utah's Mia Love became the first black female republican to be elected to House
    > South Carolina's Senator Tim Scott, first elected black senator since Reconstruction
    > Republican Elise Stefanik, 30 became youngest woman ever elected to Congress
    > Republicans attracted 10% of blacks, 35% of Latinos and 49% of Asian-Americans.
    > Comparable figures in the 2012 presidential race were 6%, 27% and 26% (NYT)

    This was more than a message to the Obama Administration. Despite claims leading up to the election that Obamacare would help, and not hurt Democrats - this is what influenced voters (Edison Research):
    10649071_10152900888183128_7964659385063

    On ballot measures, environmental groups and labor groups were significant losers but several themes emerge:

    (1) The Democrats' "War on Women" failed:
    > Wendy Davis was trounced by 20% in Texas governor's race, lost women's vote by 5%
    > Wendy Davis's Senate seat was won by Republican tea partier Konni Burton
    > Democrats outpolled Republicans among women, 52% to 47%
    > Republicans’ advantage among men was 56% to 42%
    > Republicans did better among voters over 45 and Democrats among those under 45, but Republicans still managed 43% of the under-30 vote
    > Sandra Fluke who campaigned to have others pay for her birth control lost by 22 points

    (2) Support for increasing minimum wages (silver lining for "progressives"):
    10153862_10152901637623128_1257341160258
    > 5 states voted to increase minimum wage over the next few years

    (3) No to GMO labelling:
    > Voters in Oregon and Colorado say no to costly, useless food labels
    > Hawaii’s Maui County voted to impose an indefinite ban on planting GMO crops there. The ban passed by a slim margin (50.2%). Dow AgriSciences indicated the company intends to sue Maui

    (4) A mixed message on Fat/soda taxes:
    > voters in San Francisco rejected a soda tax (surprising!)
    > Berkeley voted to enact soda tax

    (5) Climate change:
    > Billionaire and Democrat Tom Steyer spent $74 million trying to persuade voters to oppose Republicans who disagree with him on climate change
    > Coal-supporting Shelley Moore Capito became the first GOP Senator in 55 years from West Virginia
    > In Kentucky Mitch McConnell won making “war on coal” the centerpiece of his campaign

    (6) Public unions are very vulnerable:
    > victories by Scott Walker in Wisconsin, Rick Snyder in Michigan and Rick Scott in Florida - all of whom campaigned against public unions
    > Republican Bruce Rauner, the private-equity manager defeated incumbent Pat Quinn and the Democrat-public union alliance in Illinois

    (7) School reform/teachers unions:
    > Teachers unions spent more than $100 million trying to elect their allies
    > Rare silver lining for the unions was California State Superintendent Tom Torlakson ’s slender victory over school reformer Marshall Tuck, a fellow Democrat and former head of the nonprofit Los Angeles-based Green Dot charter schools
    > American Federation for Children, which supports private-school scholarships, elected all 13 of its legislative candidates in Alabama despite being outspent by the state teachers union 27-to-1
    > In Tennessee, the pro-school-choice outfit toppled Democratic state Rep. Gloria Johnson, a teachers-union favorite
    > A pro-charter group defenestrated three Democratic state senators in New York, giving Republicans control of the upper chamber
    > In Illinois, Republican Governor-elect Rauner personally financed some of Chicago’s highest-performing charter schools and campaigned to reform teacher tenure, lift the cap on charters and introduce private-school scholarships for poor children

    (8.) Common Core supporters lost consistently:
    > Richard Woods, who will become Georgia’s new state superintendent, also campaigned on an anti-Common Core platform and has pledged to work to create Georgia-based curriculum standards.
    > In South Carolina, which withdrew from Common Core earlier this year and already has planned to write its own standards, Molly Spearman, an anti-Common Core candidate, won her bid for state superintendent.
    > The Senate now has several potential Republican presidential contenders who all oppose Common Core, including Rand Paul, Ted Cruz, and Marco Rubio
    > New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo did manage to defeat his Core-trashing opponent, but only after the governor released an ad promising to delay counting Core-aligned testing until New Yorkers were ready for it

