Any teachers out there?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 10, 2014 9:24 PM GMT
    So I'm starting a full time teaching job come September next year; English literature to high school students, ages 12-18.

    I won't lie, every now and again I have my doubts about it, but overall I'm really excited. I frickin' love English, and at the risk of sounding naive, I can't wait to teach it. Yes, I know it'll be tough, but I've always had a natural affinity for it... famous last words, eh? icon_rolleyes.gif

    Are there many other teachers here on RJ? If so, what are, for you, the best and worst parts of the job?
  • tango02

    Posts: 71

    Nov 10, 2014 11:11 PM GMT
    I used to be a teacher, now I'm trying to become a graphic designer.

    Hopefully you'll be teaching in a good school, a lot of new teachers start out in the rough schools and drop out of the profession pretty fast. No matter where you end up, first year of teaching will grueling, but it will all be worth it if you have a real passion for what you're teaching. Good luck.
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    Nov 10, 2014 11:46 PM GMT
    JoePC90 saidSo I'm starting a full time teaching job come September next year; English literature to high school students, ages 12-18.

    I won't lie, every now and again I have my doubts about it, but overall I'm really excited. I frickin' love English, and at the risk of sounding naive, I can't wait to teach it. Yes, I know it'll be tough, but I've always had a natural affinity for it... famous last words, eh? icon_rolleyes.gif

    Are there many other teachers here on RJ? If so, what are, for you, the best and worst parts of the job?


    Awesome; more power to you. I only did graduate teaching (mostly calc I) my first couple years in my masters program.

    The best part was definitely the teaching part: lecturing, building lesson plans, writing supplemental materials and demos, and office hours. Nothing like seeing young people apply themselves to give you hope for humanity.

    The worst parts were grading, especially according to someone else's rubric, and having to adhere to a curriculum that doesn't meet the students' needs. I'm sure you'll do great; you can't be worse than me at the former, and I suspect the latter was just due to me being in the wrong place at the wrong time (at the wrong age).
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    Nov 11, 2014 2:50 AM GMT
    You lucky guy! As a romantic for poetry and literature, I enjoy teaching American lit, but I rarely get to teach this because where I live (racial prejudice is not illegal here), there is a demand for Caucasians teachers regardless of their expertise. In the past, I taught SAT prep and GED courses to students who need to get high school diplomas to attend universities. Because of their desperation, these teenagers usually will listen to my musing on F. Scott Fitzgerald, Willa Cather, and Walt Whitman.

    I used to think these teens are illiterate until I discovered that they'd read American YA novels of the sci-fi or vampire genre!

    I was a language lab teacher once for elementary and middle school. It was very hard to keep the classes relatively quiet, and one 8th grade boy hit me when I wrote him a detention! But I am grateful one former NYC teacher let me observe his class to learn how to apply his strict methods to control the teens.

    Good luck!
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    Nov 11, 2014 2:53 AM GMT
    yep..physics
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    Nov 11, 2014 2:54 AM GMT
    I've taught 8th-grade English in the past for three years, and I may be returning to teach again soon
    I enjoy it because while most of the students are just killing time, you do get two or three who are really turned on and inspired by what you have to say, and that makes it worth while
    The only teacher I remember from high school with fondness was my AP English teacher, who made James Joyce, Yeats, Robert Browning, and Ezra Pound comprehensible, and unlocked the beauty in their writing for me
    (sorry for the lack of punctuation, my fucking keyboard's period key has quit working)
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 11, 2014 2:55 AM GMT
    I taught a stupid person how to be stupider. Does that count?
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    Nov 11, 2014 4:49 AM GMT
    I used to be aspired to be a teacher, but then I got a comfortable office job with a public agency that made me settled for life. icon_biggrin.gif

    I may retire early, move back to Asia, and teach English there some day.
  • tazzari

    Posts: 2937

    Nov 11, 2014 5:00 AM GMT
    Taught English for 16 years: 7th and 8th grade, with an occasional 10th grade class. I loved it deeply, and still do, but life moved me on into other things that I also loved.

    Loved: working with kids; 7th graders aren't cool yet, and it's easy to get them interested if you play a little (Middle School teaching is 25% showmanship/entertainment) and treat them with respect (I always gave papers back the next day).

    Hated? The odd really awful parent, most faculty meetings, end-of-term grading & comments, though the comments were good for me and the kids.

    Hang in there. I loved it from the word go,, but if you're not happy after two or three years, stop. Teaching can be nuturing or self-destroying.

    I envy you!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 11, 2014 5:13 AM GMT
    as a student i've read online about teachers being biased in grading, meaning teachers give better grades if it fits their views.

    dont do that lol. just grade if they have good arguments or something? (ok idk how teaching english works)

    /ok bai
    /good luck and have fun
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    Nov 11, 2014 7:55 AM GMT
    tango02 saidI used to be a teacher, now I'm trying to become a graphic designer.

    Hopefully you'll be teaching in a good school, a lot of new teachers start out in the rough schools and drop out of the profession pretty fast.


    Ah, well actually the training scheme I'm on places people in schools where at least 40% of children are on free school meals, i.e. 'economically deprived', so the school might well be rough.

    I already work part-time in a school which fits that criteria though, and to be honest, that part of the job isn't worrying me too much. It will be harder, but I also think it's more rewarding to teach a class with less advantages than say, its private school equivalent.

    All the things you guys have outlined I've been thinking about, including the negs - but it's really encouraging to hear that in general it seems to be a good job for those who are passionate, like me!