My Christmas Shopping Nearly Done - And All Online

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    Nov 29, 2014 3:47 AM GMT
    I just bought my husband his primary gift online, delivering next week. As well as a few trinkets for myself. Christmas this year is gonna be a little lean, I had to spend nearly $4000 to replace the house central air in October, on top of car costs, for new tires and some unexpected repairs, that ran another $2000.

    I told him I'm gonna put a big red ribbon on the house A/C unit, and that's gonna be his Christmas present. Not really, of course, but it seriously strapped me, money I had set aside for his presents.

    As for my own trinkets, they really are silly. One is a couple of egg cups for him & me, for eating soft-boiled eggs. Most younger guys here won't even know what those are. Another is an egg topper. It cuts the top of the shell off a soft-boiled egg, so you can eat the egg right from the shell. And last is a set of egg spoons, miniature sized to eat the egg from the opened shell.

    They will all go lovely with his own gift, so that older guys here can probably guess now what it is.
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    Nov 29, 2014 3:51 AM GMT
    you love eggs
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    Nov 29, 2014 3:52 AM GMT
    David3K saidyou love eggs



    LMAO! icon_lol.gif I almost forgot about the egg cup fiasco.
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    Nov 29, 2014 3:55 AM GMT
    Scruffypup said
    David3K saidyou love eggs



    LMAO! icon_lol.gif I almost forgot about the egg cup fiasco.

    now share it
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    Nov 29, 2014 4:19 AM GMT
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    Nov 29, 2014 4:33 AM GMT
    David3K saidyou love eggs

    Yes, I like them for breakfast, and eating them certain ways. As I did alongside my grandmother as a little kid. The older I get (and I've now outlived her in age), the more I find myself returning (or perhaps regressing) to that early time in my life.

    The fast, efficient pace of modern living isn't important to me any more, nor the austere simplicity of the Army life I knew. Today at times I like to indulge in more elaborate rituals for eating and other daily acitivies, with fussy little accompaniments.

    Why I'm not entirely sure. Some is nostalgia I know, but some is... perhaps trying to slow down the clock. Maybe if I slow myself down, the clock will slow down, too. And I desperately want the clock to slow, if not stop altogether.

    So I dunno. But this is what I find myself doing, turning ordinary daily routines into little formal rituals, as if they had some importance. And like I had an audience watching me perform them. I suppose this is what idleness in your waning years brings you. icon_sad.gif
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    Nov 29, 2014 4:39 AM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    David3K saidyou love eggs

    Yes, I like them for breakfast, and eating them certain ways. As I did alongside my grandmother as a little kid. The older I get (and I've now outlived her in age), the more I find myself returning (or perhaps regressing) to that early time in my life.

    The fast, efficient pace of modern living isn't important to me any more, nor the austere simplicity of the Army life I knew. Today at times I like to indulge in more elaborate rituals for eating and other daily acitivies, with fussy little accompaniments.

    Why I'm not entirely sure. Some is nostalgia I know, but some is... perhaps trying to slow down the clock. Maybe if I slow myself down, the clock will slow down, too. And I desperately want the clock to slow, if not stop altogether.

    So I dunno. But this is what I find myself doing, turning ordinary daily routines into little formal rituals, as if they had some importance. And like I had an audience watching me perform them. I suppose this is what idleness in your waning years brings you. icon_sad.gif



    You might enjoy this book I just finished reading: Mindfullness for Beginners by Jon Kabat-Zinn
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    Nov 29, 2014 5:10 AM GMT
    Scruffypup said
    Art_Deco said
    David3K saidyou love eggs

    Yes, I like them for breakfast, and eating them certain ways. As I did alongside my grandmother as a little kid. The older I get (and I've now outlived her in age), the more I find myself returning (or perhaps regressing) to that early time in my life.

    The fast, efficient pace of modern living isn't important to me any more, nor the austere simplicity of the Army life I knew. Today at times I like to indulge in more elaborate rituals for eating and other daily acitivies, with fussy little accompaniments.

    Why I'm not entirely sure. Some is nostalgia I know, but some is... perhaps trying to slow down the clock. Maybe if I slow myself down, the clock will slow down, too. And I desperately want the clock to slow, if not stop altogether.

