Chemistry Major

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 13, 2014 1:27 AM GMT
    Is there anyone who is majoring in chemistry?If so, what kinda workplace are u working after graduating with that major?Thank you icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 13, 2014 3:01 PM GMT
    I'm not but ehow knows about 5 kinds of workplace :

    Process and Quality Control Positions. Focus on laboratory work and day-to-day operations. Laboratory work entails typical “bench chemistry.” You may also be given responsibilities relating to finance and inventory aspects of a lab. Chemists in these environments are required to have good hand-eye coordination, intellectual integrity--when experiment results don’t go as planned--and, of course, substantial insight into their fields of study. Quality control positions are likely to involve analytical chemistry, so mathematical and computer/spreadsheet competence will help.

    Teaching and Instruction. Depending on an individual’s interest and qualifications, he or she may teach science classes in elementary and middle schools. High schools, community colleges, and universities all need qualified chemistry teachers. Communicating concepts and getting the point across to students are crucial, as are demonstrating and instilling laboratory safety since chemistry classes typically include labs and demonstrations.

    Research. Emphasis falls on theoretical understanding and scientific/technical communication. Research jobs can go together with instruction at the university level or in corporate/industrial settings. Researchers are the most prominent "experts in the field," especially in a highly specialized subset of chemistry. These positions typically require a doctorate degree, although a master's with substantial experience may suffice (depending on the employer).

    Sales. Sales and persuasion works with the “human element,” negotiating and identifying needs. A chemist needs to be good with people, assertive yet friendly, and able to compose persuasive arguments for or against a purchasing decision. These skills are needed to succeed in chemistry sales. Scientific expertise is applied in the context of identifying the risks and benefits of a given product being applied to a given need.

    Intellectual Property Law. Here, "pure chemistry" interfaces with legal matters, focusing on intellectual property, patents, and copyrights. Chemical companies, law firms, and universities employ people with this expertise. Law school and a background in chemistry are a must. As with sales-related work, there can be a clash of mentalities at work with intellectual property law--thinking like a scientist as opposed to thinking like a lawyer. Success in intellectual property requires being able to see things from a scientific as well as a legal perspective.

    Read more : http://www.ehow.com/list_6183100_jobs-chemistry-majors.html
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 13, 2014 3:04 PM GMT
    I didn't major in chemistry but a close friend of mine did. He got an internship as a chemist for Colgate and they decided to hire him. He ended up getting his PhD in chemistry and he got very far with the company.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 13, 2014 6:27 PM GMT
    fyi:
    chemistry majors make the greatest foodies, for the right person.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 13, 2014 9:48 PM GMT
    I was a Bio major but my first job out of college involved working in a chemistry lab with mostly Chemistry majors. We mostly did typical chem lab stuff all day. I left because I wanted a higher paying job but there were a few opportunities for advancing, like becoming a project manager for clients.
  • JohnDoe9688

    Posts: 118

    Dec 14, 2014 4:02 AM GMT
    Im a biochem major and Im going to grad school after college. If you're really serious about it ten I'd say that's where you should start
  • ai82

    Posts: 183

    Dec 14, 2014 5:32 AM GMT
    You could go into almost anything. I know people who went into pharmacy, medicine and dentistry.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 15, 2014 3:40 AM GMT
    Thanks for the reply .I appreciate it
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 15, 2014 2:45 PM GMT
    Speaking as someone who earned his chemistry degree - I spend 20 years working for a laboratory chemical supplier in production and technical functions. *Now* I'm doing IT support for an entirely different organization - *however*, even if the Chemistry aspect of my training is not getting used now, the mental processes applied to problem-solving, data collection, testing of hypotheses *are* still getting used daily.

    Doctor9