Second session with my trainer and I got a light headed and needed to sit down.

  • BlackCoach

    Posts: 37

    Dec 14, 2014 12:07 AM GMT
    Hey guys,today at the end of my workout with my trainer,I got really light headed and the trainer had to help me to his office to for me to recover. I am in great shape in that I run and bicycle. Also,will visit a doctor next week. Does anyone have any ideas of what might be the cause. One thing I know was that didn't drink any water before workout which I should know better and did have a hamburger right before workout. Any suggestions are appreciated.
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    Dec 14, 2014 12:25 AM GMT
    I think you're wise to see your doctor.
    I hope he has the answer.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 14, 2014 2:13 AM GMT
    Its happened to me a couple of times before, especially when I am doing legs. I think I connected mine to not being hydrated enough, but if you are concerned I would certainly repeat the above post and see a doctor.

    Have you taken any new supplements or anything?
  • bro4bro

    Posts: 1035

    Dec 14, 2014 2:36 AM GMT
    Could be dehydration.

    Could be the hamburger you ate (pretty heavy meal right before a hard workout) was diverting blood to your stomach for digestion and not enough was getting to your head.

    Lightheadedness can also be a symptom of an iron deficiency. Iron in your blood carries oxygen. It can only carry so much oxygen before it's burned out and needs to be replaced. If you do a lot of cardio you're putting a heavier load on your blood, and you'll need to replace the iron more quickly.

    I used to get a bit lightheaded sometimes after a very hard cardio session. I started taking an iron supplement (27 mg ferrous sulfate - the little red iron pills you can get at any supermarket). Haven't had the problem since I started taking them.
  • Rhi_Bran

    Posts: 904

    Dec 14, 2014 2:38 AM GMT
    What was the focus of your session? In many people, light-headedness is not uncommon when one starts seriously working out muscle groups that haven't had much attention. A lot of it is because your body isn't used to pumping so much blood to the areas of focus, so your body's materials tend to get redistributed in a way that may leave you dizzy. I know it happened to me when I started doing leg workouts and squats - those are REALLY big muscle groups that, while powerful and efficient when they are on a roll, require great deals of nutrients and oxygen when stressed. I've seen videos of people who momentarily pass out from attempting to do too many squats or squatting too much weight. One's reach exceeding one's grasp and all that.

    Hydration is only a concern if you felt yourself get thirsty during your workout. Perhaps you aren't getting enough electrolytes and micronutrients. A hamburger might make you feel sick in your stomach, but it shouldn't make you feel light-headed.
  • BlackCoch

    Posts: 5

    Dec 14, 2014 1:28 PM GMT
    sftgfop saidIts happened to me a couple of times before, especially when I am doing legs. I think I connected mine to not being hydrated enough, but if you are concerned I would certainly repeat the above post and see a doctor.

    Have you taken any new supplements or anything?


    I haven't taken any supplements. I always get a little light headed when I laying down on the ground and get up.
  • BlackCoch

    Posts: 5

    Dec 14, 2014 1:30 PM GMT
    bro4bro saidCould be dehydration.

    Could be the hamburger you ate (pretty heavy meal right before a hard workout) was diverting blood to your stomach for digestion and not enough was getting to your head.

    Lightheadedness can also be a symptom of an iron deficiency. Iron in your blood carries oxygen. It can only carry so much oxygen before it's burned out and needs to be replaced. If you do a lot of cardio you're putting a heavier load on your blood, and you'll need to replace the iron more quickly.

    I used to get a bit lightheaded sometimes after a very hard cardio session. I started taking an iron supplement (27 mg ferrous sulfate - the little red iron pills you can get at any supermarket). Haven't had the problem since I started taking them.


    Thanks for you response and will try the iron it certainly can't hurt. Also, the hamburger could have been the issue. I was feeling a little hungry before the work out and felt going in hungry wouldn't be the best.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 14, 2014 1:35 PM GMT
    Is it BlackCoach, the OP, or BlackCoch, per the last 2 responses? Being aged 41 and 35, respectively, although both in Atlanta.
  • BlackCoch

    Posts: 5

    Dec 14, 2014 1:39 PM GMT
    Rhi_Bran saidWhat was the focus of your session? In many people, light-headedness is not uncommon when one starts seriously working out muscle groups that haven't had much attention. A lot of it is because your body isn't used to pumping so much blood to the areas of focus, so your body's materials tend to get redistributed in a way that may leave you dizzy. I know it happened to me when I started doing leg workouts and squats - those are REALLY big muscle groups that, while powerful and efficient when they are on a roll, require great deals of nutrients and oxygen when stressed. I've seen videos of people who momentarily pass out from attempting to do too many squats or squatting too much weight. One's reach exceeding one's grasp and all that.