    So I dunno. But this is what I find myself doing, turning ordinary daily routines into little formal rituals, as if they had some importance. And like I had an audience watching me perform them. I suppose this is what idleness in your waning years brings you. icon_sad.gif

    You might enjoy this book I just finished reading: Mindfullness for Beginners by Jon Kabat-Zinn

    Not sure. I just read some reviews, and some excerpts. I don't know if I wanna parse everything I do. Makes me feel like a psychological hypochondriac.

    I just kinda look with puzzlement at my life, but I don't wanna analyze and delve too deeply. First, I find the practice of intense self-reflection rather vain & egotistical. Second, I'm not sure the answer I might find today will hold up tomorrow. Third, we're the least objective of all observers of our own lives. The final judgment must always be in the hands of others, not ourselves.

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    Nov 29, 2014 1:41 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    Scruffypup said
    Art_Deco said
    David3K saidyou love eggs

    Yes, I like them for breakfast, and eating them certain ways. As I did alongside my grandmother as a little kid. The older I get (and I've now outlived her in age), the more I find myself returning (or perhaps regressing) to that early time in my life.

    The fast, efficient pace of modern living isn't important to me any more, nor the austere simplicity of the Army life I knew. Today at times I like to indulge in more elaborate rituals for eating and other daily acitivies, with fussy little accompaniments.

    Why I'm not entirely sure. Some is nostalgia I know, but some is... perhaps trying to slow down the clock. Maybe if I slow myself down, the clock will slow down, too. And I desperately want the clock to slow, if not stop altogether.

    So I dunno. But this is what I find myself doing, turning ordinary daily routines into little formal rituals, as if they had some importance. And like I had an audience watching me perform them. I suppose this is what idleness in your waning years brings you. icon_sad.gif

    You might enjoy this book I just finished reading: Mindfullness for Beginners by Jon Kabat-Zinn

    Not sure. I just read some reviews, and some excerpts. I don't know if I wanna parse everything I do. Makes me feel like a psychological hypochondriac.

    I just kinda look with puzzlement at my life, but I don't wanna analyze and delve too deeply. First, I find the practice of intense self-reflection rather vain & egotistical. Second, I'm not sure the answer I might find today will hold up tomorrow. Third, we're the least objective of all observers of our own lives. The final judgment must always be in the hands of others, not ourselves.




    You have the concept of the book completely backwards. icon_neutral.gif
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    Nov 29, 2014 3:00 PM GMT
    Scruffypup said
    You have the concept of the book completely backwards. icon_neutral.gif

    "We may long for wholeness, suggests Jon Kabat-Zinn, but the truth is that it is already here and already ours. The practice of mindfulness holds the possibility of not just a fleeting sense of contentment, but a true embracing of a deeper unity that envelops and permeates our lives. With Mindfulness for Beginners you are invited to learn how to transform your relationship to the way you think, feel, love, work, and play-and thereby awaken to and embody more completely who you really are.

    The prescription for living a more mindful life seems simple enough: return your awareness again and again to whatever is going on. But if you've tried it, you know that here is where all the questions and challenges really begin. Mindfulness for Beginners provides welcome answers, insights, and instruction to help us make that shift, moment by moment, into a more spacious, clear, reliable, and loving connection with ourselves and the world."


    I guess that's a bit heavy for me. But I did look into it.
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    Nov 29, 2014 4:21 PM GMT
    I like the convenience of buying online, but getting things delivered tends to be a real pain. I don't know what delivery services are like in the US, but apart from the Royal Mail, the standards of couriers in the UK are not great. Of course, it is a race to the bottom, with couriers trying to outdo one another on price. You end up with a delivery guy on minimum wage expected to deliver 50 packages a day. Something has to give and it tends to be good customer service that suffers (along with the poor bloody drivers).
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    Nov 29, 2014 4:57 PM GMT
    Ex_Mil8 saidI like the convenience of buying online, but getting things delivered tends to be a real pain. I don't know what delivery services are like in the US, but apart from the Royal Mail, the standards of couriers in the UK are not great. Of course, it is a race to the bottom, with couriers trying to outdo one another on price. You end up with a delivery guy on minimum wage expected to deliver 50 packages a day. Something has to give and it tends to be good customer service that suffers (along with the poor bloody drivers).

    My only problem is that waiting for a delivery ties me down. At least I don't work and can usually be at home, or else a neighbor will take the delivery. And sometimes, depending on the item, although bought online I can specify nearby store delivery, which gives me more flexibility.

