How Greenpeace Wrecked One of the Most Sacred Places in the Americas

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 12, 2014 4:23 AM GMT
    How idiotic do you have to be?

    http://gizmodo.com/how-greenpeace-wrecked-one-of-the-most-sacred-places-in-1669873583

    But after the organization marched through the sacred Nazca Lines etched into the Peruvian desert for a climate protest, capturing it all on camera with a drone, you have to wonder what the hell they were thinking. Greenpeace isn't the best at thinking things through, though.

    In fact, this is far from the first time Greenpeace has screwed up, though this latest episode of Greenpeace Being Reckless is particularly atrocious. The environmental group has a long, long history of insensitive or poorly-staged actions, ranging from big—like helping to destroy a GMO crop designed to prevent blindness—to small—like papering a small town with posters the day after a community cleanup.

    In case you missed io9's post about the outrage, here's a recap: The environmental activists wanted to send a message to government officials from around with world who are attending a climate change conference in Lima this week. So they headed to the Nazca Desert, one of the most famous and archaeologically significant sites in Peru, to lay down a bunch of yellow banners that spelled out: "TIME FOR CHANGE! THE FUTURE IS RENEWABLE! GREENPEACE."

    The message is practically on top of the hummingbird geoglyph, which is now surrounded by their footprints. And the irony is thick. The future may be renewable, but these fragile, ancient drawings are not.

    "This has been done without any respect for our laws," Peru's deputy minister for culture Luis Jaime Castillo told the press, calling Greenpeace's actions "thoughtless, insensitive, illegal, irresponsible and absolutely pre-meditated." He explained further: "It was done in the middle of the night. They went ahead and stepped on our hummingbird, and looking at the pictures we can see there's very severe damage. Nobody can go on these lines without permission—not even the president of Peru!"
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    Dec 12, 2014 4:43 AM GMT
    One of my favorites was back in the 90's when they halted a timber sale to "save" a nearby owl next. Then to celebrate, they had a rock concert right in front of the damned thing. icon_rolleyes.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 12, 2014 6:14 AM GMT
    [quote][cite]mindgarden said[/cite]One of my favorites was back in the 90's when they halted a timber sale to "save" a nearby owl next. Then to celebrate, they had a rock concert right in front of the damned thing. icon_rolleyes.gif[/quote

    Nest? But ain't people wonderful?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 12, 2014 3:03 PM GMT
    More:

    http://io9.com/this-greenpeace-stunt-may-have-irreparably-damaged-peru-1669728616
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 12, 2014 5:10 PM GMT
    If it was a fracking company doing damage to the glyphs, Riddler would have been silent.
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    Dec 12, 2014 6:31 PM GMT
    Haven't they heard of Photoshop?


  • bro4bro

    Posts: 1033

    Dec 12, 2014 8:18 PM GMT
    The future may be renewable, but unfortunately, the past is not.

    This is every bit as stupid as the film crew that broke a piece off a Macchu Pichu temple while filming a beer commercial.

    The difference is that these hypocritical idiots pretend their criminal acts are justified because they're making the world a better place.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4862

    Dec 12, 2014 10:18 PM GMT
    riddler78 saidHow idiotic do you have to be?

    http://gizmodo.com/how-greenpeace-wrecked-one-of-the-most-sacred-places-in-1669873583

    But after the organization marched through the sacred Nazca Lines etched into the Peruvian desert for a climate protest, capturing it all on camera with a drone, you have to wonder what the hell they were thinking. Greenpeace isn't the best at thinking things through, though.

    In fact, this is far from the first time Greenpeace has screwed up, though this latest episode of Greenpeace Being Reckless is particularly atrocious. The environmental group has a long, long history of insensitive or poorly-staged actions, ranging from big—like helping to destroy a GMO crop designed to prevent blindness—to small—like papering a small town with posters the day after a community cleanup.

    In case you missed io9's post about the outrage, here's a recap: The environmental activists wanted to send a message to government officials from around with world who are attending a climate change conference in Lima this week. So they headed to the Nazca Desert, one of the most famous and archaeologically significant sites in Peru, to lay down a bunch of yellow banners that spelled out: "TIME FOR CHANGE! THE FUTURE IS RENEWABLE! GREENPEACE."