    Hydration is only a concern if you felt yourself get thirsty during your workout. Perhaps you aren't getting enough electrolytes and micronutrients. A hamburger might make you feel sick in your stomach, but it shouldn't make you feel light-headed.


    The focus of my training has been CORE exercises. However, i did have a sweat shirt on and was sweating badly at the end

    We started out warming up on a row machine, then i did some more warm ups. then did an exercise like a push up but you stay in the pushed up positing and one hand touches the other shoulder. then we did some dead lifts at 110# and 135#(not at the same time and i never done dead lifts before) then i walked across the room doing opposite knee and elbow. then i got some water and then did another set up right arm touches left shoulder in a pushed up position. At the end i grew tired and got light headed all of a sudden. Was sweating and clamly and hard to breath but 5 minutes later was fine.
  • BlackCoch

    Posts: 5

    Dec 14, 2014 1:40 PM GMT
    Art_Deco saidIs it BlackCoach, the OP, or BlackCoch, per the last 2 responses? Being aged 41 and 35, respectively, although both in Atlanta.


    Black Coach the OP
  • BlackCoach

    Posts: 37

    Dec 14, 2014 1:47 PM GMT
    Oh, i forgot i created the Blackcoh with the misspelling.. lol
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Dec 14, 2014 9:08 PM GMT
    Thirst is not always an adequate indicator of dehydration. Sometimes it is necessary to drink when not thirsty to avoid dehydration. Dehydration can cause light headedness, especially when standing up quickly when hot. Exercising large muscle groups very hard can also cause light headedness.

    Most likely there is no serious problem, but getting it checked out would be a reasonable thing to do.
  • PTNoge

    Posts: 58

    Dec 15, 2014 5:18 PM GMT
    This is common for people starting a new exercise routine. If you had just done cardio in the past, then your body is not used to the type of workout your trainer did, especially if you were doing large muscle groups with little rest time.

    There are different types of muscle fibers and cardio mostly focuses on the type 1 muscle. However, resistance training usually focuses mostly on the type 2 muscle fibers (a, b, x), however, these muscle fibers don't use energy as efficiently. During the non-aerobic breakdown of energy, circulating blood becomes acidic, it makes the individual light headed, and have nausea.

    If it happens again, lie on your back and wait for your body to recover. Ease back into the workout. Eventually, your body will tolerate the increased acidity in your blood during workouts.

    It happens a lot when individuals are not used to working large muscle groups: legs, chest, back.

    Have your trainer increase your rest interval until you can tolerate shorter rest times.

    Cheers,
    Chris

    (BTW, I have a PhD in muscle metabolism and am a CSCS and CISSN, so I'm not just writing some random old-wives tale. If you want the sources let me know, and I'll dig up the studies.)

    Good luck!
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Dec 15, 2014 6:42 PM GMT
    PTNoge saidThis is common for people starting a new exercise routine. If you had just done cardio in the past, then your body is not used to the type of workout your trainer did, especially if you were doing large muscle groups with little rest time.

    There are different types of muscle fibers and cardio mostly focuses on the type 1 muscle. However, resistance training usually focuses mostly on the type 2 muscle fibers (a, b, x), however, these muscle fibers don't use energy as efficiently. During the non-aerobic breakdown of energy, circulating blood becomes acidic, it makes the individual light headed, and have nausea.

    If it happens again, lie on your back and wait for your body to recover. Ease back into the workout. Eventually, your body will tolerate the increased acidity in your blood during workouts.

    It happens a lot when individuals are not used to working large muscle groups: legs, chest, back.

    Have your trainer increase your rest interval until you can tolerate shorter rest times.

    Cheers,
    Chris

    (BTW, I have a PhD in muscle metabolism and am a CSCS and CISSN, so I'm not just writing some random old-wives tale. If you want the sources let me know, and I'll dig up the studies.)

    Good luck!


    Nausea can also occur with aerobic exercise.

    When I was a preppy, the track team would begin working out in the spring after having had little or no aerobic exercise for about nine months. Some of the guys, while running, would become nauseated and some would actually vomit. All had taken the required physical education classes before the track season, so that proves that the physical education classes actually did little or nothing to maintain fitness.

    It is likely that resting for a few minutes after doing three sets of an exercise would reduce the problem. After becoming accustomed to the routine, that may no longer be necessary. A more thorough warm up before lifting could also help. You could try walking briskly for a few minutes then jogging at an easy pace for about 15 minutes before beginning your lifting routine. That should not leave you too tired to interfere with your lifting.
  • PTNoge

    Posts: 58

    Dec 15, 2014 8:06 PM GMT


    Nausea can also occur with aerobic exercise.