    (9) Marijuana:
    > Even in Florida, where a medical marijuana initiative fell two points short of the supermajority needed to approve a constitutional amendment, 58 percent of voters agreed that patients should be allowed to use cannabis for symptom relief
    > number of states that have approved marijuana legalization doubled
    > Alaska became fourth state to legalize

    (10) Gun rights:
    > In Alabama, by a vote of 73 percent to 27 percent, voters revised state constitution to provide greater legal protections for the right to keep and bear arms
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    Nov 09, 2014 3:19 PM GMT
    More on the failed Democratic War on Women attack:
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/george-will-mark-udalls-overheated-war-on-women-in-colorado-senate-race/2014/10/17/84506456-5562-11e4-ba4b-f6333e2c0453_story.html

    Is the biggest loser Hillary Clinton?
    http://freebeacon.com/columns/the-biggest-loser/HTTP ADDRESS GOES HERE

    Campaign spending - including a number of races where Democrats lost despite spending significantly more:
    https://www.opensecrets.org/overview/

    Top contributors over time?
    Not the Koch brothers @ #42, but ActBlue - a democratic PAC + 2 union groups take up top 3 spots:
    https://www.opensecrets.org/orgs/list.php
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Nov 09, 2014 3:26 PM GMT
    Sucks to be gay, or a minority, or a single female, or a teacher, or middle class, or the planet earth right now.

    This is only a win for the oil industry.icon_sad.gif
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    Nov 09, 2014 3:29 PM GMT
    HottJoe saidSucks to be gay, or a minority, or a single female, or a teacher, or middle class, or the planet earth right now.

    This is only a win for the oil industry.icon_sad.gif


    Except that's not what the results suggest. In your world view perhaps though. In fact, there's a greater recognition at least amongst single females, minorities and the middle class that jobs are a better path to wealth than handouts.

    Further, for teachers, at least some teachers are going to be given the opportunity to perform and excel, and be compensated for it through school choice.

    The environment will also win through the greater usage of natural gas which reduces greenhouse emissions substantially and will be a bridge to something even more sustainable.

    And oh by the way, the US isn't the world though the idea of economic liberty is spreading. Look at France's failed government whose policies you would like the US to adopt.
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    Nov 09, 2014 3:33 PM GMT
    More on campaign finance:
    http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/392238/big-midterm-spending-didnt-pay-dems-ian-tuttle
    The biannual reminder that politics is expensive business usually provokes a predictable excess of Democratic cries to “get the money out of politics!” Harry Reid, soon-to-be-ex-majority leader, has spent the last year sputtering without end about the Koch brothers. But as Democrats point fingers for Tuesday’s coast-to-coast losses, they have been conspicuously quiet about this election’s outlays.

    And make no mistake, a lot of money changed hands this election cycle: a cool $4 billion, give or take — more than in any past midterm. This cycle also saw the first $100 million Senate race, in North Carolina. But in 2014, Democrats cannot blame Citizens United for their electoral woes.

    Consider North Carolina. Democratic incumbent Kay Hagan outspent her opponent, Republican Thom Tillis, by more than $14 million, or almost three to one, according to Federal Election Commission figures reported by the Center for Responsive Politics. Outside spending helped to reduce that gap, but it did not eliminate it. Including party committees, outside groups spent $6.5 million supporting Hagan and $35.6 million attacking Tillis; other outside groups spent $13.8 supporting Tillis and $20.9 million attacking Hagan. Recognizing that spending against Republicans is not necessarily advertisement in favor of Democrats, and that that money is used for a variety of purposes, it is still the case that pro-Hagan/anti-Tillis groups outspent their counterparts by more than $7 million.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Nov 09, 2014 3:52 PM GMT
    riddler78 said
    HottJoe saidSucks to be gay, or a minority, or a single female, or a teacher, or middle class, or the planet earth right now.

