Form versus weight

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 19, 2009 11:23 PM GMT
    hi everyone.
    some advice.
    Im pretty bad at some of the exercises I do at the gym, for example curls.
    Does anyone have advice - what is more important - getting the exercises done with good form, or pushing the weight up?
    Im just hesistant to go to a lower weight with some of my stuff because im alraedy at a low weight and im worried i wont improve.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 20, 2009 12:23 AM GMT
    form is more important, form and focus..

    if you have to go lighter to get right form then do it, once you have right form ingrained into your body, doing it with heavier weights is easier and you start to feel when you really need to stop.

    Cheating (ie, getting your hips into it, swinging, bouncing and so on) should really be avoided until your far more advanced, when your starting or if you been using bad form, you should stick to strict form and focus of lifting correctly and with the right muscles.

    When you curl the weight, focus on the movement, putting is much focus on the mucles you are using will make that weight seem far heavier.
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    Jan 20, 2009 12:30 AM GMT
    Quality > Quantity.

    For curls, a technique I use, is get a bench and instead of setting it at a 90 degree angle, set the back so it isn't straight up. This way you will be forced to NOT swing your body.
  • NYCguy74

    Posts: 311

    Jan 20, 2009 12:39 AM GMT
    at one of the gyms i went to there was a bar to help with stabilizing your arms during curls.
    took a while to find this picture, didn't know the name of it, called a "bicep bomber"
    can help you with form.
    Free Image Hosting at www.ImageShack.us
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    Jan 20, 2009 12:42 AM GMT
    It's called an "Arm Blaster."

    You'll find the best form on incline, independent movement, double-contracting, dumbbell curls, which both provide stretch and a full range of motion.

    Stay away from devices such as barbells and bars because they will limit your range of motion, bind your wrists, and limit proper rotation, and inhibit stretch, which can contribute to up to 30% of the muscle hypertrophy.
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    Jan 20, 2009 12:44 AM GMT
    NYCguy74 said>Free Image Hosting at www.ImageShack.us
    Can anyone tell me, why would you use one of these and not just drop down in weight and practice better form?
  • DuggerPDX

    Posts: 386

    Jan 20, 2009 12:47 AM GMT
    Look at the guy in the picture, does he look like he's worried about form?

    Have to agree with everyone, form is very important, weight will just naturally follow.
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    Jan 20, 2009 12:53 AM GMT
    I have 54.5 inch shoulders. I blow folks away when they see me doing perfectly executed side laterally raises with 10 pound weights.

    Or, when I have a 48 inch chest, and they see me doing flies with 25's like so:

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    Jan 20, 2009 12:54 AM GMT
    You can look like the guy who lifts 600 pounds, or be the guy who looks like lifts 600 pounds, but who is constantly hurt.
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    Jan 20, 2009 1:01 AM GMT
    I lift less than most guys at the gym and look like I can out-bench any of them icon_biggrin.gif
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    Jan 20, 2009 1:29 AM GMT
    Form is so much more important than how much weight you lift... which can be very intimidating since everyone else will be lifting more than you most likely. Just remember, you'll be gaining more muscle.

    Lifting too much weight causes you to use momentum instead of your muscles

    Also squeeze your muscles that you are working on, when you lift. Concentrate on those muscles alone... think about squeezing them and go slow.

    When my trainer worked with me one day she pointed out a guy that spends on average 3 hours a day at the gym. She said he wasn't getting any results at all because of his form and how much weight he lifted.

    Guys try to act macho and lift great amounts of weight. Though only a few people can do that and do it right... the rest of us should use smaller weights.
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    Jan 20, 2009 1:38 AM GMT
    Form is more important but also progression is the key to success either by increasing weights or the reps when possible..... I try to increase the reps the majority of the time and try to go to failure with good form icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 20, 2009 2:13 AM GMT
    We put 74 pounds of lean muscle on flex89 and dropped his fat level by 2% in just five months.

    The first thing I told Logan was "I don't care that the guy next to you is 1/4 squatting 385. You go do your squats and do 12 to 25, and beat it home, and eat." Logan now has 27.5 inch thighs.

    Now, Stephen, our skinny friend from UNT, says:



    Now that we've spent a year on developing Logan's underlying support structures, we're getting into more advanced concepts like negatives.

    Going slow is not a mandate, as long as you control the weight. There are a wide range of studies on various lifting cadences if you wish to delve into the science.

    Sacriplasmic hypertrophy is a not really related to super heavy weights as much as enlarged the fascia ("the pump" / endurance), and allowing the muscle to grow into it. E.g., Pump and Pose helps this along. Higher rep work outs encourage sacriplasmic hypertrophy / size.

    To answer the question to the topic originator, it's a no brainer: form is clearly more important, because it produces better results, and keeps you from getting injured. If you get injured you can be held up for months, years, or even a lifetime. The saying goes, don't train like a moron.

    Bodybuilding, power lifting, and casual fitness are three different things:
    Bodybuilding is about cosmetics (if you're competitive), powerlifting is about moving a weight through a place in space, and casual fitness is the ho hum approach of those who approach athleticism from the perspective of an adjunct rather than really a competitive endeavor.

    Bodybuilding involves a look of "lines", hypertrophy, presentation, and extreme muscularity. Powerlifting involves moving a weight at all costs, via method, equipment, and the ability to generate a short burst of power. The casual fitness is about "whatever."

    For all three, form and technique, and applied science come into play. Bottom line: you have to stay healthy, and you can't stay healthy is you exercise like an idiot.

    And, thinking on this a bit further, I forgot to mention sports-specific training.....which, of course, is geared towards sports performance in a particular sport.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 20, 2009 2:27 AM GMT
    form form form

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    Jan 20, 2009 2:50 AM GMT
    Tee bone beat me to it. ALWAYS form. Don't ever be embarassed to go to lower weights in the pursuit of better form. The pro bodybuilder at my gym is always reminding me to take it back so that my form is perfect. If your form is not good, you won't get stronger and you'll run the risk of hurting yourself.
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    Jan 20, 2009 4:44 AM GMT
    funny. this dipshit mfkr gets helped out of the gym the other day (doing squats and fked his back up). bad form. no kidding. this guy is notorious for lifting way too much weight and compromising form. any of us veterans or trainers cringe at the sight of this guy lifting.

    form form form
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 20, 2009 4:47 AM GMT
    See what happens when you lift badly?













  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 20, 2009 5:04 AM GMT
    I always crack up when guys say they are veteran weight lifters or whatnot and look like shit. No biceps to speak of and definitely no triceps. And they tell everyone how to work out.

    That device helps you limit arm movement. I never liked it because I never needed it, But it is not bad. I started with a strict Preacher curl, or Scott curl, set-up. Like anyone knows Larry Scott anymore anyway. But, pre steriods, Larry Scott had the best arms around. I learned from him. Strict Scott curls. Vince Gironda taught him, and he taught me.

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    Jan 20, 2009 7:08 AM GMT
    thanks everyone!
    in fact it is the preacher curl that i am particularly rubbish at! but tomorrow at the gym - Im going to go hard, but with perfect form!
    youre all champions!