    The message is practically on top of the hummingbird geoglyph, which is now surrounded by their footprints. And the irony is thick. The future may be renewable, but these fragile, ancient drawings are not.

    "This has been done without any respect for our laws," Peru's deputy minister for culture Luis Jaime Castillo told the press, calling Greenpeace's actions "thoughtless, insensitive, illegal, irresponsible and absolutely pre-meditated." He explained further: "It was done in the middle of the night. They went ahead and stepped on our hummingbird, and looking at the pictures we can see there's very severe damage. Nobody can go on these lines without permission—not even the president of Peru!"


    Because of action by Greenpeace and other environmental groups, golden rice, which unlike other verities of rice contains vitamin A because a carrot gene has been spliced into it, has been banned in many countries including India. The result is that many people are disabled or have died.
  • KissTheSky

    Posts: 1980

    Dec 13, 2014 12:30 AM GMT
    Any sort of evidence that the site was actually damaged?
    In the photos I've seen in the news coverage, it looks exactly the same.
    Laying a few cloth letters on top of some rocks for a couple of hours doesn't sound like the end of the world to me.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 13, 2014 1:52 AM GMT
    What's the problem liberals. Part of liberal progressivism is to disregard, burn or destroy anything old like:

    The American Flag
    The US Constitution
    The Bible
    Santa Claus
    Christmas
    Anyone over 75yo
    Anyone not yet born
    Anyone else's tradition such as not stomping all over ancient sacred grounds
    Anyone else's free speech except the liberal mantra
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4862

    Dec 13, 2014 3:31 AM GMT
    mx5guynj saidWhat's the problem liberals. Part of liberal progressivism is to disregard, burn or destroy anything old like:

    The American Flag
    The US Constitution
    The Bible
    Santa Claus
    Christmas
    Anyone over 75yo
    Anyone not yet born
    Anyone else's tradition such as not stomping all over ancient sacred grounds
    Anyone else's free speech except the liberal mantra


    That's strange. A good friend of mine, who is liberal, is a strong exponent of historic preservation and has a Packard Patrician.
  • bro4bro

    Posts: 1033

    Dec 13, 2014 4:20 AM GMT
    KissTheSky saidLaying a few cloth letters on top of some rocks for a couple of hours doesn't sound like the end of the world to me.


    OK, you obviously don't understand the nature of this site.

    This is not "Laying a few cloth letters on top of some rocks."

    The Nazca Lines exist in a very fragile desert landscape. There is a very thin top layer of reddish soil, on top of a gray/whitish base. When you walk along the ground, you break through the red layer, exposing the lighter colored base. That is exactly how the lines were made. They are not carved into rock. They are paths made by people walking in a pattern.

    The signs Greenpeace put up did not do the damage. The people tromping around in the dirt did. And just because you can't see it from aerial photos taken thousands of feet up, doesn't mean there isn't any damage.

    This is an extremely fragile site. And an extremely important site, unique in the entire world.

    The Greenpeace demonstrators were thoughtless, arrogant idiots.
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    Dec 13, 2014 12:36 PM GMT
    sftgfop saidHaven't they heard of Photoshop?


    Exactly what I thought when I saw the pic earlier this week.

    That said, Riddy's indignant posts regarding, say, the environmental impact of Canadian oil sand developments are conspicuous by their absence.
    Tar%20Sands%20by%20Garth%20Lenz_0.jpg
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 13, 2014 1:32 PM GMT
    bro4bro said
    KissTheSky saidLaying a few cloth letters on top of some rocks for a couple of hours doesn't sound like the end of the world to me.


    OK, you obviously don't understand the nature of this site.

    This is not "Laying a few cloth letters on top of some rocks."

    The Nazca Lines exist in a very fragile desert landscape. There is a very thin top layer of reddish soil, on top of a gray/whitish base. When you walk along the ground, you break through the red layer, exposing the lighter colored base. That is exactly how the lines were made. They are not carved into rock. They are paths made by people walking in a pattern.

    The signs Greenpeace put up did not do the damage. The people tromping around in the dirt did. And just because you can't see it from aerial photos taken thousands of feet up, doesn't mean there isn't any damage.

    This is an extremely fragile site. And an extremely important site, unique in the entire world.

    The Greenpeace demonstrators were thoughtless, arrogant idiots.