    This is only a win for the oil industry.icon_sad.gif


    Except that's not what the results suggest. In your world view perhaps though.

    The results suggest that the lies the republicans run on have taken hold with some people in this election... It probably helps their cause to stick it to the teachers, just to keep the electorate less educated and playing into the hands of fear mongering.

    It's all a bait and switch game. They attract Latinos without budging on the number one issue latino families face, which is immigration, and all the profiling involved in immigration enforcement, by promising them conservative policies that take rights away from others.

    You say they are against handouts, but the white middle class of 1950 which is still alive today had their status handed to them on a silver platter. Republicans have tricked people into thinking the middle class just happened all its own, without government assistance, and that's a lie. Democrats made the middle class, with strong unions etc. Unfortunately, both parties were only serving white people back then. It's the stain of racism that persists today and is the most virulent in the republican party.

    The republicans just want oil and guns, and we know who they're burning to shoot. It's in the news every day and also causing riots.
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19136

    Nov 09, 2014 4:00 PM GMT
    I think the only thing that can be taken from this election is that nothing ever stays the same for very long in politics. The pendulum swings both ways. In 2016, the story may be a swing in the other direction. No one should feel too comfortable.
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    Nov 09, 2014 4:03 PM GMT
    HottJoe saidThe results suggest that the lies the republicans run on have taken hold with some people in this election... It probably helps their cause to stick it to the teachers, just to keep the electorate less educated and playing into the hands of fear mongering.

    It's all a bait and switch game. They attract Latinos without budging on the number one issue latino families face, which is immigration, and all the profiling involved in immigration enforcement, by promising them conservative policies that take rights away from others.

    You say they are against handouts, but the white middle class of 1950 which is still alive today had their status handed to them on a silver platter. Republicans have tricked people into thinking the middle class just happened all its own, without government assistance, and that's a lie. Democrats made the middle class, with strong unions etc. Unfortunately, both parties were only serving white people back then. It's the stain of racism that persists today and is the most virulent in the republican party.

    The republicans just want oil and guns, and we know who they're burning to shoot. It's in the news every day and also causing riots.


    You seem to know better than the Republicans what the Republicans want. icon_rolleyes.gif

    Latinos also favor legal immigration - particularly those who are already here. Both Republicans and Democrats believe that immigration needs to be fixed - except it was the Obama Administration that decided not to try to have the Startup Immigration act passed when it had the support of both sides of the aisle in Congress.

    You conflate teachers with teachers unions which are not the same... but this is why you don't understand the world Joe.
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    Nov 09, 2014 4:18 PM GMT
    The massive Republican midterm victory: control of Senates, Houses - State and Federal

    You live in Canada, and have ties to China. And so our US politics, over which you are so obsessed, affects you HOW? Upon what is your expert knowledge & interest in the US political scene based that compels you to always be posting about it here? And posting nothing else?
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Nov 09, 2014 4:18 PM GMT
    ^My cousin was a teacher in Wisconsin, years ago now, but he quit after Walker was elected. It just was viable anymore, because of what was to done to teachers in that state.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Nov 09, 2014 4:22 PM GMT
    riddler78 said
    HottJoe saidThe results suggest that the lies the republicans run on have taken hold with some people in this election... It probably helps their cause to stick it to the teachers, just to keep the electorate less educated and playing into the hands of fear mongering.

    It's all a bait and switch game. They attract Latinos without budging on the number one issue latino families face, which is immigration, and all the profiling involved in immigration enforcement, by promising them conservative policies that take rights away from others.

    You say they are against handouts, but the white middle class of 1950 which is still alive today had their status handed to them on a silver platter. Republicans have tricked people into thinking the middle class just happened all its own, without government assistance, and that's a lie. Democrats made the middle class, with strong unions etc. Unfortunately, both parties were only serving white people back then. It's the stain of racism that persists today and is the most virulent in the republican party.

