another big gay household tip

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 12, 2014 2:53 PM GMT
    despite my husband's 20min showers there is still LOTS of soap accumulation. To clean this totally w/o effort use an old wash cloth rag and a bit of low velocity paint thinner. The accumulated soap scum will dissolve super easy. The inexpensive paint thinners are made in VietNam, undefined chemical makeup, wear disposable gloves.
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    Dec 12, 2014 3:53 PM GMT
    Sort of like shooting a pigeon with an elephant gun?
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    Dec 12, 2014 6:44 PM GMT
    Im thinking it not too environmentally friendly to be washing paint thinner down the drain.

    Apple Cider vinegar works just as well and is a lot safer.
  • secondstartot...

    Posts: 1314

    Dec 12, 2014 6:46 PM GMT
    20 minute showers ?? holy moly thats a lot of water
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    Dec 12, 2014 8:50 PM GMT
    pellaz saidmy water company has a flat fee

    icon_lol.gif

    And your husband is a big truck who needs 20 mins in shower?
    You are hiding the fact that you guys fuck under the shower.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Dec 12, 2014 10:09 PM GMT
    pellaz saidi have rental units actually.


    another big gay tip:
    despite my husband's 20min showers there is still LOTS of soap accumulation. To clean this totally w/o effort use an old wash cloth rag and a bit of low velocity paint thinner. The accumulated soap scum will dissolve super easy. The inexpensive paint thinners are made in VietNam, undefined chemical makeup, wear disposable gloves.


    Probably the soap accumulation can be prevented by using a liquid body wash instead of bar soap.

    A 20 minute shower doesn't necessarily use much water. It depends on whether the water is actually turned on all the time.
  • BAHBAA

    Posts: 122

    Dec 12, 2014 10:54 PM GMT
    yes! thank you

    I have been cleaning my shower with a cleaner that warned "AVOID ALL SKIN CONTACT WEAR PROTECTIVE EYEWEAR" but I can't find it anymore I think it was discontinued.

    Will try the paint thinner.
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    Dec 13, 2014 2:06 AM GMT
    Don't use it in an acrylic base shower, it will eat the plastic icon_eek.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 13, 2014 3:13 AM GMT
    What's wrong with 20 min showers?
    .
    .
    .
    .
    (...mind you I live in a temperate rainforest area so it's not like there's ever going to be a shortage of water here. icon_smile.gif )
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Dec 13, 2014 3:27 AM GMT
    pellaz saidi have rental units actually.


    another big gay tip:
    despite my husband's 20min showers there is still LOTS of soap accumulation. To clean this totally w/o effort use an old wash cloth rag and a bit of low velocity paint thinner. The accumulated soap scum will dissolve super easy. The inexpensive paint thinners are made in VietNam, undefined chemical makeup, wear disposable gloves.


    Probably it is the sodium cyanide in the paint thinner that makes it so effective.
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    Dec 13, 2014 4:55 AM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    pellaz saidi have rental units actually.


    another big gay tip:
    despite my husband's 20min showers there is still LOTS of soap accumulation. To clean this totally w/o effort use an old wash cloth rag and a bit of low velocity paint thinner. The accumulated soap scum will dissolve super easy. The inexpensive paint thinners are made in VietNam, undefined chemical makeup, wear disposable gloves.


    This is a horrible idea. Advising people to flush paint thinner down the drain? That toxic poison should be used minimally.



    When I use paint thinner for carpentry work I don't dump it down the drain. I keep recycling it and reusing it.

    I'd have to check but this might be classified as illegal dumping of toxic materials into our water supply. It would definitely have disastrous effects on the eco systems wherever your used water dumps into. Imagine if tens of thousands or several hundred thousand people within just one city adopted this method of cleaning their shower walls.

    PLEASE DON'T DO THIS.


    Well thank god someone else sees the harm in this!! icon_rolleyes.gif
  • secondstartot...

    Posts: 1314

    Dec 13, 2014 5:25 AM GMT
    I live in a desert ...wasting water bothers me a bit

    also

    Freshwater Crisis

    http://environment.nationalgeographic.com/environment/freshwater/freshwater-crisis/


    thewaterprojectClean, safe drinking water is scarce. Today, nearly 1 billion people in the developing world don't have access to it. Yet, we take it for granted, we waste it, and we even pay too much to drink it from little plastic bottles.
    Water is the foundation of life. And still today, all around the world, far too many people spend their entire day searching for it.
    In places like sub-Saharan Africa, time lost gathering water and suffering from water-borne diseases is limiting people's true potential.
    Education is lost to sickness. Economic development is lost while people merely try to survive. But it doesn't have to be like this. It's needless suffering.


    http://thewaterproject.org/water_scarcity
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 13, 2014 12:09 PM GMT
    Quick spray with this around the tiles and bath after showering keeps them gleaming. No elbow grease required and environmentally pretty sound.
    LN_022006_BP_11.jpg
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    Dec 13, 2014 2:07 PM GMT
    Ex_Mil8 saidQuick spray with this around the tiles and bath after showering keeps them gleaming. No elbow grease required and environmentally pretty sound.
    LN_022006_BP_11.jpg

    Agree, paint thinner is not something that should be flushed down the drain and into the water treatment plant. Plus it's flammable, and the fumes can be unhealthy to breath in a confined space.

