Technology of Education: Freshening Up My CS101 Class from 1991 with a Stanford MOOC CS101 Class from 2014. Wow.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 25, 2014 9:11 AM GMT
    I was curious about database classes.
    I think I started with amazon.com for books on database skills.
    I was reading a 3-star review by someone who suggested instead of buying the book I was viewing, I should just check out Stanford's

    Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC).

    So, I did. I registered for four mini, self-paced classes.

    Grateful and Happy!
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    Nov 25, 2014 9:24 AM GMT
    https://class.stanford.edu/courses

    Let me know what you think and if you're taking any courses there.

    Here's a website I saved when I searched some more.

    Top 10 MOOCs
    It lists for example MOOCs at Yale, Harvard, MIT.

    Amazing what MIT has.

    http://www.bdpa-detroit.org/portal/index.php/comittees/high-school-computer-competition-hscc/29-education/57-moocs-top-10-sites-for-free-education-with-elite-universities.html
  • buddycat

    Posts: 1874

    Nov 25, 2014 10:22 AM GMT
    I have taken a couple of these courses, one from Stanford and one from University of Washington. The Carnegie Mellon open courses are interesting because it allows you to teach a course. A nice way to gain experience with it. Of course one of the downfalls is they are not for-credit and even though the course materials are the same, the assignment requirements are not as extensive. You can earn a statement of completion. I do have one, from Stanford. I find though that many courses offered aren't what I want to learn or review.
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    Nov 25, 2014 12:20 PM GMT
    I have completed 4-5 courses there, mostly related to Maths and CS. It's a good way to keep yourself update with current advancement in technology and also for refreshing your previous knowledge. There are mainly two platforms - coursera and udacity. I like coursera better.
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    Jan 09, 2015 8:34 PM GMT
    I've just gotten my first green check mark!

    I like this!
  • buddycat

    Posts: 1874

    Jan 10, 2015 8:18 PM GMT
    The pitfalls about this is that if you receive recognition for the course, it will state that it was a free course and you have no affiliation with the college. I have a statement of completion that states just that. The assignments are also not as demanding. I am currently enrolled in an online course through University of Maryland and you get no recognition unless you pay. Of course you would be paying for something that says you have no affiliation with University of Maryland outside of paying them money. If you want to learn something great, you don't communicate with the instructor since thousands take those courses. You can always pick up a book, which may be a better option since you can learn what you want, not just what is available.
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    Jan 20, 2015 1:47 PM GMT
    I've done a MOOC or two myself, but the downside for me is that the only go to a certain depth in terms of knowledge. I think it's nice to scan and see whether a course/domain might be interesting for you.