Bridge exercise question

  • Noeton

    Posts: 208

    Dec 13, 2014 1:44 AM GMT
    Hey fitness gurus, can doing a body-weight only bridge do much for you? As in can you actually see muscle gain from this? If so, which muscles? Thanks!

    bridge-exercise.png
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    Dec 13, 2014 2:18 PM GMT
    I imagine that this would only benefit your core (something you seem not to need)----hard to see what other muscle groups are being taxed here
    But as to improving and maintaining flexibility and limberness in general, it seems like a worthwhile exercise for that alone
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    Dec 13, 2014 2:55 PM GMT
    mahler19abig.jpg
    I can't explain what muscles it works but it feels like it's working ALL of them. Although I usually do back bridges where I curl my body so that the floor is touching my forehead and the bridge of my nose. It takes practice to get to that point and if I haven't done them in a while I feel like my neck and shoulders are going to explode, LOL. But they make your whole body feel much harder all over. I would not consider this a "core" exercise. It stretches the abdomen but that's about it really. Your core is at the top where the pressure is the least. You'll feel it more in your quadriceps, shoulders and back because those are the areas that are taking the load. Can't really explain it any better. If you have any wrist or shoulder issues I would start out slowly with this one. It can be taxing on the joints if you're not used to it.
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    Dec 13, 2014 3:06 PM GMT
    I think this exercise is better for flexibility, specifically in the upper and lower back, plus your shoulders, arms, wrists and thighs.
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Dec 13, 2014 4:02 PM GMT
    Definitely a plus on the side of cardiovascular exercise and general stretching, certainly. I would call it a very important part of that area... but as far as resistance training, probably not as effective.

    I would certainly incorporate it, if you like doing it into a broader fitness routine. Great question and fantastic flex exercise!
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    Dec 13, 2014 7:34 PM GMT
    Dunno... they used to have us do those in kindergarden. And scuttle around the room that way. It blew my mind when it was presented somewhere as a "difficult" exercise.

    *crack*

    Uh... oh yeah. icon_redface.gifMaybe I shouldn't have stopped doing them after kindergarden.

    More a flexibility thing, as others mentioned, I think.
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    Dec 13, 2014 7:48 PM GMT
    mindgarden saidDunno... they used to have us do those in kindergarden. And scuttle around the room that way. It blew my mind when it was presented somewhere as a "difficult" exercise.

    *crack*

    Uh... oh yeah. icon_redface.gifMaybe I shouldn't have stopped doing them after kindergarden.

    More a flexibility thing, as others mentioned, I think.



    Try doing them as an adult as shown in the pics I posted and you might reconsider your opinion.
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    Dec 13, 2014 11:00 PM GMT
    mindgarden saidDunno... they used to have us do those in kindergarden. And scuttle around the room that way. It blew my mind when it was presented somewhere as a "difficult" exercise.

    *crack*

    Uh... oh yeah. icon_redface.gifMaybe I shouldn't have stopped doing them after kindergarden.

    More a flexibility thing, as others mentioned, I think.


    As I recall, when I did them in grammar school acrobatics class and in high school gymnastics, they were termed "back bends" (which I could do with ease. I'm not sure I'd try it today!)
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    Dec 14, 2014 4:54 AM GMT
    It's called wheel in yoga and it's often the last exercise before shavasana. (chill out ....dead man's poise) . It seems to engage every muscle so it's great before the big relaxing poise. It is like dips in that it is a bench mark of overall fitness. I do three sets and try to hold for 8-12 breaths. I don't think it builds muscle.




  • Noeton

    Posts: 208

    Dec 14, 2014 6:46 AM GMT
    Thanks everybody, especially Radd. I've been doing these a lot, but only in the last few days, and they seem to be doing something for me... but I can't be quite sure what. And I couldn't find anything on exrx about them. I hold them for as long as possible and squeeze my glutes -- following from the same principle as doing a plank. I feel great after doing them.

    Radd -- that's an awesome variation there... looks intense. I guess I'll have to work up to that.
  • ickymuffin

    Posts: 119

    Dec 14, 2014 9:20 PM GMT
    It really is not nearly as much about increasing strength(though is does strengthen the muscles in your low back) as it is about opening up range of motion and increasing flexibility. Wheel, or dhanurasana opens most of your front body(chest, shoulders, hip flexors) and is great for anyone who has rounded posture from having a chest that is tighter than the back(most of us). To get the most out of it, keep elbows in line with wrist, versus letting them wing out. Also, keep your tail bone tucked so you don't compress your low back.
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    Dec 17, 2014 12:08 AM GMT
    Variations on the bridge, one handed, adding weight, etc., are also great for core from my experience. A strong core lends itself to growth and functionality in many other areas. Good luck!
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    Dec 17, 2014 5:16 AM GMT
    It does *something* for sure.

    tumblr_nc2xw3u1RY1t231szo1_500.jpg

    icon_twisted.gificon_twisted.gificon_twisted.gif
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    Dec 17, 2014 1:46 PM GMT
    SF79 saidIt does *something* for sure.

    tumblr_nc2xw3u1RY1t231szo1_500.jpg

    icon_twisted.gificon_twisted.gificon_twisted.gif



    I'm afraid this poor guy might fall. He looks like he could collapse at any minute. I'm sure he put that yoga mat there for me to lie under him to support him. icon_twisted.gif