    Also, it's a really fragile ecosystem composed of 'crust-fungi'. It's why on lots of USA National Parks in dry, arid conditions (deserts) they ask you to always stay on the path. These communities are fundamental for the ecosystem and take hundreds of years to grow.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14336

    Dec 13, 2014 7:45 PM GMT
    mx5guynj saidWhat's the problem liberals. Part of liberal progressivism is to disregard, burn or destroy anything old like:

    The American Flag
    The US Constitution
    The Bible
    Santa Claus
    Christmas
    Anyone over 75yo
    Anyone not yet born
    Anyone else's tradition such as not stomping all over ancient sacred grounds
    Anyone else's free speech except the liberal mantra
    Give him time, MinneapolisMotorMouth (HottJoe) will be on here covering up, twisting around, and justifying everything that his ultra liberal groups have done in the name of saving the earth.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 13, 2014 9:47 PM GMT
    [quote][cite]FRE0 said[/cite]
    mx5guynj saidWhat's the problem liberals. Part of liberal progressivism is to disregard, burn or destroy anything old like:

    The American Flag
    The US Constitution
    The Bible
    Santa Claus
    Christmas
    Anyone over 75yo
    Anyone not yet born
    Anyone else's tradition such as not stomping all over ancient sacred grounds
    Anyone else's free speech except the liberal mantra


    So speaking only for myself and not ALL progressive liberals:

    I like the American flag and love the country it symbolizes. But because I also honor and respect the Constitution, I support its first amendment which gives all Americans the right to protest their government...and distasteful as it may be, that protest can include flag burning. Free speech can be interpreted many ways. As you know, SCOTUS recently decided that bribing politicians w money is a form of free speech. Oh and while we're discussing the constitution, you may want to read the second amendment... you know, the part that talks about a WELL REGULATED militia. What does 'regulated' mean to you?

    I don't want to burn or destroy the bible, it's a historical book of stories. If only more people who claim to believe in it would actually follow the teachings of the man named Jesus and feed/clothe the poor, etc....instead of using it as a platform for hate, that would be great.

    My mom is 76. I sure don't want to burn or destroy her. Well, maybe sometimes. The republican Party on the other hand seems pretty hell bent on doing away w social security and medicare, just ask Paul Ryan. I wonder how much commercial insurance premiums would be for a 76 year old. Gee, I guess conservative neocons don't care about those over 75.

    Who doesn't like Santa? The U.S. economy depends on him and on Xmas. Speaking of religious holidays...we liberal progressives believe everyone has a right to celebrate any and all of their reigious holidays. We just want you to respect the fact the others don't believe in your traditions and therefore don't want you to impose them on us in government or school venues. I mean our founders who wrote the Constitution, and who were mostly atheist, though it was so important to keep religion and government separate, that they included an amendment addressing that very issue right smack dab into the document.

    And as a firm supporter of civil liberties, I support everyone else's free speech rights. I would support the right of the KKK to march down my street, although I might turn on my irrigation system.

    So there you have it buddy. A little bit more accurate representation of a liberal progressive mentality.

    Incidentally, what Greenpeace did in the Peruvian desert was fucking stupid!
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4862

    Dec 13, 2014 10:04 PM GMT
    Koastal said[quote][cite]FRE0 said[/cite]
    mx5guynj saidWhat's the problem liberals. Part of liberal progressivism is to disregard, burn or destroy anything old like:

    The American Flag
    The US Constitution
    The Bible
    Santa Claus
    Christmas
    Anyone over 75yo
    Anyone not yet born
    Anyone else's tradition such as not stomping all over ancient sacred grounds
    Anyone else's free speech except the liberal mantra


    So speaking only for myself and not ALL progressive liberals:

    I like the American flag and love the country it symbolizes. But because I also honor and respect the Constitution, I support its first amendment which gives all Americans the right to protest their government...and distasteful as it may be, that protest can include flag burning. Free speech can be interpreted many ways. As you know, SCOTUS recently decided that bribing politicians w money is a form of free speech. Oh and while we're discussing the constitution, you may want to read the second amendment... you know, the part that talks about a WELL REGULATED militia. What does 'regulated' mean to you?

    I don't want to burn or destroy the bible, it's a historical book of stories. If only more people who claim to believe in it would actually follow the teachings of the man named Jesus and feed/clothe the poor, etc....instead of using it as a platform for hate, that would be great.

