Thoughts on Being Location Independent?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 24, 2014 5:55 PM GMT
    Not sure if this should go in the travel section or not but I think there's a few guys who might be able to give me some good insight into this.

    I've been reading a few travel blogs and a few years ago read the 4 Hour Workweek (which I'm not too much of a fan of but there's still some good chapters in there) and am also reconsidering some things about what I want my future to be like. I've been going for a higher paying job without much luck for the past few months and am rethinking how realistic achieving some of my "American Dream" goals really are in this economy... I'm starting to think about alternate options and what "success" really means.

    Travel though is an important long term goal of mine and I'm already planning for short trips to see family in the US next year but want to extend that to world travel and have a list of destinations I'm saving up for/ researching.

    It seems (especially after the post recession economic fallout) there's a growing number of people who are either part time backpackers or they're nomadic travelers who are funded by savings, teaching English abroad or generate they're own income stream of some sort.

    The thing is I'm someone who likes stability and I'd want to travel but also at the same time have my own place to come back to after traveling to recharge for the next destination. That takes a lot of money I'm guessing since you need to pay monthly rent on your place back home, plane tickets, accommodations and travel expenses, etc... You also can't work at a normal 9-5 since most workplaces don't just let you fly off around the globe whenever you want unless that's a main part of your position (and if it is it's still not the same as independent travel IMO) I'd have to probably have develop my own income stream or practically be independently wealthy to do it- especially considering I live in NYC. I'll probably have to compromise on something down the line even if I decide to experiment with traveling for a year.

    There's a travel blogger/ writer who's living the type of lifestyle that I'm desiring but he makes a bit over $100,000 (I'm guessing through online products or consulting)
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    Nov 24, 2014 6:26 PM GMT
    William Gibson explores some of those ideas in his recent near-future scifi series of books, but I can't remember exactly which one off hand. I do recall that it involves having a pocket full of sim cards and that "your soul trails along behind you on the end of a 5000-mile long bungee cord.)

    One way that some people maintain a nomadic or semi-nomadic lifestyle is to live on a sailboat. (Or motorboat, but you know, the wind is free and doesn't need refueling.) When you get tired of a place, simply pull up the anchor... The cost of the lifestyle is highly variable, depending on your needs and desires and whether you do your own maintenance or hire it out. Of course, what you would do for a living could be restricted, but if you basically work on a computer, does it matter where the computer is located? I recently read through the blog of one young guy who says that in five years voyaging (without working) he spent something like (IIRC) $20K, including the cost of the boat. (During the recent financial crash, medium-sized boats in fair to good condition could be had for about the cost of a used car. Prices are starting to recover though.) Then it occurred to me that during all of the years that I spent paying for crummy little apartments, I mostly lived near navigable water... Oh well - a chance missed I suppose.

    Oh, btw, more than once I've been playing phone tag with someone who "works in NYC," and then found out that they were actually physically located in a cabin out in the Rocky Mountains or something. Once, it was a magazine editor who as it happens was really only 10 miles from me! We did lunch - 3000 miles away from Manhattan.
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    Nov 26, 2014 5:08 AM GMT
    Well, recruiters think people are location independent. You should see the emails I get from them when I post my resume on monster and career builder.

    Some people are living in long-stay hotels.
  • ai82

    Posts: 183

    Nov 26, 2014 3:53 PM GMT
    One of my coworkers works part-time, like a regular on-call position, so that she can travel. She picks up different shifts depending on where she is. She goes off mountain climbing and seeing the streets of Brazil, then I see her every couple of months. She enjoys it. Downside - no company health insurance. Also, even though she working part-time, she still makes a good salary. She saves money on traveling by using things like airbnb and traveling with friends.

    I think you should do what makes you happy. I say get a trailer in a rural area, or buy a place and rent it out while you travel. I'm not for sure how to best save money on airfair, but I imagine using airbnb (or something similar) could save you money. I've also seen places that say they will let you stay as long as you work, like on some type of farm. Best of luck.

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    Nov 26, 2014 3:53 PM GMT
    Take flying lessons and become an airline pilot.

    The starting pay is painfully low for the first several years, but you get plenty of time off to travel independently...and it's free!

    The only reason I chose a different type of flying for work is because I don't enjoy flying big planes, and I don't like the atmosphere at big airports. But if you really want to travel a lot, that's the best way to accomplish it.
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    Nov 26, 2014 9:55 PM GMT
    My brother was in his 40's before he reconnected w a girl he'd met packpacking thru Europe 20 yrs earlier. He quit his job as a CPA, which he'd always hated and opened up a small academy teaching business english to spaniards.He now lives in a small town on Mallorca in the Mediterranean, makes half the income and has never been happier. He's his own boss which provides total autonomy to work as much or as little as he wants. I don't think there's really a moral or any advice there but I think it's important to avoid a career you hate and if at all possible, to be your own boss. At least look for a position with flexibility that allows you to work remotely.
  • Ironman4U

    Posts: 738

    Nov 27, 2014 8:46 PM GMT
    I intentionally built a consulting, coaching and training business that is location independent. It took me years to get to this point... to build my client base and my expertise, so that I can charge enough money to be paid a lot without working a lot (while still adding plenty of value so my clients want to work with me for years and years at a time). Like I said, it took time, but now I've paid my dues so I can enjoy my freedom and I can go and live wherever I want or travel frequently from a home base.

    I also have some younger friends (20's/30's) who are currently travel hacking and seeing the world for a year. While they're in the States, they are traveling in a small camper. One of them saved money for the trip, while the other is doing some virtual software programming work on the road to make it work. So, it seems like there are multiple ways to have the lifestyle. Figure out what you want and get creative. It can work if you want it badly enough and can figure out.
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    Dec 05, 2014 5:02 AM GMT
    Ironman4U saidI intentionally built a consulting, coaching and training business that is location independent. It took me years to get to this point... to build my client base and my expertise, so that I can charge enough money to be paid a lot without working a lot (while still adding plenty of value so my clients want to work with me for years and years at a time). Like I said, it took time, but now I've paid my dues so I can enjoy my freedom and I can go and live wherever I want or travel frequently from a home base.

    I also have some younger friends (20's/30's) who are currently travel hacking and seeing the world for a year. While they're in the States, they are traveling in a small camper. One of them saved money for the trip, while the other is doing some virtual software programming work on the road to make it work. So, it seems like there are multiple ways to have the lifestyle. Figure out what you want and get creative. It can work if you want it badly enough and can figure out.


    This. I've done something similar with my own life. I'm now working on dual-citizenship in an EU country to expand my options on where I live and create value.
    https://nomadlist.io/ is a useful site.
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    Dec 05, 2014 5:08 AM GMT
    I would love to live this lifestyle. Don't know how I'm going to get it, but sometime within the foreseeable future I will achieve it....icon_biggrin.gif