    When I was a preppy, the track team would begin working out in the spring after having had little or no aerobic exercise for about nine months. Some of the guys, while running, would become nauseated and some would actually vomit.




    This is the same phenomenon which I wrote about, as sprinting, depending on the distance, primarily uses the type 2 muscle fibers.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 15, 2014 11:48 PM GMT
    Your are probably on the right track with the water and the hamburger. Remember the guy who wrote Supersize Me? If you haven't read it you should. He was in super shape and was admitted to the ER for symptoms of a heart attack after eating nothing but burgers and other fast food for 30 days. Your body gets NOTHING from burgers that lends itself to growth and maintenance of your body but fat and protein. Fat and protein cause inflammation and plaque which will eventually make you sick. Your body was telling your this.

    So next time I suggest that you consume only vegetable juice (carrots, green, beets etc.) prior to your workout (notice I left out fruit juice) and eat a small amount of protein (not beef which has been linked to cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's, prostate cancer and more) with a LOT of vegetables after your workout and I bet you never feel crappy like that again.

    To the best of health!

    Dr. Randy
  • BlackCoach

    Posts: 37

    Dec 16, 2014 3:44 AM GMT
    FRE0 saidThirst is not always an adequate indicator of dehydration. Sometimes it is necessary to drink when not thirsty to avoid dehydration. Dehydration can cause light headedness, especially when standing up quickly when hot. Exercising large muscle groups very hard can also cause light headedness.

    Most likely there is no serious problem, but getting it checked out would be a reasonable thing to do.
    Thanks for your help!!
  • BlackCoach

    Posts: 37

    Dec 16, 2014 3:51 AM GMT
    PTNoge said

    Nausea can also occur with aerobic exercise.

    When I was a preppy, the track team would begin working out in the spring after having had little or no aerobic exercise for about nine months. Some of the guys, while running, would become nauseated and some would actually vomit.




    This is the same phenomenon which I wrote about, as sprinting, depending on the distance, primarily uses the type 2 muscle fibers.


    Yes I experienced that myself when starting cycling or running season. Seen some of the guys who run on the cross team do that. I have been lighted headed and know it goes with the territory but never to the point of fainting. I think the trainer was more concerned than I.


    Thanks for your help!!
  • BlackCoach

    Posts: 37

    Dec 16, 2014 3:54 AM GMT
    Randynice saidYour are probably on the right track with the water and the hamburger. Remember the guy who wrote Supersize Me? If you haven't read it you should. He was in super shape and was admitted to the ER for symptoms of a heart attack after eating nothing but burgers and other fast food for 30 days. Your body gets NOTHING from burgers that lends itself to growth and maintenance of your body but fat and protein. Fat and protein cause inflammation and plaque which will eventually make you sick. Your body was telling your this.

    So next time I suggest that you consume only vegetable juice (carrots, green, beets etc.) prior to your workout (notice I left out fruit juice) and eat a small amount of protein (not beef which has been linked to cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's, prostate cancer and more) with a LOT of vegetables after your workout and I bet you never feel crappy like that again.

    To the best of health!

    Dr. Randy


    Thanks for your help but where would I get my proteins? Trainer says I need to consume more proteins
  • BlackCoach

    Posts: 37

    Dec 16, 2014 3:58 AM GMT
    PTNoge saidThis is common for people starting a new exercise routine. If you had just done cardio in the past, then your body is not used to the type of workout your trainer did, especially if you were doing large muscle groups with little rest time.

    There are different types of muscle fibers and cardio mostly focuses on the type 1 muscle. However, resistance training usually focuses mostly on the type 2 muscle fibers (a, b, x), however, these muscle fibers don't use energy as efficiently. During the non-aerobic breakdown of energy, circulating blood becomes acidic, it makes the individual light headed, and have nausea.

    If it happens again, lie on your back and wait for your body to recover. Ease back into the workout. Eventually, your body will tolerate the increased acidity in your blood during workouts.

    It happens a lot when individuals are not used to working large muscle groups: legs, chest, back.

    Have your trainer increase your rest interval until you can tolerate shorter rest times.

    Cheers,
    Chris

    (BTW, I have a PhD in muscle metabolism and am a CSCS and CISSN, so I'm not just writing some random old-wives tale. If you want the sources let me know, and I'll dig up the studies.)

    Good luck!
    Thanks for your help and advice

    I think the main suggestions I should try are:

    Drink Water

    Hamburger might not be the best meal before a work out
    more rest between reps

    Lay down on my back if I start feeling really light headed. I felt worse when the trainer had me walk to his office instead of staying right there

    Supplements