Hotel chains are asking the FCC for permission to block personal WiFi devices on their properties

  • metta

    Posts: 39168

    Jan 05, 2015 10:00 PM GMT
    Hotel chains are asking the FCC for permission to block personal WiFi devices on their properties


    http://www.dailykos.com/story/2015/01/05/1355685/-Hotel-chains-are-asking-the-FCC-for-permission-to-block-personal-WiFi-devices-on-their-properties
  • metta

    Posts: 39168

    Jan 05, 2015 10:02 PM GMT
    Google fights Marriott's plan to block Wi-Fi hotspots


    http://money.cnn.com/2014/12/25/technology/marriott-wifi/index.html
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Jan 06, 2015 9:38 PM GMT
    I'd say, let them block WiFi as long as they make it quite clear in their advertising material and when making a reservation that they have done do. And, if the blocking signal extends more than 0.05 inches from hotel property, stick them with a big fine. Moreover, if they do block WiFi, the AAA should remove one star from the rating.

    Unfortunately, the quality of WiFi service at many hotels and motels is so poor that it is useless. Also unfortunate is the failure of the AAA to take the quality of the WiFi into consideration when rating them.

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    Jan 06, 2015 9:47 PM GMT
    If i hotel actively blocks a hot spot service that i am privately paying for, with no purpose other than to get me to pay for THEIR service, they will get inundated with civil suits. I hope the FCC knocks this shit down.
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    Jan 07, 2015 1:30 AM GMT
    FRE0 saidI'd say, let them block WiFi as long as they make it quite clear in their advertising material and when making a reservation that they have done do. And, if the blocking signal extends more than 0.05 inches from hotel property, stick them with a big fine. Moreover, if they do block WiFi, the AAA should remove one star from the rating.

    Unfortunately, the quality of WiFi service at many hotels and motels is so poor that it is useless. Also unfortunate is the failure of the AAA to take the quality of the WiFi into consideration when rating them.



    Amen brotha. This is spot on.
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    Jan 07, 2015 2:23 AM GMT
    There is no way to do this. If my personal wifi is my cell phone, good luck blocking. ATT has tons of dough to sue this hotel chain, too bad for them
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    Jan 07, 2015 3:12 AM GMT
    JerseyAthletic saidThere is no way to do this. If my personal wifi is my cell phone, good luck blocking. ATT has tons of dough to sue this hotel chain, too bad for them

    I read Microsoft has joined Google in the lawsuit against Marriott. If Apple jumps in, too, it'll be a real Clash of the Titans.

    Putting the FCC between a rock and a hard place. Which corporate interests does it favor? I won't mention the interests of ordinary citizens, because that's been the lowest priority on the FCC's list, if virtually nonexistent, since the Reagan Administration.
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    Jan 07, 2015 5:05 AM GMT
    And they want to do this why?So you have to buy movies or something?
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    Jan 07, 2015 5:18 AM GMT
    WickedRyan saidAnd they want to do this why?So you have to buy movies or something?

    So that you can pay for Marriott's WiFi to the Internet while at their hotel. You see the charge appear on your room bill at check out, just like room service. They give you a unique pass code to unlock the WiFi. And you pay proportionally to the speed you choose.

    Hotels have been billing for WiFi access this way for a long time. What's new with Marriott is the attempt to block Internet access by guests who have their own wireless digital service.

    But in some ways that's like blocking your cellular phone service altogether, forcing you to pay a charge for using their wired room phones.
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    Jan 07, 2015 3:27 PM GMT
    blocking wifi would prevent cell phone to lap top pairing. dont think this is a good idea.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Jan 08, 2015 2:06 AM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    JerseyAthletic saidThere is no way to do this. If my personal wifi is my cell phone, good luck blocking. ATT has tons of dough to sue this hotel chain, too bad for them

    I read Microsoft has joined Google in the lawsuit against Marriott. If Apple jumps in, too, it'll be a real Clash of the Titans.

    Putting the FCC between a rock and a hard place. Which corporate interests does it favor? I won't mention the interests of ordinary citizens, because that's been the lowest priority on the FCC's list, if virtually nonexistent, since the Reagan Administration.


    It's not as though Marriott is the only hotel chain; there are several others. If Marriott does that, competition may cause them to stop.

    I wouldn't mind paying a small amount for WiFi if it were of good quality and password protected.
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    Jan 08, 2015 2:37 AM GMT
    FRE0 said
    Art_Deco said
    JerseyAthletic saidThere is no way to do this. If my personal wifi is my cell phone, good luck blocking. ATT has tons of dough to sue this hotel chain, too bad for them

    I read Microsoft has joined Google in the lawsuit against Marriott. If Apple jumps in, too, it'll be a real Clash of the Titans.

    Putting the FCC between a rock and a hard place. Which corporate interests does it favor? I won't mention the interests of ordinary citizens, because that's been the lowest priority on the FCC's list, if virtually nonexistent, since the Reagan Administration.

    It's not as though Marriott is the only hotel chain; there are several others. If Marriott does that, competition may cause them to stop.

    I wouldn't mind paying a small amount for WiFi if it were of good quality and password protected.

    You can still have free WiFi access that requires a passcode. In fact I prefer it, since it preserves bandwidth from poachers, who aren't entitled to have access by virtue of being a hotel guest or customer at some other kind of establishment.

    As for the competition argument, sometimes the competition sees an opportunity for copying their business rivals, for more profit. Look at the airline industry with their "extra charges" for everything in recent years. One started it, now most of them are doing it. If Marriott gets away with WiFi blockage, expect more hotels to start doing it for extra profit.

    At least in that class of lodging. And maybe the lower tier of lodging will indeed offer free WiFi to increase their appeal, but many of them are already doing that. It's Marriott's direct competition that will most likely copycat them.