    The republicans just want oil and guns, and we know who they're burning to shoot. It's in the news every day and also causing riots.


    You seem to know better than the Republicans what the Republicans want. icon_rolleyes.gif

    Latinos also favor legal immigration - particularly those who are already here. Both Republicans and Democrats believe that immigration needs to be fixed - except it was the Obama Administration that decided not to try to have the Startup Immigration act passed when it had the support of both sides of the aisle in Congress.

    You conflate teachers with teachers unions which are not the same... but this is why you don't understand the world Joe.

    Now you seem to know what everyone wants. There are American citizens born here who have family who are illegal, and deportation means destroying families. It's playing and interfering in peoples' lives to much. The republicans I hear talk about immigrants as though they're not human. Look what roadbikerob has said, and I've seen it get a thousand times worse. The republicans are the party against immigration. It's a two party system and there's always a line drawn in the sand and you can see which side they're on.
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    Nov 09, 2014 4:26 PM GMT
    Art_Deco saidThe massive Republican midterm victory: control of Senates, Houses - State and Federal

    You live in Canada, and have ties to China. And so our US politics, over which you are so obsessed, affects you HOW? Upon what is your expert knowledge & interest in the US political scene based that compels you to always be posting about it here? And posting nothing else?


    Just because you don't look at the other items I do post about, doesn't mean I don't. You've already exposed yourself to be a bigot - why do you continually attempt to claim to support liberal causes?
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14371

    Nov 09, 2014 4:26 PM GMT
    HottJoe said^My cousin was a teacher in Wisconsin, years ago now, but he quit after Walker was elected. It just was viable anymore, because of what was to done to teachers in that state.
    Oh put a sock in it Joe, these goddamned, greedy public employee unions are constantly trying to hit on the overburdened taxpayers for more pay raises when in reality the money just isn't there but these greedy public employees don't give a shit. I wish that New York had a governor like both Wisconsin and Michigan have so we could get this state's financial house in order. In my state senate district, the stupid voters decided to send a convicted felon to represent them in Albany because he was backed by the New York State United Teachers Union. He is also a democrat so he will join the four other ex-cons in Albany all of them are democrats. Go figure.
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    Nov 09, 2014 4:28 PM GMT
    HottJoe saidNow you seem to know what everyone wants. There are American citizens born here who have family who are illegal, and deportation means destroying families. It's playing and interfering in peoples' lives to much. The republicans I hear talk about immigrants as though they're not human. Look what roadbikerob has said, and I've seen it get a thousand times worse. The republicans are the party against immigration. It's a two party system and there's always a line drawn in the sand and you can see which side they're on.


    Er, no - when it comes to what other people what, I'm only quoting and citing how the elections have gone. Your citation of fictitious republicans is interesting but not particularly relevant - because as you'll note, Republicans made substantial inroads with minorities - who you apparently believe are too stupid to understand their own interests.
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    Nov 09, 2014 4:34 PM GMT
    riddler78 said
    Art_Deco saidThe massive Republican midterm victory: control of Senates, Houses - State and Federal

    You live in Canada, and have ties to China. And so our US politics, over which you are so obsessed, affects you HOW? Upon what is your expert knowledge & interest in the US political scene based that compels you to always be posting about it here? And posting nothing else?

    Just because you don't look at the other items I do post about, doesn't mean I don't. You've already exposed yourself to be a bigot - why do you continually attempt to claim to support liberal causes?

    You haven't answered my question.

    I do support liberal causes. I'm a member of HRC, and Equality Florida, Dolphin Democrats (gay Florida Democrats), I'm on the Founders Circle of major donors for our local Pride Center, a member of the major contributor Spirit of Hope society for Broward House (the largest HIV/AIDS organization in the State of Florida) and I'm regularly bashed here by members like you for being a "libtard".

