Beautiful Snapshots of LGBT Sanctuaries in The Mid-20th Century

  • metta

    Posts: 39133

    Dec 29, 2014 8:30 AM GMT
    Beautiful Snapshots of LGBT Sanctuaries in The Mid-20th Century


    An unprecedented look into the sanctuaries where LGBT communities found solace in a time of strife and misunderstanding.


    http://www.buzzfeed.com/gabrielsanchez/lgbt-sanctuaries-of-the-mid-twentieth-century


    "In January 1953, a group of Mattachine Society members in Los Angeles came together to publish the first LGBT periodical, ONE Magazine.

    In 1953 and again in 1954, the local postmaster confiscated the magazine, claiming its positive portrayal of homosexuality violated federal obscenity laws. But in the 1958 decision ONE, Inc. v. Olesen, the United States Supreme Court overturned the ruling, delivering the first Supreme Court decision in favor of LGBT rights."
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    Dec 30, 2014 3:12 AM GMT
    Awesome, thanks for sharing this!
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Dec 31, 2014 3:15 AM GMT
    metta8 saidBeautiful Snapshots of LGBT Sanctuaries in The Mid-20th Century


    An unprecedented look into the sanctuaries where LGBT communities found solace in a time of strife and misunderstanding.


    http://www.buzzfeed.com/gabrielsanchez/lgbt-sanctuaries-of-the-mid-twentieth-century


    "In January 1953, a group of Mattachine Society members in Los Angeles came together to publish the first LGBT periodical, ONE Magazine.

    In 1953 and again in 1954, the local postmaster confiscated the magazine, claiming its positive portrayal of homosexuality violated federal obscenity laws. But in the 1958 decision ONE, Inc. v. Olesen, the United States Supreme Court overturned the ruling, delivering the first Supreme Court decision in favor of LGBT rights."


    In 1958 I subscribed to ONE magazine.
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    Dec 31, 2014 6:57 AM GMT
    I've seen collections like that before and I have to wonder whether the authors (collators?) of the piece have some inside information about the people in the pictures, or if they're just projecting wishful thinking.

    Most of them are indistinguishable from anybody else's family photos. (Some of them seem to look more like brothers than like lovers?) Certainly I've seen almost identical photos in my old family albums, including the ones of the drunk soldiers. (e.g. where my Dad's buddies are basically holding him up to be photographed.)
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    Jan 01, 2015 12:48 AM GMT
    Metta, I'm sure I voice the opinion of many on RJ by thanking you for all your contributions to the forums, both controversial as well as educational.

    HAPPY NEW YEAR to you.
  • tazzari

    Posts: 2937

    Jan 01, 2015 1:26 AM GMT
    Koastal saidMetta, I'm sure I voice the opinion of many on RJ by thanking you for all your contributions to the forums, both controversial as well as educational.

    HAPPY NEW YEAR to you.


    +1 enthusiastic follower!
  • metta

    Posts: 39133

    Jan 01, 2015 2:36 AM GMT
    ^
    Thank you Koastal and tazzari! icon_smile.gif I Hope that you guys have a fun new years eve and great 2015!
  • bobbobbob

    Posts: 2812

    Jan 01, 2015 5:40 AM GMT
    We in Pensacola are in the process of gathering together photos and news articles tracing the history of our annual gay event that's been going on since 1972. It's now known as Gay Memorial Day Pensacola and drew over 40,000 last year.

    It began with a three young guys deciding the few hundred who showed up at mile marker 113 on the beach the previous July 4th was so much fun they wanted to invite more people to come. They used all of our "little black books" of addresses and phone numbers for the invitations and through their connections and family names reserved the San Carlos Hotel for guests.

    san-carlos-_50s_8x10_sfw_lucis_27-jan-11

    Naturally all of us thought the whole idea was going to be a total disaster. At that time I worked downtown right behind city hall, one block from the biggest gay bar in town and 2 blocks from another one. Friday afternoon, June 30th on my way home from work I noticed a larger than normal number of gay people downtown but thought nothing of it. That night my lover and I went to out neighborhood gay bar, "Quiet Village" and had to park on the street for the first time ever. More people than we ever expected had responded to the invitations. By Saturday afternoon the crowds had grown so large the bars couldn't let them all in. Monday July 3rd headlines on the morning paper was about the hundreds of gays that had been arrested. And they were still pouring into town.

    My lover and I took in four couples who couldn't find rooms. Everyone we knew had done the same. In spite of the arrests we all made it to "OUR" beach for loads of fun. After that it became a yearly thing that took on a life all its own.

    In the 1980s city government, the police, merchants and chamber of commerce all changed their tune about gays coming to town when we switched the event to Memorial Day weekend and began stamping all the money moving through gay hands as GAY MONEY. Police love it because it's the only time they work crowds and have no one to arrest -- except the few straight people who want to show their asses.

