Looking to move to NYC or one of its boroughs in late 2015-2016...


  • Nov 30, 2014 1:52 AM GMT
    West Coast, born and raised, and at the urging of my parents, I am strategizing to move there to get into the editing/publishing world between completing undergrad and applying to graduate school. I've never been to the east coast for more than a month, and haven't been to New York since I hit puberty.

    I suppose this post is an amalgamation of things: beside the rat race mentality and the fact that many things in the upper echelons are beyond my control (family name, school name, country clubs, etc...) what should I know as a long-time Californian looking to move into orbit of the most industrious city on earth? Additionally, any advice on the process of selecting and securing a place in NYC would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks guys.
  • Shepz76

    Posts: 1

    Nov 30, 2014 4:25 PM GMT
    There's no in-n-out burger in nyc. That will be a huge change lol
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    Nov 30, 2014 4:42 PM GMT
    The boroughs don't count.

    NO one actually wants to live in one.

    If You come here, Manhattan is the only option.

    But it ain't easy.

    There are actually MANY very nice places very close to manhattan- even New Jersey.

    I was born in New Jersey.

    You would think they would have closed it down just for THAT.
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    Nov 30, 2014 5:11 PM GMT
    If it were me, I would try to establish a few connections in NYC and make visits to get a feel to see if it is what I really want.

    Then after a few visits I would make a plan to either work and go to school, depending on cost of living, or just work/go to school solely.

    The city is exciting and full of things to do, but without a plan I personally couldn't move to a large city.
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    Nov 30, 2014 6:34 PM GMT
    I think your best options is applying for graduate school and being accepted like for example New York University. Once accepted then housing become part of school. You can then surmise if New York is really where you want to settle or even continue school or transfer. It seems from your post that your parents are also pushing for this, but after all is your decision and your happiness. Sometimes our parents tend to push their dreams and expectations which might not be the case. I caution you to really think hard of what you want.

    I lived in Southern California and now in Northern California. I also lived in New Jersey for 7-months and visited New York. I can tell you from my experience after living in the West Coast for so many years it was a shock. I rather now just visit New York as a tourist. The bad attitude and arrogance of New Yorkers was a complete turn-off, New Jersey as well, and the closed mind of them. I lived in Paramus,NJ and it was an awful experience that I will never forget and I am glad that I was able to move back and find another job back in the West Coast. I had a friend that lived in Morristown and Princeton, NJ and she was originally from Atlanta and also lived in the West Coast, after a couple of years she moved back to the West Coast, she just could not take it anymore. It is just a different sense of priorities and lifestyle. Additionally, the stupid fees,tolls, and taxes were shocking. Not to mentioned what I called complete robbery for a deposit in getting an apartment and then an additional inspection fee to the township city because it was instituted by township that the apartment was ready to move in, although the landlord and through inspection is suited to be rented you can not move in until you pay this fee to the Township separately. This NEVER happens in the West Coast, again where I would have to pay the city of Orange, Riverside, Los Angeles, Orange County, etc. a separate fee that the apartment is ready to move in because an inspector has said it has. Again, it is obvious why these antiquated laws were created, but it shows how these Townships, Burroughs, continue these practices until this day because of revenue . Again, these were my experiences but I wish you the best.
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    Nov 30, 2014 6:49 PM GMT
    Riko_sal saidIf it were me, I would try to establish a few connections in NYC and make visits to get a feel to see if it is what I really want.

    Then after a few visits I would make a plan to either work and go to school, depending on cost of living, or just work/go to school solely.

    The city is exciting and full of things to do, but without a plan I personally couldn't move to a large city.


    Plans NEVER work.

    ESPECIALLY here.

    You have to throw Yourself in it and know that EVERYTHING will change from minute to minute.

    You wanna live by a "plan?"

    Move to Cincinnati.

    Manhattan?

    The way to live is to know what You want but be ready to change EVERYTHING at the drop of a dime.






    And learn how to cook.

    I'm sick of Dudes who can't boil water.

    I WAS one once.

    It's better to know how.





    That had nothing to do with anything but I am CASH and sometimes like to carry on.

    Part of My charm.
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    Nov 30, 2014 7:26 PM GMT
    Have a plan..

    If you are going to come here, try to secure an internship or whatever you are aiming for.

    Then you know your budget for rent.. unless your parents wallet is coming too ;)

    Housing can be hard to find, and it ALL goes fast. Even the shittiest place you see will be gone in a few days.