    How am I not a Liberal and yet a bigot? I have all the credentials for the former, about which I'm regularly bashed here, and none for the latter.
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    Nov 09, 2014 4:41 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    riddler78 said
    Art_Deco saidThe massive Republican midterm victory: control of Senates, Houses - State and Federal

    You live in Canada, and have ties to China. And so our US politics, over which you are so obsessed, affects you HOW? Upon what is your expert knowledge & interest in the US political scene based that compels you to always be posting about it here? And posting nothing else?

    Just because you don't look at the other items I do post about, doesn't mean I don't. You've already exposed yourself to be a bigot - why do you continually attempt to claim to support liberal causes?

    You haven't answered my question.

    I do support liberal causes. I'm a member of HRC, Equality Florida, Dolphin Democrats (gay Florida Democrats), and I'm regularly bashed here by members like you for being a "libtard". How am I a bigot?


    When did I call you a libtard? That's horribly offensive to the mentally challenged. And I have repeatedly answered your question and I'll do so once more - most of my work is in the US and I pay US taxes.

    But as has been noted - you have exposed yourself to being a bigot - just because you are a card carrying member of xyz, is irrelevant given how your regressive views.
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    Nov 09, 2014 4:43 PM GMT
    HottJoe said^My cousin was a teacher in Wisconsin, years ago now, but he quit after Walker was elected. It just was viable anymore, because of what was to done to teachers in that state.


    Your cousin is probably an idiot. Teachers are still making a very good living in Wisconsin.

    This is why Walker continues to be reelected:
    http://online.wsj.com/articles/joseph-rago-how-scott-walker-keeps-winning-1415405344?mod=trending_now_1
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Nov 09, 2014 4:46 PM GMT
    riddler78 said
    HottJoe saidNow you seem to know what everyone wants. There are American citizens born here who have family who are illegal, and deportation means destroying families. It's playing and interfering in peoples' lives to much. The republicans I hear talk about immigrants as though they're not human. Look what roadbikerob has said, and I've seen it get a thousand times worse. The republicans are the party against immigration. It's a two party system and there's always a line drawn in the sand and you can see which side they're on.


    Er, no - when it comes to what other people what, I'm only quoting and citing how the elections have gone. Your citation of fictitious republicans is interesting but not particularly relevant - because as you'll note, Republicans made substantial inroads with minorities - who you apparently believe are too stupid to understand their own interests.

    I'm not making up fictitious people. I get my ideology from real life. Politics is just about what's going on that day. But you can believe whatever you want, as you always seem to do, if that helps you justify yourself.

    I also haven't called anyone stupid, but you're unable to respond to anything I post without twisting my words, as you've repeatedly shown. In fact, I think you're the only one calling anyone stupid. You like to call me stupid in every post because that's apparently the only way you know how to disagree with someone.

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    Nov 09, 2014 4:48 PM GMT
    HottJoe saidI'm not making up fictitious people. I get my ideology from real life. Politics is just about what's going on that day. But you can believe whatever you want, as you always seem to do, if that helps you justify yourself.

    I also haven't called anyone stupid, but you're unable to respond to anything I post without twisting my words, as you've repeatedly shown. In fact, I think you're the only one calling anyone stupid. You like to call me stupid in every post because that's apparently the only way you know how to disagree with someone.



    Nope it's because in the face of actual facts compared with your anecdotal evidence (when it's clear that you hold very extreme liberal views), you're unwilling to entertain facts. That's what makes you ignorant - that's what makes you incapable of coping with cognitive dissonance.
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    Nov 09, 2014 4:49 PM GMT
    More on the real gains by women in the Republican party:

    http://dailycaller.com/2014/11/06/davis-fluke-and-dunham-liberal-feminisms-rage-spiral/
    Radical liberal feminism — the kind that likes abortion on demand and taxpayer-funded birth control — has been rejected at the polls. Or, at least, it’s been a really rough week, or so. And I’m not just talking about the fact that Sen.-elect Cory Gardner effectively pushed back on the “war on women” narrative by defeating Colorado’s ”Mark Uterus.”