    We've NEVER tried to organize it which makes it all that much more fun. It's a 4 to 6 mile long beach party of gays with a family reunion atmosphere. People bring flags from their states or countries to raise up for others to see.

    I've "inherited" photo albums from 4 men who have died plus all my own and then there are many others of us who talk about getting together to put everything together but we never seem to get around to it.

    I've got good friends coming from France and Iceland for M-Day 2015. The guys from Iceland have been coming for a decade.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memorial_Day_Pensacola_Beach_Pride

    IUWROZ.jpg
    zLnsvb.jpg
    R8VEFP.jpg
    K2C91g.jpg

    go to Facebook links
    https://www.facebook.com/PensacolaGayMemorialBeachWeekend?ref=br_tf


  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 01, 2015 5:46 AM GMT
    Thanks bobbobbob!
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    Jan 01, 2015 5:53 AM GMT
    tazzari said
    Koastal saidMetta, I'm sure I voice the opinion of many on RJ by thanking you for all your contributions to the forums, both controversial as well as educational.

    HAPPY NEW YEAR to you.

    +1 enthusiastic follower!

    Me, too! Cheers to metta8!
  • metta

    Posts: 39133

    Jan 01, 2015 9:07 AM GMT
    ^

    Thank you! Have a great 2015!
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Jan 01, 2015 8:21 PM GMT
    bobbobbob saidWe in Pensacola are in the process of gathering together photos and news articles tracing the history of our annual gay event that's been going on since 1972. It's now known as Gay Memorial Day Pensacola and drew over 40,000 last year.

    It began with a three young guys deciding the few hundred who showed up at mile marker 113 on the beach the previous July 4th was so much fun they wanted to invite more people to come. They used all of our "little black books" of addresses and phone numbers for the invitations and through their connections and family names reserved the San Carlos Hotel for guests.

    san-carlos-_50s_8x10_sfw_lucis_27-jan-11

    Naturally all of us thought the whole idea was going to be a total disaster. At that time I worked downtown right behind city hall, one block from the biggest gay bar in town and 2 blocks from another one. Friday afternoon, June 30th on my way home from work I noticed a larger than normal number of gay people downtown but thought nothing of it. That night my lover and I went to out neighborhood gay bar, "Quiet Village" and had to park on the street for the first time ever. More people than we ever expected had responded to the invitations. By Saturday afternoon the crowds had grown so large the bars couldn't let them all in. Monday July 3rd headlines on the morning paper was about the hundreds of gays that had been arrested. And they were still pouring into town.

    My lover and I took in four couples who couldn't find rooms. Everyone we knew had done the same. In spite of the arrests we all made it to "OUR" beach for loads of fun. After that it became a yearly thing that took on a life all its own.

    In the 1980s city government, the police, merchants and chamber of commerce all changed their tune about gays coming to town when we switched the event to Memorial Day weekend and began stamping all the money moving through gay hands as GAY MONEY. Police love it because it's the only time they work crowds and have no one to arrest -- except the few straight people who want to show their asses.

    We've NEVER tried to organize it which makes it all that much more fun. It's a 4 to 6 mile long beach party of gays with a family reunion atmosphere. People bring flags from their states or countries to raise up for others to see.

    I've "inherited" photo albums from 4 men who have died plus all my own and then there are many others of us who talk about getting together to put everything together but we never seem to get around to it.

    I've got good friends coming from France and Iceland for M-Day 2015. The guys from Iceland have been coming for a decade.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memorial_Day_Pensacola_Beach_Pride

    IUWROZ.jpg
    zLnsvb.jpg
    R8VEFP.jpg
    K2C91g.jpg

    go to Facebook links
    https://www.facebook.com/PensacolaGayMemorialBeachWeekend?ref=br_tf




    Very interesting thanks for the post, commentary, and pictures.

    In the first picture, I see an Oldsmobile, about 1955, in the foreground, and a Studebaker in the background at the intersection. If the picture were larger, probably I could recognize more antique cars.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Jan 01, 2015 8:27 PM GMT
    Some of the "gay sanctuaries" were less safe than one might suppose.

    When I moved from Minneapolis to San Diego in 1978, I learned that until only a few years before that time gay bars were often raided in San Diego. The "moral" squad would enter a bar and if there were men dancing and no women on the dance floor, the men were arrested for indecency. The police were able to get away with it because few men were willing to fight the charges. Instead, they were anxious to make the problem go away as quickly and quietly as possible, so they just went to court, pled guilty, and paid their fines. That changed as gay persons became less closeted and more willing to fight. When the courts ruled that it was not indecent for men to dance together, the police no longer had a basis for making arrests.