    Try to find a real estate broker. I have a good one but I don't know your range, he's a little pricey.

  • KissTheSky

    Posts: 1981

    Nov 30, 2014 10:32 PM GMT
    NYC is great -- everyone should live there for a while, especially as a young, single person. It has the best gay scene in the world.
    You will have an amazing time and remember your experiences for the rest of your life.
    I lived in Manhattan and in Brooklyn, and I actually liked Brooklyn better. It's much more affordable and full of young people and creativity.
    Ignore the haters and enjoy! icon_biggrin.gif
  • flahotstuff

    Posts: 154

    Nov 30, 2014 10:37 PM GMT
    dont bring siutcases of clothes bring suitcases of money and lots of it!!!
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    Dec 01, 2014 2:17 AM GMT
    The Big Apple is a great city and will give you a lot of experience of how to live on your own (or sink or swim) but as other noted NYC is expensive. Food cost and day to day living cost are high but nothing will prepare you for the sticker shock of rent. Average rents are super high compared to other cities around the nation- this alone makes a lot of young people move even with decent paying jobs once they realize how much of their income goes toward it. Also, competition for those decent paying jobs is insanely fierce even at for entry level position. For general positions which are common it might be wise to consider a lower cost city.

    There's a lot of good and bad aspects to living in the city but I'd advise to make a few visits to NYC for a week or so to see if it's somewhere you can see living.
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    Dec 01, 2014 6:39 AM GMT
    I've been to NYC for about a week a long time ago in 2005. I stayed in the Chelsea area during Thanksgiving. I had a friend who just moved there, she worked for a Japanese bank now in Manhattan. She pays like 3k for a 1bedroom in NYC. You might want to live in Brooklyn or even Queens to save up some money. There are people looking for roommates on CL in NYC-Manhattan, but those go up pretty fast. NYC is pretty fast-paced, competitive and has a high cost of living standard. And Not to mention the cold weather. You should really consider if you do need to move there, if you make the commitment, try to network, connect and save up load of $$$.

  • Dec 01, 2014 10:12 AM GMT
    Hey guys,

    First off, thank you for the responses, they are greatly appreciated, and each one provided a piece of the puzzle for me.

    First off, I'm not looking to move to manhattan proper. At least, not yet. Like I said, my mother was born and raised in queens before she moved out west, and she worked in Manhattan for a time. She has a long-time friend in Brooklyn/Queens who is willing to house me for the first year while I work and save up money. Both I and my parents are against me going straight to graduate school (since I'm one of those artsy-fartsy majors, I need time to work on my artsy [though not fartsy] skills), so I don't mind paying my dues. Mom didn't have a pleasant experience with the pacing, but she said there were valuable life skills to be learned there, and on a graduate application "six months in Manhattan is three years anywhere else."

    In terms of the people, I've had my fair share of snoots on the west coast. Not saying that New Yorkers are better or worse, but I'm very quickly learning and conditioning the "water off the back" method, although I will definitely miss In-n-Out.

    I'm not too concerned with the gay scene. I'm there to learn. That said, what are some positive things about the gay scene there? What makes NYC lgbt culture different from, say, LA or SF (hold the snark, please.)

    Thanks again!
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    Dec 01, 2014 2:58 PM GMT
    southbeach1500 saidDon't live in NYC. Live right across the river in New Jersey and you'll at least be able to escape some of the ludicrous taxes that you would pay as a resident of NYC (though NJ's taxes are pretty high too).

    Good point, but, depending on where you live you may need a car, which adds to one's expenses. Some parts of Jersey, such as Jersey City and Hoboken are convenient to New York; others, much less so. I know; I grew up in Jersey.
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    Dec 01, 2014 3:00 PM GMT
    pazzy saidwell like what southbeach said, living in nyc may sound like a good idea but it makes no sense unless you have the money to live there. it's expensive as all hell.



    Yes, having a modest savings is important, especially if you arrive without a job or place to stay. I know; I recently did so.
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    Dec 01, 2014 3:00 PM GMT
    Shepz76 saidThere's no in-n-out burger in nyc. That will be a huge change lol


    True but you can get real corned beef and pastrami. icon_smile.gif
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    Dec 01, 2014 3:01 PM GMT
    Cash saidThe boroughs don't count.

    NO one actually wants to live in one.

    If You come here, Manhattan is the only option.

    But it ain't easy.

    There are actually MANY very nice places very close to manhattan- even New Jersey.

    I was born in New Jersey.