    A daily method that can reduce having to use a cleaner so often is to wipe down the walls, and glass doors if equipped, with a rubber squeegee. I've been doing that for years, and now I'm seeing squeegees sold alongside the bathroom cleaning materials, for just this purpose.
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    Dec 13, 2014 2:44 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidAnd why is this in the Food and Recipes section?



    Because it's going into our water supply which will end up in our food. Duhhh
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 13, 2014 2:45 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidAnd why is this in the Food and Recipes section?

    The same reason Israel Vs Palestine Vs Hamas is in All things gay section.
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    Dec 13, 2014 2:51 PM GMT
    OP - It's not about the expense. Even if you get a flat fee from your water supplier, a 20 minute shower is unnecessary and damaging to the environment. And now you're dumping hazardous chemicals down the drain too? Guess where that paint thinner ends up? It goes into our rivers and streams and water supply. You're not only poisoning us but all the animals that depend on that water supply too. Not to mention the crops we grow for food end up with these chemicals inside them too. In fact, this is illegal.

    I keep a bottle of vinegar/water solution under my sink and it works just fine if you spray it each time you get out of the shower. If there are any stubborn spots I sprinkle a bit of baking soda after spraying, then wipe it away.

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    Dec 13, 2014 7:48 PM GMT
    i am not too sure about the vinegar but will try it. I know paint thinner is faster stronger.

    if a tenant moves out; always some painting to do especially the kitchen or bath. I usually have the paint thinner around from the airless sprayer hose. I want a quality product. Some paint, thinner and cleaning fluids go down the drain.


    my hat is off to anyone who wants to become 63.8% more echo friendly.
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    Dec 13, 2014 7:55 PM GMT
    pellaz saidi am not too sure about the vinegar but will try it. I know paint thinner is faster stronger.

    if a tenant moves out; always some painting to do especially the kitchen or bath. I usually have the paint thinner around from the airless sprayer hose. I want a quality product. Some paint, thinner and cleaning fluids go down the drain.



    *Sigh* Again......you should not be putting toxic chemicals down your drain. (Is there an echo in here?) It's better to wash brushes off outside with a hose but blot as much paint thinner off as possible first. It should be sealed in an airtight container and taken to a hazardous waste facility. If you don't know where one is in your area, call your local Department of Environmental Protection. If for some reason this is not an option, fill the container with cat litter or some other absorbent material and leave the lid off until it dries out. Then seal the can and put it in the trash.
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    Dec 13, 2014 8:46 PM GMT
    go for it:
    pellaz saidmy hat is off to anyone who wants to become 63.8% more echo friendly.



    i mostly shower twice a day.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Dec 13, 2014 9:51 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    pellaz saidi have rental units actually.


    another big gay tip:
    despite my husband's 20min showers there is still LOTS of soap accumulation. To clean this totally w/o effort use an old wash cloth rag and a bit of low velocity paint thinner. The accumulated soap scum will dissolve super easy. The inexpensive paint thinners are made in VietNam, undefined chemical makeup, wear disposable gloves.


    This is a horrible idea. Advising people to flush paint thinner down the drain? That toxic poison should be used minimally.

    When I use paint thinner for carpentry work I don't dump it down the drain. I keep recycling it and reusing it.

    I'd have to check but this might be classified as illegal dumping of toxic materials into our water supply. It would definitely have disastrous effects on the eco systems wherever your used water dumps into. Imagine if tens of thousands or several hundred thousand people within just one city adopted this method of cleaning their shower walls.

    PLEASE DON'T DO THIS.


    It could even damage the plumbing since, except for very olde buildings, drain pipes are usually plastic. The damage would probably occur gradually so it wouldn't be apparent until considerable damage had occurred.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Dec 13, 2014 9:56 PM GMT
    Radd said
    pellaz saidi am not too sure about the vinegar but will try it. I know paint thinner is faster stronger.

    if a tenant moves out; always some painting to do especially the kitchen or bath. I usually have the paint thinner around from the airless sprayer hose. I want a quality product. Some paint, thinner and cleaning fluids go down the drain.



    *Sigh* Again......you should not be putting toxic chemicals down your drain. (Is there an echo in here?) It's better to wash brushes off outside with a hose but blot as much paint thinner off as possible first. It should be sealed in an airtight container and taken to a hazardous waste facility. If you don't know where one is in your area, call your local Department of Environmental Protection. If for some reason this is not an option, fill the container with cat litter or some other absorbent material and leave the lid off until it dries out. Then seal the can and put it in the trash.


    Or use water-base paint that does not require toxic thinners. Walls painted with good water-base paint can be washed without removing the paint since once the paint sets, it becomes water resistant.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 13, 2014 10:17 PM GMT
    Use Scrubbing Bubbles. That foaming action eats through soap scum like nothing. Just spray, wait, and wipe it down with a sponge.

    product-large-scrubbing-bubbles-foaming-
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 13, 2014 10:20 PM GMT
    xrichx saidUse Scrubbing Bubbles. That foaming action eats through soap scum like nothing. Just spray, wait, and wipe it down with a sponge.

    I was thinking the same thing. That stuff really does work.