How do YOU pick a Personal Trainer?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 19, 2009 4:07 AM GMT
    I have been a Personal Trainer for 2 years and have a question that would help me dial-in to seeking new clients.
    I have worked at a Personal Training Studio that only deals with PT sessions. I have never had to work very hard to find clients. But I am wanting to up my game and do some online advertising. Any advice on what YOU guys look for in a PT would be appreciated.

    Just to get the ball rolling, the things I have heard so far range from "how hot they are," "what gym they work at," "how much they charge," etc.

    Oh yeah, and if you are an SF based RJ guy, recommend what I should be charging per hour (stick it in an email).

    Thanks guys

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 19, 2009 4:20 AM GMT
    the big thing for me is how well I get along with a trainer, mine I get along with like a house on fire and I respect him a great deal (important for me otherwise I don't want to do the work he asks me to do) but, also, how he comes across to me and consistency.

    But big ones
    Personality
    experience
    Price
    Body

    The body one because personally, I don't want an out of shape trainer and I don't just mean he has to be able to out perform me, he has to look the part too and if hes got a body I'd like with a similar body shape then all the better to help drive me cause I have something to look at and compare too.

    Experience is important but I wont go into it you'd already know.

    Price too, but, thats more related to experience and personality.

    At the end of the day I suppose I need to some how click with my trainer, I enjoy going to see him every week, even when I'm hating his guts for making me do it, I still wanna go back for more, if I get that and the experience then I'll happily pay the price.

    My trainer has a fondness for kettle bells, personally I despise the fuc*ers like its no bodies business, however, he gets people who like's them too or want to learn ore about them... so I suppose it helps.

    ps, having a hot trainer, I think its more the body thing I mentioned.. although you are pretty hot so you all set there heh
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    Jan 19, 2009 5:15 AM GMT
    When I went looking for a PT, I wanted to know about the PT's training as to be PT....either certifications or what other training he has had to justify him being a PT

    I also wanted help with nutrition, so I looked for a PT who had training in nutrition.

    Since I was just coming off of cancer therapy, I needed a PT to keep me motivated and dedicated to my exercise program to reach my goals.

    Of course, he had to be someone I got along with personal.


    So I would say an advertisement for clients should emphasize:

    > your PT training and any certifications
    > additional training or interests, such as nutrition
    > your ability to help a client determine goals and stick to them
    > any clients with special needs that you may have worked with...like working with someone recovering from cancer therapy.

    PTs are expensive, but I found that the big selling point to me, besides alll the knowledge that the PT brings, was that working with a PT would enable me to reach my goals. Without a PT, I would never have been able to stick to goals. I view the cost of a PT as an investment in my health ....and without health, you have nothing.

    I used to explain hiring a PT as: If I live, I need the body and if I die, I dont need the money anyway.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 19, 2009 5:36 AM GMT
    Caslon8000 saidWhen I went looking for a PT, I wanted to know about the PT's training as to be PT....either certifications or what other training he has had to justify him being a PT

    I also wanted help with nutrition, so I looked for a PT who had training in nutrition.

    Since I was just coming off of cancer therapy, I needed a PT to keep me motivated and dedicated to my exercise program to reach my goals.

    Of course, he had to be someone I got along with personal.


    So I would say an advertisement for clients should emphasize:

    > your PT training and any certifications
    > additional training or interests, such as nutrition
    > your ability to help a client determine goals and stick to them
    > any clients with special needs that you may have worked with...like working with someone recovering from cancer therapy.

    PTs are expensive, but I found that the big selling point to me, besides alll the knowledge that the PT brings, was that working with a PT would enable me to reach my goals. Without a PT, I would never have been able to stick to goals. I view the cost of a PT as an investment in my health ....and without health, you have nothing.

    I used to explain hiring a PT as: If I live, I need the body and if I die, I dont need the money anyway.

