US Thanksgiving Dinner Items

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    Nov 27, 2014 4:16 AM GMT
    I started a thread asking about plans for attending Thanksgiving dinner in the US. That promptly got hijacked & derailed by a non-US citizen over political issues. Let's see how long this one lasts.

    Essential to a US Thanksgiving is a turkey. Because of the tradition that the wild turkey is what the first Pilgrims ate.

    When I was a kid (c. 1950s) eating a turkey was a terrible ordeal. Dry as a piece of cardboard, you just did it for the ritual.

    Today most turkeys are pretty good, unless you're a lousy cook. So I look forward to a turkey tomorrow. Along with stuffing, something the Pilgrims may not have done.

    Other items supposedly "traditional" are cranberry sauce, and pumpkin pie. Questionable whether the first Pilgrims knew about those, either.

    My Irish grandmother had tureens of mashed potatoes (not native to New England), and another tureen with a blend of mashed potatoes and mashed turnips. I tried making that a few years ago, but nobody would touch it. Yet to me, that's as Thanksgiving as a turkey.

    So what are your own favorite dishes, that say "Thanksgiving" to you?"
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    Nov 27, 2014 4:18 AM GMT
    Ok, so im not American…. but what is the deal with Green Bean Casserole? I love green beans… I bet its good.. it looks good... I want it!! icon_lol.gif
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    Nov 27, 2014 4:22 AM GMT
    Art_Deco saidI started a thread about plans for attending Thanksgiving dinner in the US. That promptly got hijacked & derailed by a non-US citizen over political issues. Let's see how long this one lasts.

    Essential to a US Thanksgiving is a turkey. Because the tradition is the wild turkey is what the first Pilgrims ate.

    When I was a kid (c. 1950s) eating a turkey was a terrible ordeal. Dry as a piece of cardboard, you just did it for the ritual.

    Today most turkeys are pretty good, unless you're a lousy cook. So I look forward to a turkey tomorrow. Along with stuffing, something the Pilgrims may not have done.

    Other items supposedly "traditional" are cranberry sauce, and pumpkin pie. Questionable whether the first Pilgrims knew about those, either.

    My Irish grandmother had tureens of mashed potatoes (not native to New England), and another tureen with a blend of mashed potatoes and mashed turnips. I tried making that a few years ago, but nobody would touch it. Yet to me, that's as Thanksgiving as a turkey.

    So what are your own favorite dishes, that say "Thanksgiving" to you?"


    A turkey must be brined . That means at least 24 hours in a solution of sugar , salt water andnd herbs


    I recommend 48 hours

    An emulsion of butter and herbs should be injected under the skin and smeared on top.

    Baste every 15 minutes

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    Nov 27, 2014 4:29 AM GMT
    hairyandym saidOk, so im not American…. but what is the deal with Green Bean Casserole? I love green beans… I bet its good.. it looks good... I want it!! icon_lol.gif

    Green Bean Casserole is unknown to me. I grew up in the US Northeast, on the edge of New England.

    But Canada has its own Thanksgiving. Do you guys have certain dishes that are identified with the holiday?
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    Nov 27, 2014 4:42 AM GMT
    Green bean casserole is a 1950s style concoction of green beans and canned cream soup finished with crispy onions. I grew up with it in upstate NY.

    Bob, turnips might be an age thing more than Irish. Ml we used to have them every year for my grandfather. He was the only one who ate them. There was a small dish of mashed turnips on the table every thanksgiving for years after he died.

    I am making duck this year. Just to change it up.
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    Nov 27, 2014 4:52 AM GMT
    hairyandym saidOk, so im not American…. but what is the deal with Green Bean Casserole? I love green beans… I bet its good.. it looks good... I want it!! icon_lol.gif


    It's a dish that started out in the Northern part of the United States. I want to say it began in New Jersey but I could be wrong. It's actually very yummy and usually, homemade green bean casserole is the best. The only time I found the dish to be yummy outside the home was at a high end food store called Dean & Deluca. Actually, now that I think about it….EVERYTHING in Dean & Deluca is yummy! icon_biggrin.gif

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    Nov 27, 2014 4:54 AM GMT
    Coincidentally, just after I made my last disparaging comment about "thanksgiving" a dozen wild turkeys strutted into my yard and started beating up my peacocks. (To steal their food.) Ah well, I just had the dogs shoo them away.