    You would think they would have closed it down just for THAT.


    Millions of people live in the boroughs and are perfectly happy. I even know friends who live in the "sixth borough" (i.e., New Jersey) and are perfectly happy.
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    Dec 01, 2014 3:07 PM GMT
    uombroca said

    (snipped for brevity)

    I lived in Southern California and now in Northern California. I also lived in New Jersey for 7-months and visited New York. I can tell you from my experience after living in the West Coast for so many years it was a shock. I rather now just visit New York as a tourist. The bad attitude and arrogance of New Yorkers was a complete turn-off, New Jersey as well, and the closed mind of them.

    (snipped for brevity)


    I honestly disagree with this sentiment. Here are comments I wrote in a thread concerning the West Coast vs. East Coast a few weeks ago.
    _____________________________________

    I can only speak from my personal experiences. I lived in New York for many years, and then I lived in San Diego for many years. In August, I returned to New York.

    Many San Diegans are warm and affable in day-to-day encounters and when you first meet them. I was particularly struck by this when I first moved there from New York many years ago. However, developing close relationships and building a social network is often daunting. Many San Diegans are very nice, but eschew making new, close friends in my experience. I think it may have something to do with the reality that many San Diegans I met were very much into "positive" thinking. Therefore, they don't like to disagree with anyone or express feelings and opinions that might rub others the wrong way for fear of being perceived as "negative". Similarly, when they feel down, they avoid talking about it. As a result, many San Diegans are guarded in expressing honest thoughts and emotions and frequently avoid expressing strong feelings about almost anything substantive. They often lack strong passions. The emphasis is on being laid-back and chilling out. As you can imagine, this makes the development of genuine, lasting friendships challenging.

    New Yorkers, in my personal experience, are very different. Many are cold and impersonal in day-to-day encounters. When first getting to know a New Yorker, he/she can be somewhat distant and cautious. But once you break the ice, it is much easier to develop a lasting friendship with a New Yorker than a San Diegan in my experience. Yes, sometimes New Yorkers are brash. Many will freely and bluntly tell you what they think of you or your opinions without worrying that they will upset you. If you have a very thin skin this may be disconcerting, but at least said New Yorkers are honest and genuine. And many New Yorkers are eager to explore controversial topics with zest. The New Yorkers I have met have multiple strong passions. It is this honesty and willingness to engage others, even with regard to "difficult" topics or feelings, that make communication more heartfelt. As a result, this makes the development of genuine, lasting friendships easier.

    Your mileage may vary.
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    Dec 01, 2014 3:13 PM GMT
    Cash said
    Riko_sal saidIf it were me, I would try to establish a few connections in NYC and make visits to get a feel to see if it is what I really want.

    Then after a few visits I would make a plan to either work and go to school, depending on cost of living, or just work/go to school solely.

    The city is exciting and full of things to do, but without a plan I personally couldn't move to a large city.


    Plans NEVER work.

    ESPECIALLY here.

    You have to throw Yourself in it and know that EVERYTHING will change from minute to minute.

    You wanna live by a "plan?"

    Move to Cincinnati.

    Manhattan?

    The way to live is to know what You want but be ready to change EVERYTHING at the drop of a dime.






    And learn how to cook.

    I'm sick of Dudes who can't boil water.

    I WAS one once.

    It's better to know how.





    That had nothing to do with anything but I am CASH and sometimes like to carry on.

    Part of My charm.


    In my experience, plans sometimes work. I know. I relocated to New York from San Diego late last summer. I had a plan. Naturally, things didn't go 100% as planned. There have been surprises (some good, some bad). But within six weeks I had two jobs that paid adequate money, a comfortable place to live, and reconnected with friends and family in the area. This would not have happened without a plan.
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    Dec 01, 2014 3:15 PM GMT
    Adam228 saidHave a plan..

    If you are going to come here, try to secure an internship or whatever you are aiming for.

    Then you know your budget for rent.. unless your parents wallet is coming too ;)

    Housing can be hard to find, and it ALL goes fast. Even the shittiest place you see will be gone in a few days.

    Try to find a real estate broker. I have a good one but I don't know your range, he's a little pricey.

    Yes, a well thought out budget is highly recommended. Be certain to research cost of living well. Compare it to what you are used to. Unfortunately, it is higher than 99% of the country.
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    Dec 01, 2014 3:52 PM GMT
    A few other comments about New York.