    You could also say you look like Bob Eubanks... http://www.staffannouncer.com/images/eubanks.jpg
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 19, 2009 5:47 AM GMT
    Caslon-- you have forever ruined the Newlywed Game for me, thanks!
    The lady at my bank insists I look like Edward Norton (or the guy from House MD) and always calls me Mr. Norton, so I tried to access HIS bank account, but to no avail.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 19, 2009 5:52 AM GMT
    Well, I think you pass the hotness criteria. icon_lol.gif If I was new to working out and looking for a personal trainer, some basic things I would look for..

    - Someone that has a physique that is similar to what I want my physique to be.

    - Teaches me about fitness and nutrition, and not just tells me what exercises to do and what foods to eat.

    - Doesn't put too much emphasis on stupid rubber band, swiss ball, stability exercises. I see this way too much at my gym. It looks like they're training their clients for Cirque du Soleil or something.

    - Specialty. It might interest some potential clients if you have a particular specialty or experience training people for certain sports.

    - Price of course.
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    Jan 19, 2009 5:58 AM GMT
    I agree with the other posters who say personality is key. The clients have to like you, trust you, be inspired by you, and know that YOU know what you are talking about.
    One thing you could do is ask some of your current clients for testamonials. Are you the sole trainer at your facility? If you are not, have you had any clients come to you because they didn't like a different trainer? What brought them to you? What keeps your current clients with you?
    If you don't want to ask for testamonials, just do an anonymous survery. 4-5 questions relating to client satisfaction on a postcard they can mail in to you.
    Good luck
    mike
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    Jan 19, 2009 8:48 AM GMT
    I've had very bad experiences with trainers.

    I think I'd only work with a trainer if:

    1. They listened. (to me listening is a skill that is not limited to hearing the words, it involves being able to process and give feed back on what was said).

    2. If they didn't know something about a subject they wouldn't pretend that they did.

    3. They're well educated, and willing to keep educating themselves.

    4. There was a refund policy when they forgot an appointment, or they had something else to do

    5. They didn't cancel appointments period. If you set an appointment with someone, those are your work hours. You wouldn't forget that you had to be at your desk job, or schedule a dentist appointment during a board meeting so don't do it to your clients whose time is also valuable. They were definitely about themselves, and I wasn't a priority though I was a client paying them way too much money for a half hour of their crappy routine that I could've and had written up on my own.

    Some of the certifications out there really aren't worth anything. I took a First Aid and CPR class yesterday...just because I took the test and passed doesn't mean I know enough to where I wouldn't hand it over to someone else who had been certified longer or had a bit more knowledge.

    My trainers needed to get over their egos, and admit that they couldn't help me with what I wanted. Then, it was the manager's responsibility to find someone within the company (ther are 10-15 locations) who did have enough knowledge to write up and oversee a challenging training program for me. Of course that didn't happen.

    I came there wanting something specific (conditioning, agility, speed, and functional training) and they tried to pull the stability ball bs on me. Every single one of them were also anti-running unless it was for "20 minutes of cardio on a treadmill."

    Pick a target audience, and reach out to them...evaluate your successes, strengths, weaknesses, and failures and try to find the common ground through all of them. People like strong, attractive trainers, but they also like trainers who are human, and who are people they can relate to.
  • vindog

    Posts: 1440

    Jan 19, 2009 6:07 PM GMT


    I have a kick-ass trainer. I hired him for these reasons:

    1) We jive personality-wise.

    2) I can buy packages and its cheaper. He's $50 for one hour session, and goes down from there depending on how much you buy.

    3) He's all about body balance. Personally I LIKE the rubber balls and what not as its important for balance and strength (especially core). He trains people in order to make them strong so that you decrease your chance of injury. Also we are working on getting my right arms and legs in strength balance.

    4) He's not a musclebound meathead. I always felt that I wanted a trainer who looked like how I want to look.

    5) He works in a private gym, so we are usually not battling people for equipment.


  • GQjock

    Posts: 11649

    Jan 21, 2009 9:39 PM GMT
    The trainers that I have used
    I have watched at the gym work with other people and
    pick them for the general body type that they have

    You don't want a big steroidy guy if you're looking for the long and lean look and visa versa