    I'm actually having grilled salmon, though when the family was together, we sometimes had a whole baked salmon for thanksgiving. Maybe it's a northwest thing. (We used to trade with the indians - cherries and honey for salmon.)
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    Nov 27, 2014 5:12 AM GMT
    Wyndahoi said
    I am making duck this year. Just to change it up.

    I love duck! One of our 2 hosts will be making a capon. He hates turkey, so that's an alternative he always prepares, in addition to all the turkey we'll have.

    His partner's straight married brother will be bringing a baked ham. Which my own family always had for Easter without fail, and sometimes for New Years and at other times, but never Thanksgiving. That was turkey only.

    Only odd thing: the partner, and his partner's brother who prepared and is bringing the baked ham, along with some others of their family who'll be attending, are all... Jewish! I guess that upsets some preconceived notions. And yet, I've sat across the table from these same people to celebrate a formal Seder with them, so they do identify as active Jews.

    Ah, well, so much for notions. There is the US Thanksgiving, and there is the Passover, which is another kind of earlier Thanksgiving. I like how many of us blend these things all together.
  • bro4bro

    Posts: 1037

    Nov 27, 2014 5:14 AM GMT
    I use the paper bag method of cooking a turkey.

    You coat the inside of a brown paper grocery bag with vegetable oil. Place the turkey inside (I put it on a sheet of aluminum foil so it won't stick to the paper). Roll up the end of the bag. Stick it in the oven at 375F and forget it.

    No basting needed. It cooks much quicker this way than in a roasting pan. And it comes out moist.

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    Nov 27, 2014 5:15 AM GMT
    These 3 pounders are great for a small crowd, no bones, easy to prepare and only a couple hours to cook thawed, who needs a 20 lb, does anybody really eat the legs? icon_lol.gif


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  • bro4bro

    Posts: 1037

    Nov 27, 2014 5:21 AM GMT
    Oh, and I hate yams!

    Especially when they're cooked with marshmallows on top...
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    Nov 27, 2014 5:22 AM GMT
    Well, traditionally, we Beavers eat duck on Saturday, before the civil war game. But sadly, it seems that the quacks are most likely to be the eaters this year icon_sad.gif So we'll be having a bit of a poker game going to keep our minds off the carnage.

    Ya never know, though...
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    Nov 27, 2014 5:58 AM GMT
    I made a couple of desserts today----lime mousse and cheesecake
  • AMoonHawk

    Posts: 11406

    Nov 27, 2014 6:38 AM GMT
    Wild-Turkey-Rye-lg.jpg
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    Nov 27, 2014 6:56 AM GMT
    Thanksgiving here:

    The pleasure of the company of my closest friends, who have been sharing this meal for a decade.

    Good wine

    Turkey (a heritage breed - hard to find, but the best tasting)

    Sweet potatoes (no marshmallows!)

    Haricorts verts with butter (overcooked - till tender - what can I say - I like them very tender instead of al dente)

    Stuffing- made with fruit/nuts/sausage, whole wheat bread and cinnamon challah (for my Jewish friends)

    Cranberry relish, including cherries soaked in framboise liqueur

    Gravy (turkey stock, giblets, onions and celery sauteed in turkey fat)

    Apple pie - crust made with lard rendered from pork from the neighborhood butcher - (Winesap or Rhode Island Greening apples) with a dab of homemade creme fraiche