    My mom is 76. I sure don't want to burn or destroy her. Well, maybe sometimes. The republican Party on the other hand seems pretty hell bent on doing away w social security and medicare, just ask Paul Ryan. I wonder how much commercial insurance premiums would be for a 76 year old. Gee, I guess conservative neocons don't care about those over 75.

    Who doesn't like Santa? The U.S. economy depends on him and on Xmas. Speaking of religious holidays...we liberal progressives believe everyone has a right to celebrate any and all of their reigious holidays. We just want you to respect the fact the others don't believe in your traditions and therefore don't want you to impose them on us in government or school venues. I mean our founders who wrote the Constitution, and who were mostly atheist, though it was so important to keep religion and government separate, that they included an amendment addressing that very issue right smack dab into the document.

    And as a firm supporter of civil liberties, I support everyone else's free speech rights. I would support the right of the KKK to march down my street, although I might turn on my irrigation system.

    So there you have it buddy. A little bit more accurate representation of a liberal progressive mentality.

    Incidentally, what Greenpeace did in the Peruvian desert was fucking stupid!


    Good point. One of the problems is that many Christians do not follow the teachings of Jesus. Instead, they try to read things into the Book of Revelation that the writer never intended, or search the OT to find support what they already believe. The command of Jesus to love our neighbors is absolutely paramount yet is often overlooked. It is a good rule for everyone, not just Christians.

    Social Security helps people of all ages. Were it not for social security, people with aging parents would have to spend more money to help their aging parents.
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    Dec 13, 2014 10:07 PM GMT
    sftgfop said
    bro4bro said
    KissTheSky saidLaying a few cloth letters on top of some rocks for a couple of hours doesn't sound like the end of the world to me.


    OK, you obviously don't understand the nature of this site.

    This is not "Laying a few cloth letters on top of some rocks."

    The Nazca Lines exist in a very fragile desert landscape. There is a very thin top layer of reddish soil, on top of a gray/whitish base. When you walk along the ground, you break through the red layer, exposing the lighter colored base. That is exactly how the lines were made. They are not carved into rock. They are paths made by people walking in a pattern.

    The signs Greenpeace put up did not do the damage. The people tromping around in the dirt did. And just because you can't see it from aerial photos taken thousands of feet up, doesn't mean there isn't any damage.

    This is an extremely fragile site. And an extremely important site, unique in the entire world.

    The Greenpeace demonstrators were thoughtless, arrogant idiots.


    Also, it's a really fragile ecosystem composed of 'crust-fungi'. It's why on lots of USA National Parks in dry, arid conditions (deserts) they ask you to always stay on the path. These communities are fundamental for the ecosystem and take hundreds of years to grow.


    In a way it's both comical and scary the extent some liberals here will try to justify or at least minimize the idiocy here. The worst I think was their destruction of golden rice plants. It's like they're more interested in the alleviating the guilt of rich white people than you know, actually making a difference in the world.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Dec 13, 2014 10:25 PM GMT
    That is terrible. Are any kind of charges being pressed?

    Anyway, the organization screwed up, but it's not really sensible to demonize environmentalists, in general... There is currently an air quality warning in my state in effect through Monday, due to smog. It's sickening to be breathing toxic air, but there is no escaping it.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Dec 13, 2014 10:27 PM GMT
    riddler78 said
    sftgfop said
    bro4bro said
    KissTheSky saidLaying a few cloth letters on top of some rocks for a couple of hours doesn't sound like the end of the world to me.


    OK, you obviously don't understand the nature of this site.

    This is not "Laying a few cloth letters on top of some rocks."

    The Nazca Lines exist in a very fragile desert landscape. There is a very thin top layer of reddish soil, on top of a gray/whitish base. When you walk along the ground, you break through the red layer, exposing the lighter colored base. That is exactly how the lines were made. They are not carved into rock. They are paths made by people walking in a pattern.

    The signs Greenpeace put up did not do the damage. The people tromping around in the dirt did. And just because you can't see it from aerial photos taken thousands of feet up, doesn't mean there isn't any damage.

    This is an extremely fragile site. And an extremely important site, unique in the entire world.

    The Greenpeace demonstrators were thoughtless, arrogant idiots.