    Depending on who you are and your needs, it is the most exciting city in the U.S. and one of the most exciting in the world. Certainly, if you're into culture, this is so. On the other hand, I would be a liar if I said living in New York is easy for most people, especially if you have never lived in the city before. And, yes, lots of money helps, but it is not absolutely required. Again, it depends on your needs.

    Here are a couple of insightful quotes that contain significant wisdom concerning living in the city.

    “. . . the city is uncomfortable and inconvenient; but New Yorkers temperamentally do not crave comfort and convenience--if they did they would live elsewhere.” --E.B. White, Here is New York

    “But the city makes up for its hazards and its deficiencies by supplying its citizens with massive doses of a supplementary vitamin--the sense of belonging to something unique, cosmopolitan, mighty and unparalleled. . . .” --E.B. White, Here is New York

    "I have quickly learned that falling in love with New York City means first letting yourself get really uncomfortable. When you're uncomfortable, it means you're shedding the old and exposing yourself to new, to better. Not knowing where you are going or who you are going to meet can be quite intimidating. But the good thing about this city is that if you don't like a certain place or a particular person, there are thousands more, literally, right around the corner." --Casey Cavanagh, How to Fall in Love With New York City, Huffington Post (7/1/14).

    E.B. White's lengthy essay "Here is New York", originally published in Holiday magazine in 1949, is still amazingly relevant and insightful today. It has been re-printed as a small book and is on the Internet if you search.



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    Dec 01, 2014 4:05 PM GMT
    WriteinDeepSpeak saidHey guys,

    First off, thank you for the responses, they are greatly appreciated, and each one provided a piece of the puzzle for me.

    First off, I'm not looking to move to manhattan proper. At least, not yet. Like I said, my mother was born and raised in queens before she moved out west, and she worked in Manhattan for a time. She has a long-time friend in Brooklyn/Queens who is willing to house me for the first year while I work and save up money. Both I and my parents are against me going straight to graduate school (since I'm one of those artsy-fartsy majors, I need time to work on my artsy [though not fartsy] skills), so I don't mind paying my dues. Mom didn't have a pleasant experience with the pacing, but she said there were valuable life skills to be learned there, and on a graduate application "six months in Manhattan is three years anywhere else."

    In terms of the people, I've had my fair share of snoots on the west coast. Not saying that New Yorkers are better or worse, but I'm very quickly learning and conditioning the "water off the back" method, although I will definitely miss In-n-Out.

    I'm not too concerned with the gay scene. I'm there to learn. That said, what are some positive things about the gay scene there? What makes NYC lgbt culture different from, say, LA or SF (hold the snark, please.)

    Thanks again!


    Having a place to stay (whether with friends or family) during your transition to living in New York will give you, and any new transplant, a powerful advantage. Because, unfortunately, temporary housing in New York is scare, expensive, and frequently less than ideal. I know; I briefly used temporary housing when I relocated to New York late last summer.
  • a303guy

    Posts: 829

    Dec 01, 2014 4:43 PM GMT
    Riko_sal saidIf it were me, I would try to establish a few connections in NYC and make visits to get a feel to see if it is what I really want.

    Then after a few visits I would make a plan to either work and go to school, depending on cost of living, or just work/go to school solely.

    The city is exciting and full of things to do, but without a plan I personally couldn't move to a large city.



    Yes! Riko just gave you the best RJ advice of the day.

    Living in NYC requires a will to live with, and on, much less than you are accustomed to, and more than just a small degree of inventiveness, charisma and outside of the box thinking. Arriving without a plan and solid contacts, is a near perfect pathway to failure. I freaking love NYC, but that place can eat you alive in an astonishingly short amount of time without a survival plan.
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    Dec 02, 2014 2:14 AM GMT
    Cash said
    Riko_sal saidIf it were me, I would try to establish a few connections in NYC and make visits to get a feel to see if it is what I really want.

    Then after a few visits I would make a plan to either work and go to school, depending on cost of living, or just work/go to school solely.

    The city is exciting and full of things to do, but without a plan I personally couldn't move to a large city.


    Plans NEVER work.

    ESPECIALLY here.

    You have to throw Yourself in it and know that EVERYTHING will change from minute to minute.

    You wanna live by a "plan?"

    Move to Cincinnati.

    Manhattan?

    The way to live is to know what You want but be ready to change EVERYTHING at the drop of a dime.


    Cash knows his shit.

    I went from cooking in a shitty kitchen, to radioshack, to heading a global design firms IT in the course of 8 months. Everything changes constantly there.