    More wine

    Way too much fat, and way too many calories - a twice a year guilty pleasure



  • buddycat

    Posts: 1874

    Nov 27, 2014 9:13 AM GMT
    I am going to eat pie. Been a long time since I had pie.
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    Nov 27, 2014 3:26 PM GMT
    AMoonHawk said
    Wild-Turkey-Rye-lg.jpg


    It's truly what the Pilgrams were so damned thankful for...
  • carew28

    Posts: 662

    Nov 27, 2014 5:00 PM GMT
    Growing up, my family often had mashed turnips during holiday (Christmas, Thanksgiving, Easter) dinners.
    I haven't had them in many years now, and I miss them.
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    Nov 27, 2014 5:19 PM GMT
    carew28 saidGrowing up, my family often had mashed turnips during holiday (Christmas, Thanksgiving, Easter) dinners.
    I haven't had them in many years now, and I miss them.

    Me, too! My late grandmother always had mashed turnips at Thanksgiving, but usually mixed with some mashed potatoes. I loved them!

    Today I can't find them, the only thing I can get is rutabaga, which is related. But this was 55 years ago when I was a kid before she died, I don't know what vegetables you could get back then. I can't find turnips here today. And maybe they really were rutabagas she used, I wouldn't know. She just called them turnips.
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    Nov 27, 2014 9:27 PM GMT
    They had mashed carrots and turnips mixed in the cafeteria today at lunch. I ate them in honor of Art_Deco. icon_cool.gif
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    Nov 27, 2014 9:45 PM GMT
    Everyone had GrandMothers who cooked magnificent dinners.

    My Grandmothers had nice gloves

    My Paternal GrandMother had only a vague idea of where the kitchen was

    My Maternal Grandmother tried...but OH GAWD. No one in their right mind would eat it.

    Here We are

    Gotta be charming to people I don't know lol

    Fml

    Happy t-day Boys!!M
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    Nov 27, 2014 9:48 PM GMT

    Happy Thanksgiving Art, Cash, SB, Wyndahoi, hairyandym, mindgarden, Erik101, bro4bro, ScruffLA, HikerSkier, buddycat, and carew28.

    Courtesy of my Dad, an after-supper Thanksgiving Grace:

    'The Lord be praised!
    My belly is raised,
    An inch above the table,
    And I'll be damned,
    If I'm not crammed,
    As much as I am able.'
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    Nov 28, 2014 3:22 AM GMT
    Cash saidEveryone had GrandMothers who cooked magnificent dinners.

    My Grandmothers had nice gloves

    My Paternal GrandMother had only a vague idea of where the kitchen was

    My Maternal Grandmother tried...but OH GAWD. No one in their right mind would eat it.

    Here We are

    Gotta be charming to people I don't know lol



    Fml

    Happy t-day Boys!!M


    Well, I used to think that until they got older. The roast or turkey was usually 'incinerated' and salt was about the only spice ever used. My mother used to say, "the meat is so tender it melts in your mouth… NO, it disintegrated in your mouth cause it had the living crap cooked out of it! I remember once serving her a medium steak and she told me it was ' bloody raw'! LOL..I miss those meals. icon_wink.gif
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    Nov 28, 2014 3:32 AM GMT
    hairyandym saidOk, so im not American…. but what is the deal with Green Bean Casserole? I love green beans… I bet its good.. it looks good... I want it!! icon_lol.gif

    That's been a traditional favorite at many a Thanksgiving I've attended but I can't touch the stuff. To me, canned string beans and canned cream topped with onion chips - or whatever that stuff is - is atom bomb shelter food.

    Yet I don't mind the low-rent secret ingredient in "candied" yams topped with marshmallows that makes it palatable - canned pineapple.
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    Nov 28, 2014 3:33 AM GMT
    Cash said
    A turkey must be brined . That means at least 24 hours in a solution of sugar , salt water andnd herbs

    I recommend 48 hours

    An emulsion of butter and herbs should be injected under the skin and smeared on top.

    Baste every 15 minutes


    Best brined, then cooked slow in a smoker. No other method is harder, nor more rewarding.