Outdoors USA

  • wareagle99

    Posts: 63

    Dec 05, 2014 6:47 PM GMT
    If you wanted to move somewhere for a couple of years with great outdoor opportunities, hiking, climbing , kayaking, etc, where would you move?

    Probably within the US. Not asking for myself, but two sons who are graduating from different colleges and thinking about moving somewhere together.
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    Dec 05, 2014 6:55 PM GMT
    Depends... do there have to be jobs there?
    Do they want to be in a city, or outside a city, or as far as possible away from the madness?
    Do they require snow? Do they require salt water? Surf? Do they require complete absence of snow?

    I mean, obviously the west coast, but there are a lot of different possibilities.
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    Dec 05, 2014 8:32 PM GMT
    If in the USA, then Florida has year round easy access to abundant nature from adjacent metro areas so great outdoor opportunities land and sea, pretty much everything but climbing.

    If outside the USA then one location I'm considering (though my family is not at all pleased so I don't know yet what I'm doing) is SEA. If requiring income, with at least a bachelor's and some easy to obtain certification they could teach English for enough to live on and even save some as the cost of living is so reasonable. I understand that the hours teaching are good and there'd be lots of time to enjoy themselves.

    Working there would not just provide some income but also could provide extended visas to longer enjoy their stay...













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    Dec 06, 2014 12:37 AM GMT
    Colorado; Denver, Golden, Fort Collins, Leadville, Idaho Springs, Durango, Evergreen.

    lots of ski peeps live in Golden CO; its still in the valley but right up against the mountains. also near i70 to take you west into the mountain towns. There is a lite rail in Golden to get you down town Denver.

    the last 4 towns are in the mountains and Evergreen and Idaho Springs are close in so you may be able to commute into Denver. Can infrequently be a long drive in the winter.
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    Dec 06, 2014 12:54 AM GMT
    Well if they don't have to work, and aren't enrolled in grad studies (and aren't gay and need to find gay friends) - there are lots of places -
    Besides the Colorado areas suggested, rural areas of Alaska, Washington, Oregon, Utah, Montana, Maine, California, North Carolina, and Tennessee come to mind. Some places in Hawaii.
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    Dec 06, 2014 3:25 AM GMT
    Puppenjunge saidWell if they don't have to work, and aren't enrolled in grad studies (and aren't gay and need to find gay friends) - there are lots of places -
    Besides the Colorado areas suggested, rural areas of Alaska, Washington, Oregon, Utah, Montana, Maine, California, North Carolina, and Tennessee come to mind. Some places in Hawaii.


    Yes if you are looking for outdoor experiences the west comes to mind first and foremost. Only there will you find spectacular geography and wide open spaces associated with the great outdoors.

    The mountains of North Carolina and Tennessee do offer an east coast alternative. There are rain forests and virgin forests in the smokey mountains straddling the two state and these mountains offer whitewater kayaking, mountain biking, and rock climbing all year long and southern skiing in the winter. But if you want a major city with lots of employment opportunities plus a park that offers whitewater kayaking, flatwater kayaking and Stand up Paddling, mountain biking, zip lines, a rock climbing wall that is only 1.5 hours from the North Carolina mountains and 3 hours from the coast then that would be Charlotte and the park is:

    http://usnwc.org/
  • bro4bro

    Posts: 1032

    Dec 06, 2014 7:46 PM GMT
    Hmm, seems like a lot of people are either giving broad advice on large regions, or a list of places without really giving any specifics on what makes them special. I'll try to go against the grain.

    Durango, Colorado is a beautiful place with great skiing in the winter, kayaking in the spring/summer, and hiking/climbing/biking in the spring/summer/fall. It's a college town so there are a lot of young people around.

    Hood River, Oregon is the nation's premiere sailboarding and kitesurfing destination, and it's right at the foot of Mount Hood, which often has skiing through June. Great climbing in the area too.

    Lahaina, Maui, Hawaii is a great place to drop out of society for awhile. Surfing, standup paddleboarding, sea kayaking, snorkeling, scuba, etc - and it's easy to find a job in the tourism industry, particularly if you're actually willing to show up and work. But be warned that the Cannabis culture is strong there.

    Moab, Utah is a mecca for mountain bikers and climbers.

    If you tell me more about what specifically they're looking for I could probably come up with better suggestions - for example, would they be more into a desert or an alpine climate? Sea kayaking or whitewater? Day hikes or hardcore week-long treks?
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    Dec 06, 2014 8:41 PM GMT
    It would depend on what they enjoy doing outdoors, wouldn't it? If they like the beach, Southern California is where it's at. I lived there and learned to surf, loved to boogie board and I could cycle year-round. Now I live in NH, and those options are gone... Although I am training to run a marathon in the dead of winter. icon_lol.gif
  • bobbobbob

    Posts: 2812

    Dec 07, 2014 2:50 AM GMT
    I have to give a shout out to my US home. Pensacola Florida.
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    Dec 07, 2014 7:31 AM GMT
    perfect here
  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    Dec 07, 2014 1:33 PM GMT
    Virginia has 25% of the Appalachian Trail, beaches, rivers for canoeing and kayaking from glass-like calm to Class 6 rapids, sailing, history, a growing cycling movement in the Richmond area, and JOBS.
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    Dec 07, 2014 2:41 PM GMT
    wareagle99 saidIf you wanted to move somewhere for a couple of years with great outdoor opportunities, hiking, climbing, kayaking, etc, where would you move?

    I did all those things around the Seattle area, in the Cascades and the Olympics. Plus camped (trailer & tent), bicycled and motorcycled, hunted & fished.

    Only drawback is the winter, when you can't do most of those things. Although skiing becomes possible. Not much downhill, but my interest was cross country, which you can do almost anywhere there's snow.
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    Dec 07, 2014 4:03 PM GMT
    I love the UK for its diverse scenery in a relatively small geographical area, but the grandeur of North America's landscapes takes some beating. It really is the 'big country' (cue the theme music).
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    Dec 09, 2014 5:07 AM GMT
    I already live in Utah and am pretty happy here. We have plenty of mountains, skiing, hiking, kayaking, outdoors and etc. I can never get enough of being outside here.

    Salt Lake is a big dirty city, but just 20 minutes east is Park City which lies deep in the Wasatch range. It is rural and not too expensive. It is also within driving distance for jobs/school.