HIV most often passed on by younger gay men who have undiagnosed HIV, are not on treatment, and have an ongoing partnership

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    Dec 15, 2014 9:49 PM GMT
    A better understanding of who is passing HIV on could help with the design and targeting of HIV prevention and testing interventions. It could also help explain why – despite the high uptake of HIV treatment – there are no signs of a fall in new HIV infections among gay men in the UK.

    The researchers fed into their model data on HIV diagnoses, uptake of HIV treatment, CD4 counts, the sexual behaviour of UK gay men (condom use, rate of partner change, serosorting, etc.), as well as the risk of HIV transmission during various sexual behaviours and at various viral loads.


    http://www.aidsmap.com/HIV-most-often-passed-on-by-younger-gay-men-who-have-undiagnosed-HIV-are-not-on-treatment-and-have-an-ongoing-partnership/page/2928944/
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    Dec 21, 2014 5:19 AM GMT

    Men with undiagnosed HIV

    Men who are living with HIV without being aware of it cannot take HIV treatment and cannot make informed decisions about their sexual behaviour, so are more likely to pass HIV on. Around one in five gay men living with HIV in the UK – a little under 8000 men – are undiagnosed.

    The modelling found that undiagnosed men made a disproportionate contribution to onward transmission, with around 63% (credible range: 49 to 80%) of transmissions coming from them. Moreover, most of the undiagnosed men passing on HIV have a CD4 count above 350 cells/mm3 and so are unlikely to notice problems with their health.

    Within the group of men living with HIV who are not taking HIV treatment, a majority are undiagnosed. In this analysis, around 85% of HIV transmissions come from men who are not taking HIV treatment (credible range: 78 to 92%).