experiences using a microwave based internet provider

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 10, 2014 5:51 PM GMT
    the local company here is skybeam.com
    i currently have a wired commercial account 1.2 meg Bytes/sec down.

    SkyBeam has a local fixed tower 3+ miles away, good line of sight to the tower.
    -their costs are just a little lower
    -their speeds are rated about the same


    anyone have experience with these microwave internet providers? I live in a rural area so no buildings in the way. I know its a bad time of year to evaluate if trees in the way.
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    Dec 10, 2014 7:16 PM GMT
    The only thing I've heard is that rain can degrade the performance. Snow would probably be similar.
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    Dec 11, 2014 10:46 PM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal saidThe only thing I've heard is that rain can degrade the performance. Snow would probably be similar.


    My microwave always cooks chicken to perfection, come rain or shine.
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    Dec 12, 2014 4:07 AM GMT
    Depends on what you use the internet for. Satellite/microwave internet is notorious for latency. Might not be an issue for regular web browsing. But any sort of audio/video chat or stream will be rough. Also if you upload large files, you might as well just use dial-up.
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    Dec 12, 2014 6:26 AM GMT
    When I had satellite, it wouldn't work with VPN or the teleconferencing software that we used then, due to the latency. I thought local microwave would be better?
    Dunno... I've got line of sight to the tower, but they shined me on for years, saying they were "in the permitting process" to add an antenna pointed my way. Before they did, DSL came up my road. And a local guy started his own microwave-based ISP, but I've already got the DSL.
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    Dec 12, 2014 2:33 PM GMT
    sorry I am not talking about satellite, its line of sight microwaves.
    they can match+ my current speeds and a few $ less


    I called my current internet provider (a cable tv provider) and the conversation went like:
    -if i buy my own cable modem (Motorola SB6183 is a very nice one) i loose my static ip address.
    -my rental fee for the old modem (SMC D3G) is $12.00 but I have a $10 discount. The SMC is outdated.

    at the end of the phone call the current internet provider offered to discount my account $10.00 for the next 6mo till i figure what to do.

    i would like to loose my current internet provider, they are kinda creepy. Long term Verizon or Google may come along.
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    Dec 12, 2014 5:57 PM GMT
    I'm not asking for the details, but do you really need a static ip address?

    My isp never did charge a rental fee for the cable modem. I replaced my cable modem with one that also does wireless because I'm running short on power outlets in this corner of the room (or I'm worried that I might trigger the circuit breaker).

    Think twice if Comcast becomes an option; I always hear bad things from friends who have them.

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    Dec 12, 2014 6:58 PM GMT
    static ip
    my for free dns handler has been bought out.
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    Dec 12, 2014 8:24 PM GMT
    pellaz saidstatic ip
    my for free dns handler has been bought out.

    Do the math and figure out if it's worth it to pay for the dns?

    My cable modem (netgear) works with dyndns.org which has a $25 a year plan. I'm not sure how that works; I'm guessing that every time the cable modem is given a new ip address it contacts dyndns.org and updates it?
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    Dec 13, 2014 6:38 PM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal said... I'm not sure how that works...
    This is actually a good thing for privacy. If you do not have a static ip address on your account your internet provider can change your ip address, usually infrequently only every few months. You can cause an event to force a change, maybe like power cycle your cable modem.

    to recover a static situation for your dynamic ip address you need an app someplace on one of your computers or in your router firmware to phone home to your dns handler when your ip address changes. So your new ip address can be re published. Associates your web site name "mygayname.com" to your new ip address. re publish may take a few hours, starts the trickle down to all www dns servers on the planet.


    -something like the dns handler site; dydns.com maybe still does it for free. you need software or firmware.
    -as a software option; an open source firewall app like pfsense.org will do the dydns.com phone home and more.
    -as a firmware option (better up time); there is an open source firmware project dd-wrt you can install on your home router. Buffalo Routers (a hardware purchase from newegg) will readily accept this firmware. They are residential low power and inexpensive. This offer more cool front end things to platy with.


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    Dec 13, 2014 7:01 PM GMT
    It seems to me that using dyndns would be the way to go. With dyndns you're paying $2 a month. ISPs charge extra for a static ip address, probably more than $2 a month. Some may not even offer a static ip address. So with dyndns you have more options and probably a lower monthly cost.

    Although I've never investigated having a static ip address at home so take my claims with a grain of salt. But I do remember seeing someone charging more for a static ip address.
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    Dec 14, 2014 9:05 PM GMT
    One potential problem with terrestrial wireless ISPs is bandwidth hogs. The available bandwidth at any access point is not unlimited, so if you have a bunch of users trying to stream Netflix off the same access point, that entire node slows to a crawl.