Buying a bike to loose weight and enjoy outdoors? 115kgs 54 yrs ! What type is bike I need.?

  • johnlesyd

    Posts: 18

    Nov 16, 2014 5:42 AM GMT
    Enjoying gym but need more cardio and outdoor fresh air too loose my weight. Like to know what bike us best! What I need to be safe and avoid injury. And not destroy it!! Thanksicon_mad.gif
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    Nov 16, 2014 5:57 PM GMT
    loose weight
    control what you eat is 95% of loosing weight, exercise, tho always a good thing, has little to do with weight loss.

    bike
    they are expensive so I would also be interested in getting recommendations on a street bike >medium quality. What are good used ideas, what are some forums. Considerations for lesbians with mech skills?
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    Nov 16, 2014 6:26 PM GMT
    I'd be less concerned about that weight on a bike than on your spine. Roadies and mountain lean you far forward and you've got a lot of weight that would pull down on your back. I'd consider some sort of hybrid or expedition to start with handle bars higher than the seat where you don't have to lean forward to reach them to keep your back more perpendicular to the ground.

    As a bonus, you'd then be able to check out some double track or hard packed trails as well as paved surfaces so while you're losing weight you'd see which of that you might prefer and then after working more on core to support your spine and losing some weight go with either roadie or trail (or both) depending on your preference, if you want to specialize out of the hybrid (though someone corrected me in another thread as I hadn't looked into them in a while and I see now that the hybrids can be quite capable themselves).

    It could be that you could start with a hybrid that's trail capable only start with some handlebars that keep you vertical and change them out later.

    But my main point here would be concern for body position, especially with so much excess weight. You don't want the exercise to fuck you up.
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    Nov 16, 2014 7:59 PM GMT
    Looking at your profile, a Mtn bike would not be a good fit. Trek has a bike that might be a good starting point for someone of your physicality.
    It's their 520 line. They are a great bike for a novice. Well thought out, super cheap in price, (not construction) @ only $1500.00-1600.00 Plus it can carry a load of 275 lbs. (125KG)

    Get one....see if you like. If not, then you didn't really waste anything.
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    Nov 16, 2014 8:56 PM GMT
    THE MOST IMPORTANT FACTOR when carrying extra weight on a bike is to keep your tires properly inflated.

    Buy a good pump with a pressure gauge. Check your tire pressure and inflate as needed before every ride.

    Visit a local bike shop and let a pro help you find the right fit.
    I suspect you can find what you need for about 600 Aus$...and perhaps less if your shop has any used bikes to suit you.

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    Nov 16, 2014 9:19 PM GMT
    Get a bike that lets you ride fast and hard. Riding slow isn't cardio. I see lots of overweight cyclists.

    That said, look into something in the $600+ range if you're buying new. If you're buying used, don't go under $400.

    And remember...

    ride-hard-or-go-home.png
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4862

    Nov 16, 2014 9:30 PM GMT
    JamesItaly saidSorry,, I'm a teacher and I just can't not post this.

    Lose - to misplace something
    Loose- when something is not tight

    You lose your keys
    Your belt is loose

    Good luck losing weight!


    Many of us make those mistakes. It's good to know proper usage.
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    Nov 16, 2014 9:33 PM GMT
    FRE0 said
    JamesItaly saidSorry,, I'm a teacher and I just can't not post this.

    Lose - to misplace something
    Loose- when something is not tight

    You lose your keys
    Your belt is loose

    Good luck losing weight!


    Many of us make those mistakes. It's good to know proper usage.

    Does this mean that all these years people have been calling me lose?
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    Nov 16, 2014 9:33 PM GMT
    Determinate saidTHE MOST IMPORTANT FACTOR when carrying extra weight on a bike is to keep your tires properly inflated.
    ...
    And if you're going to bunny hop a 4 foot gap in the sidewalk, be sure to clear it. Cause if your back tire clips it, you'll be walking several miles home from a pinch flat like I did last night. icon_lol.gif
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    Nov 17, 2014 7:59 AM GMT
    Practically speaking you will not lose weight peddling a bike cycle. You don't want to use a machine that is designed to make work easier. Jumping rope is far more time effective exercise.

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    Nov 17, 2014 1:01 PM GMT
    I love cycling and I own two bikes…. a mountain and a road bike. I've found it one of the best ways to lose and maintain a proper weight…. so here's my advice.

    Starting out with over 200lbs look for a medium priced mountain or standard type bike. Make sure it's built for your weight.

    Make sure you pump up the tyres every time you use it. I've had two flats… both times i've slacked off and not pumped up my tyres to the max…aahhh

    For an athletic body…. you will burn off all the fat in your blood stream after 25 minutes of good cycle. After that you are burning off the last deposited fat. So if you do a nice 72k ride you're cleaning house. If you match that with a low sugar/alcohol diet/ fat diet…. you're doing something.

    My average speed on a mountain bike is 20kph, on the road bike it's 30kph. The human body in good form produces around a third of a horsepower. Super efficient more… less efficient a lot less.

    Follow the rules of the road. There are more accidents from sidewalk riders then road riders. I don't know what the riding is like where you are. Here the roads and traffic are very good.