    Also, it's a really fragile ecosystem composed of 'crust-fungi'. It's why on lots of USA National Parks in dry, arid conditions (deserts) they ask you to always stay on the path. These communities are fundamental for the ecosystem and take hundreds of years to grow.


    In a way it's both comical and scary the extent some liberals here will try to justify or at least minimize the idiocy here. The worst I think was their destruction of golden rice plants. It's like they're more interested in the alleviating the guilt of rich white people than you know, actually making a difference in the world.

    I thought you liked rich white people.icon_rolleyes.gif
  • tj85016

    Posts: 4123

    Dec 13, 2014 10:39 PM GMT
    didn't Jesus say "go forth and fuck up the World"?

    well, we have
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Dec 13, 2014 10:41 PM GMT
    tj85016 saiddidn't Jesus say "go forth and fuck up the World"?

    well, we have

    Yeah he said that right after he said to kill the gays.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4862

    Dec 13, 2014 11:17 PM GMT
    riddler78 said
    sftgfop said
    bro4bro said
    KissTheSky saidLaying a few cloth letters on top of some rocks for a couple of hours doesn't sound like the end of the world to me.


    OK, you obviously don't understand the nature of this site.

    This is not "Laying a few cloth letters on top of some rocks."

    The Nazca Lines exist in a very fragile desert landscape. There is a very thin top layer of reddish soil, on top of a gray/whitish base. When you walk along the ground, you break through the red layer, exposing the lighter colored base. That is exactly how the lines were made. They are not carved into rock. They are paths made by people walking in a pattern.

    The signs Greenpeace put up did not do the damage. The people tromping around in the dirt did. And just because you can't see it from aerial photos taken thousands of feet up, doesn't mean there isn't any damage.

    This is an extremely fragile site. And an extremely important site, unique in the entire world.

    The Greenpeace demonstrators were thoughtless, arrogant idiots.


    Also, it's a really fragile ecosystem composed of 'crust-fungi'. It's why on lots of USA National Parks in dry, arid conditions (deserts) they ask you to always stay on the path. These communities are fundamental for the ecosystem and take hundreds of years to grow.


    In a way it's both comical and scary the extent some liberals here will try to justify or at least minimize the idiocy here. The worst I think was their destruction of golden rice plants. It's like they're more interested in the alleviating the guilt of rich white people than you know, actually making a difference in the world.


    ^^ This ^^
  • theonewhoknoc...

    Posts: 713

    Dec 13, 2014 11:29 PM GMT
    Seems like at least 2 members have attacked OP for not being on top of other environmental issues... what's the deal there?? icon_question.gif
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Dec 13, 2014 11:34 PM GMT
    FRE0 said
    riddler78 said
    sftgfop said
    bro4bro said
    KissTheSky saidLaying a few cloth letters on top of some rocks for a couple of hours doesn't sound like the end of the world to me.


    OK, you obviously don't understand the nature of this site.

    This is not "Laying a few cloth letters on top of some rocks."

    The Nazca Lines exist in a very fragile desert landscape. There is a very thin top layer of reddish soil, on top of a gray/whitish base. When you walk along the ground, you break through the red layer, exposing the lighter colored base. That is exactly how the lines were made. They are not carved into rock. They are paths made by people walking in a pattern.

    The signs Greenpeace put up did not do the damage. The people tromping around in the dirt did. And just because you can't see it from aerial photos taken thousands of feet up, doesn't mean there isn't any damage.

    This is an extremely fragile site. And an extremely important site, unique in the entire world.

    The Greenpeace demonstrators were thoughtless, arrogant idiots.


    Also, it's a really fragile ecosystem composed of 'crust-fungi'. It's why on lots of USA National Parks in dry, arid conditions (deserts) they ask you to always stay on the path. These communities are fundamental for the ecosystem and take hundreds of years to grow.


    In a way it's both comical and scary the extent some liberals here will try to justify or at least minimize the idiocy here. The worst I think was their destruction of golden rice plants. It's like they're more interested in the alleviating the guilt of rich white people than you know, actually making a difference in the world.


    ^^ This ^^

    I call foul. One of you is in bed with fracking and the other in bed with nuclear. If rich white people are the guiltiest, it's only because they polluted the most. But the idea that only rich people care about the environment and the message of Green Peace is false. Human beings have an attachment to earth and environmentalists come in all walks of life. What you call guilt is actually your own guilt making you cynical.