    Retail packages in the U.S. are mostly shipped via UPS, FedEx, and sometimes our USPS. I'll get email notice of which carrier they've used, and then can track the shipment hourly on their respective websites.

    Each carrier tends to deliver to our complex the same time every day, which helps me arrange my schedule. Once I read the "Out for delivery" notice on their website I know when the package will arrive almost to the hour.
  • carew28

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    Nov 30, 2014 7:28 PM GMT
    Art_Deco saidI just bought my husband his primary gift online, delivering next week. As well as a few trinkets for myself. Christmas this year is gonna be a little lean, I had to spend nearly $4000 to replace the house central air in October, on top of car costs, for new tires and some unexpected repairs, that ran another $2000.

    I told him I'm gonna put a big red ribbon on the house A/C unit, and that's gonna be his Christmas present. Not really, of course, but it seriously strapped me, money I had set aside for his presents.

    As for my own trinkets, they really are silly. One is a couple of egg cups for him & me, for eating soft-boiled eggs. Most younger guys here won't even know what those are. Another is an egg topper. It cuts the top of the shell off a soft-boiled egg, so you can eat the egg right from the shell. And last is a set of egg spoons, miniature sized to eat the egg from the opened shell.

    They will all go lovely with his own gift, so that older guys here can probably guess now what it is.


    Growing up in the 1950s and 60s, we ate all of our eggs soft-boiled, out of egg-stands. I never had fried eggs until I went away to college and had them in the cafeteria. I haven't seen an egg-stand, or eaten a boiled egg out of the shell, in many years. I guess it's a lost art. I'm not sure that kids today would even know how to do it.

    Another implement of bygone days is the shoehorn. Last month I bought a new pair of shoes in a department-store, and asked the salesclerk if I could have a shoehorn with them. This was a department-store that I'd worked at, in the shoe dept., back in the 1970s, and we always gave out shoehorns if a customer requested them. The salesclerk, a young girl, didn't know what I was talking about. I described it for her, but she'd never seen one.
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    Nov 30, 2014 8:26 PM GMT
    carew28 said
    Growing up in the 1950s and 60s, we ate all of our eggs soft-boiled, out of egg-stands. I never had fried eggs until I went away to college and had them in the cafeteria. I haven't seen an egg-stand, or eaten a boiled egg out of the shell, in many years. I guess it's a lost art. I'm not sure that kids today would even know how to do it.

    Another implement of bygone days is the shoehorn. Last month I bought a new pair of shoes in a department-store, and asked the salesclerk if I could have a shoehorn with them. This was a department-store that I'd worked at, in the shoe dept., back in the 1970s, and we always gave out shoehorns if a customer requested them. The salesclerk, a young girl, didn't know what I was talking about. I described it for her, but she'd never seen one.

    "Egg stands" in the US are usually called egg cups. Some people collect them, because they can be made quite elaborate, and whimsical.

    I just like simple white ones. Which is what I have coming from Williams Sonoma. I always keep my eye open for them at thrift stores and flea markets, but they're becoming very rare.

    I also have an eggshell "decapitator" from Germany being shipped, that snips the top fifth of the shell off neatly, so you can eat the egg while it sits in the cup. Also a set a mini spoons just for that purpose.

    When I was a kid the stores always included a shoehorn in the box with the shoes you bought. It was embossed with their company name & address, an advertisement for them. And when you bought a man's lint brush for your suit, the handle often did double duty as a shoe horn.

    I suppose if I went back over 100 years to my grandparents' era (all 4 born in the 1800s) they could also relate all the routine things they did back then that would be a mystery today. I'm not always sure when it is we're making progress, or just losing useful traditions & customs.

    I hate to sound conservative, because politically & socially I'm not. But I dunno, sometimes I like the elegant habits & customs we had.
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    Nov 30, 2014 10:41 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said...As for my own trinkets, they really are silly. One is a couple of egg cups for him & me, for eating soft-boiled eggs. Most younger guys here won't even know what those are.


    No minutia however random or inane has gone unbroached (or in this case, unpoached) on RealJock:

    Egg Cups, I Adore Them! (4/13/14):
    http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/3776536

    a thread on which RJers were asked to post pictures of their favorite egg cups.