    Keep hydrated and good luck on your quest… hope that helps
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    Nov 17, 2014 3:07 PM GMT
    johnlesyd saidEnjoying gym but need more cardio and outdoor fresh air too loose my weight. Like to know what bike us best! What I need to be safe and avoid injury. And not destroy it!! Thanksicon_mad.gif



    The "best" first bike for someone, is often an inexpensive but decent quality bike found on craigslist which fits you. You can find out if you like bike riding without spending a ton of money on a new one, where the Good Stuff starts beyond $1000 and hits $2000-$3000 very quickly at your local bike store. Almost all bike shops carry both new and used bikes in a range of sizes, and will be happy to help you find the right size for you. Whether you buy a used one from them, or find one from an individual who is upgrading and selling their own entry-level bike, they want your parts and maintenance business for the long run and want you to find a bike you will put miles on and buy other accessories, clothes, helmets, etc to use with it.

    As to the KIND of bike, it is determined by your own interests AND the places you have to ride where you live. If you feel comfortable in riding on the road (as I do) around traffic, then a "road" bike offers you the best speed for the pedaling effort you expend, as well as the range to attract you to ride longer and further, and burn more calories. A heavy inexpensive "mountain" bike gives you a lot of bang for the buck, and off-road versatility if you have a lot of useable dirt roads or trails where you live, but can be significantly harder to pedal in hilly terrain, and is slower on the road as well due to drag caused by larger knobby tires. They are also less fun to ride with other people if you want to join a bike club to encourage yourself to ride regularly.

    There are "hybrid" bikes of various types, which can be thought of as doing many different things, or as doing specific things not as well as a bike intended for that purpose. Most people do better by deciding the kind of riding they want to do first, and then picking a bike intended for that purpose second.

    If you just want to ride at a modest pace around your neighborhood at 10-12 mph, you can do that with a new $150 Wal-Mart junk bike, but if you are serious about losing weight, you need to be serious about increasing your level of effort to riding 15-20 mph and for several hours at a time, to raise your metabolic rate during your ride and for some time afterwards. Riding TO and FROM the gym is also a way to rev up your body before and after a non-cardio weight-training session every time you go there; I can get 50 miles a week just doing that. I usually ride 150 to 200 miles a week on a "road" (drop handlebar) type bike, and use that and playing racquetball at the gym to drop me from my previous weight around 175, to my current weight in the 140s, without having to do any serious dieting. Great cholesterol numbers; BP in the 100/60 range at rest; works for me, and probably would work for you also. I rode ~9000 miles last year, so I apply this advice I am offering to you, on a $1600 Titanium frame road bike I bought new from bikes-direct online, so my suggestions are based on my personal experience not theory; as they say, "your mileage may vary". Good luck, and ride carefully on the road, under a good helmet with a rear-view mirror on it.
  • woow

    Posts: 61

    Nov 17, 2014 3:27 PM GMT
    JamesItaly saidSorry,, I'm a teacher and I just can't not post this.

    Lose - to misplace something
    Loose- when something is not tight

    You lose your keys
    Your belt is loose

    Good luck losing weight!



    icon_eek.gificon_biggrin.gif
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    Nov 18, 2014 2:06 AM GMT
    I ride quite allot, Im not a purist. This past spring I upgraded to a Dawes Roundhouse 2000 full suspension mountain bike with front/ rear disc brakes and 24 speeds. Even though I ride 99% pavement, the suspension makes it real comfortable expecially riding along sidewalks and crossing joints, etc.

    I have mine setup for long range biking so it has the rear rack and front fender and small bag on the rack and has 3 drink holders on it as well, duel headlamps and taillight and 2 rechargeable battery packs and last but not least, a cell phone holder on handlebars.. In one day (10 hours)I rode the Silver comet trail from Atlanta Ga to across the Alabama state line and back.

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    Nov 18, 2014 3:47 AM GMT
    musclefetish saidLooking at your profile, a Mtn bike would not be a good fit. Trek has a bike that might be a good starting point for someone of your physicality.
    It's their 520 line. They are a great bike for a novice. Well thought out, super cheap in price, (not construction) @ only $1500.00-1600.00 Plus it can carry a load of 275 lbs. (125KG)

    Get one....see if you like. If not, then you didn't really waste anything.

    This is good advice, IMHO. It's what I bought each of my 2 sons, when they became teenagers. A good adult beginners bike.
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    Nov 18, 2014 9:35 AM GMT
    davidingeorgia saidI ride quite allot, Im not a purist. This past spring I upgraded to a Dawes Roundhouse 2000 full suspension mountain bike with front/ rear disc brakes and 24 speeds. Even though I ride 99% pavement, the suspension makes it real comfortable expecially riding along sidewalks and crossing joints, etc.

    I have mine setup for long range biking so it has the rear rack and front fender and small bag on the rack and has 3 drink holders on it as well, duel headlamps and taillight and 2 rechargeable battery packs and last but not least, a cell phone holder on handlebars.. In one day (10 hours)I rode the Silver comet trail from Atlanta Ga to across the Alabama state line and back.

    Just looked up that bike. For the price point ($399 USD) it's not a bad deal.

    However, if he has hills to climb, a larger rear cassette may be needed, as that one only has a 11-30 tooth setup. For longer climbs, a 11-36 tooth cassette would be a much better option.

    Here's the link for the bike:
    http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/dawes/rh_2k.htm
  • JamesItaly

    Posts: 26

    Nov 19, 2014 5:56 PM GMT
    woow said
    JamesItaly saidSorry,, I'm a teacher and I just can't not post this.

    Lose - to misplace something
    Loose- when something is not tight

    You lose your keys
    Your belt is loose

    Good luck losing weight!



    icon_eek.gificon_biggrin.gif


    Haha,,, ok while the two commas together are just a style thing I sometimes do online or when writing an sms,, I accept the double negative is not gramatically correcticon_redface.gif

    As I say to my students when they spot an error on the board, 'that was there to test you',, so you can have a sticker Woow!!!