The Surprising Link Between Gut Bacteria And Anxiety

  • metta

    Posts: 39107

    Jan 05, 2015 5:33 AM GMT
    The Surprising Link Between Gut Bacteria And Anxiety


    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/01/04/gut-bacteria-mental-healt_n_6391014.html
  • bobbobbob

    Posts: 2812

    Jan 05, 2015 7:49 AM GMT
    This is just odd news warmed over.

    Around 1994 they found out stomach ulcers were not linked to stress and anxiety but to the same bacteria.

    It changed my life for the better.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 06, 2015 8:46 AM GMT
    So what's a source for acacia gum, to provide the greatest amount of these supposedly beneficial prebiotics? Chewing gum? Raw chicory root comes in second after acacia gum, so what's got that in it?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 06, 2015 8:23 PM GMT
    The OP story is a distorted nooz story about something entirely different that I was going to post about a few months ago. I couldn't figure out a way to simplify it for this forum though.

    BTW: The "prebiotic" craze is a mixture of the work of ONE guy (who is somewhat more evangelical than scientific) and a bunch of bro-science. (A guy who couldn't even be bothered to do a quick search to see if the term was already in use for something entirely different.) There are huge logical gaps in the story. But, you know, it creates a nice market of relatively harmless stuff for you to waste money on.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 06, 2015 8:43 PM GMT
    To try to sum it up:

    There is starting to be good evidence of direct and indirect links between microorganisms in the body and the nervous system.

    We know there is such a link in some other animals - mostly insects.

    The state of the art is not at any level such that you, the consumer, can usefully manipulate your biota to produce any specific effect.

    Just eat a balanced diet with plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables and maybe a bit of yogurt once in a while. Don't waste money on magic pills and miracle foods.

    For those who are interested, here is a nice little speculative review on some possible mechanisms of microbe/nervous system interactions. I think you can download the full text for free at the PDF link.

    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/bies.201400071/abstract
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 07, 2015 5:13 AM GMT
    Well, clearly I am not going to be able to explain this to MMTM, but as noted above, it's a relatively harmless obsession and might get you to try interesting new foods.

    Lets try to break this down another way.

    When Roberfroid published his theory of "prebiotics," he defined it as

    "A prebiotic is a selectively fermented ingredient that allows specific changes, both in the composition and/or activity in the gastrointestinal microflora that confers benefits upon host well-being and health."

    This is an abstract, hypothetical (and unoriginal) idea. Not an actual substance. (BTW, The term "prebiotic" had already been used for more than a hundred years to describe organic chemistry that occurs in the absence of living organisms. I don't know why he couldn't choose a different word.)

    To a dietitian, this is pretty much the definition of "dietary fiber." Naturally, any dietitian will recommend that you consume plenty of dietary fiber. (Unless you have certain bowel disorders.) It's exactly the same thing.

    To the supplement industry, it means oligosaccharides. Either fructan or galactan. Why? Because they are already produced in industrial quantities. Not because there is any evidence that they are particularly beneficial. It's easy to package them in pill or powder form and sell them as "prebiotic." (Alternatively, exactly the same stuff is sold as sweeteners and thickeners.)

    But you don't need to seek out sources with industrial concentrations of fructan or galactan (e.g. the lists that you find in Wikipedia.) All fruits and vegetables have plenty of diverse oligosaccharides. About the only ones that really would not fit the above definitions are starches. There isn't much evidence that one is better than another. But most of them have really not been studied in this context. (Or even analyzed carefully - it's not easy to do. Much easier to just call them all "soluble fiber.")

    BTW, the paper referred to in the OP found no detectable effect from fructan pills (what you might get from chicory) and did claim an effect from galactan pills (what you might get from acacia sap, but is mostly produced from milk). But if you look up research on the galactan pills, what surfaces is that the European Food Safety Authority has twice rejected any health claims made for this stuff. The paper did not demonstrate any effect on microorganisms.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 17, 2015 3:44 AM GMT
    cafe-du-monde-5.jpg
    Here in New Orleans we add chicory to our coffee quite frequently. Back in the depression, they started adding chicory to coffee because the poor people couldn't afford the high price of pure coffee. The root of the plant is roasted and ground. It's then added to the coffee to soften the bitter edge of the dark roasted coffee. It adds an almost chocolate flavor to the Cafe Au Lait served at Cafe Du Monde. It is by far the best coffee I've ever had. Maybe that's why people here don't get so stressed out about life. icon_smile.gif
  • Svnw688

    Posts: 3350

    Feb 11, 2015 8:04 PM GMT
    More snake oil.
  • Svnw688

    Posts: 3350

    Feb 14, 2015 11:34 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    Svnw688 saidMore snake oil.


    Didn't you say you were in law school to become a lawyer?


    A registered dietitian with a master's degree in nutrition would 100% disagree with your snake oil comment.


    I NEVER said student because I didn't post on RJ in law school (I hadn't discovered the site). I'm a fully admitted lawyer in three states and several federal districts. I profess no knowledge on nutrition, but I know how to smell fraud and a sloppily hodge-podged formed "group" to add scientific gravitas to its SNAKE OIL.

    The ISAPP is a loose association of washed up, second-rate "scientists" and doctors who couldn't hack it mainstream and realized there are tons of fools ready to buy anything a doctor says is good, with supporting "studies." Of course, all statements have NOT been evaluated by the FDA and it is not intended to diagnose, treat or cure any ailment.

    There's a fool born every minute. http://www.isapp.net/Portals/0/docs/News/Reid-Putting_Science_First-2010.pdf

    Throw your money away if you like, it's YOUR money. But I for one know how to sniff out a scam--I AM trained in that. Pre and Probiotics probably won't hurt you, but to claim they "help" you is a fool's wish.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 26, 2015 7:55 AM GMT
    Svnw688 saidMore snake oil.


    Do you think Antibiotics are "snake oil" too?
  • Svnw688

    Posts: 3350

    Feb 27, 2015 6:44 PM GMT
    Radd said
    Svnw688 saidMore snake oil.


    Do you think Antibiotics are "snake oil" too?


    That's just silly. Of course not.

    Regarding PRObiotics. "Good evidence to support these claims is lacking." It's all snake oil. The most science can say is that it helps prevent diarrhea, and it causes an inflammatory response that activates the immune system. Have fun with your inflamed bowels.

    http://www.berkeleywellness.com/supplements/other-supplements/article/probiotics-pros-and-cons
  • Svnw688

    Posts: 3350

    Feb 27, 2015 6:51 PM GMT
    Here's a fairly well-regarded debunking website of bogus scientific claims.

    http://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/probiotics/