    The story also played out in Texas, where — writing about the race — Mollie Hemingway observed: “Wendy Davis was the face of ‘War On Women’ Politics. How’d that go?” And it played out in California, where Sandra Fluke lost a bid for the state Senate.

    And! It played out all across the nation, as conservative women won historic elections. As I noted at The Week: “West Virginia Rep. Shelley Moore Capito and Iowa’s Joni Ernst, for example, will both become the first female senators ever elected from their respective states. New York’s Elise Stefanik last night became the youngest woman ever elected to Congress. And Utah’s Mia Love became the first Haitian-American member of Congress. I could go on…” (Meanwhile, it was a slightly less good night for liberal female candidates like Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes.)
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Nov 09, 2014 4:50 PM GMT
    riddler78 said
    HottJoe saidI'm not making up fictitious people. I get my ideology from real life. Politics is just about what's going on that day. But you can believe whatever you want, as you always seem to do, if that helps you justify yourself.

    I also haven't called anyone stupid, but you're unable to respond to anything I post without twisting my words, as you've repeatedly shown. In fact, I think you're the only one calling anyone stupid. You like to call me stupid in every post because that's apparently the only way you know how to disagree with someone.



    Nope it's because in the face of actual facts compared with your anecdotal evidence (when it's clear that you hold very extreme liberal views), you're unwilling to entertain facts. That's what makes you ignorant - that's what makes you incapable of coping with cognitive dissonance.

    Says a propagandist for oil and fracking...icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Nov 09, 2014 4:52 PM GMT
    HottJoe saidSays a propagandist for oil and fracking...icon_rolleyes.gif


    Precisely the kind of thinking (or more appropriately, lack thereof) I've come to expect of you.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Nov 09, 2014 4:56 PM GMT
    riddler78 said
    HottJoe saidSays a propagandist for oil and fracking...icon_rolleyes.gif


    Precisely the kind of thinking (or more appropriately, lack thereof) I've come to expect of you.

    You spread lies and dole out misinformation all day long. You take an extreme conservative position on every issue, so it's hypocritical for you to complain about my extreme liberalism, as though you're some moderate.icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Nov 09, 2014 4:58 PM GMT
    riddler78 said
    When did I call you a libtard? That's horribly offensive to the mentally challenged. And I have repeatedly answered your question and I'll do so once more - most of my work is in the US and I pay US taxes.

    But as has been noted - you have exposed yourself to being a bigot - just because you are a card carrying member of xyz, is irrelevant given how your regressive views.

    You continue to avoid my question. What is your obsessive, and grossly uninformed, interest in US politics?

    I did not say you personally called me a libtard. Others here have, and also directed that term against other RJ members. I agree that's an offensive term referencing the mentally challenged. Read my post more carefully.

    Please outline my "regressive views". And how I "have exposed [myself] to being a bigot". I'd enjoy responding to your broad charges in detail.
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    Nov 09, 2014 5:07 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    riddler78 said
    When did I call you a libtard? That's horribly offensive to the mentally challenged. And I have repeatedly answered your question and I'll do so once more - most of my work is in the US and I pay US taxes.

    But as has been noted - you have exposed yourself to being a bigot - just because you are a card carrying member of xyz, is irrelevant given how your regressive views.

    You continue to avoid my question. What is your obsessive, and grossly uninformed, interest in US politics?

    I did not say you personally called me a libtard. Others here have, and also directed that term against other RJ members. I agree that's an offensive term referencing the mentally challenged. Read my post more carefully.

    Please outline my "regressive views". And how I "have exposed [myself] to being a bigot". I'd enjoy responding to your broad charges in detail.


    When did *I* call you a libtard? If I didn't how is that relevant to me? That's horribly offensive to the mentally challenged. And I have repeatedly answered your question and I'll do so once more - most of my work is in the US and I pay US taxes. My views incidentally, seem to be far more based in facts than your own.

    But as has been noted - you have exposed yourself to being a bigot using racist epithets - and just because you are a card carrying member of xyz, is irrelevant given how your regressive views.