American Football

  • j_enn

    Posts: 24

    Jan 12, 2015 7:17 AM GMT
    Anyone here that lives in the United States that does not like American football? I mean I love to play the sport sometimes but I don't really like watching the games, etc.

    I get called wimp or sometimes even gay over this issue.

    I prefer "sports" like boxing, MMA, basically everything that has physical combat fighting in it. It's bloodiness and gruesome action. Bone breaking, choking out, beating the hell out of each other's body, if that's wimpy, I don't even know what's considered manly or "girly" anymore.

    I do Judo as a sport, and hopefully going to extend it to BJJ.

    FYI: Not trying to insult masc or feminine.
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    Jan 12, 2015 3:26 PM GMT
    There are a lot of guys who don't like American Football in the US. I LOVE football but can attest that anyone who is calling you wimpy specifically for "not liking American football" is an asshat and maybe has issues. Absolutely ludicrous that anyone would suggest that. Tell them to fuck off.

    I'm guessing that since you're in Washington, everyone is going apeshit crazy over the Seahawks? I would love to trade places with you. You would very much enjoy Austin right now.
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    Jan 12, 2015 6:19 PM GMT
    I like watching college ball, but the pros only once the playoffs begin, like now. College is more exciting and full of human drama than the pros. Although the latter do execute very well, the players' vanity and grandstanding are REAL turnoffs. I always watch the Super Bowl, but usually more for the camaraderie of the accompanying party, and the commercials, which have suffered in terms of creativity in recent years; farting horses is NOT going to win you any Clios, BBDO, and you should have stuck with Leo Burnett, Bud. I AM psyched for tonite's OR-OSU game and am hoping the Ducks kick the Bucks' butts!
  • DanOmatic

    Posts: 1155

    Jan 12, 2015 7:48 PM GMT
    I personally don't see the point to American football. I think it simply serves as an excuse for tens of millions of people to work on their sedentary lifestyles and expanding girths. It's interesting to watch the endless coverage on ESPN on Mondays--the sheer intensity with which the analysts argue about every play makes me wonder what our society could achieve if the same energy were invested into finding cures for cancer or figuring out why poverty is so endemic.

    And don't get me started on men who walk around in the jerseys of their favorite player on game day. It makes them look like overgrown 12 year olds.
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    Jan 12, 2015 8:27 PM GMT
    DanOmatic saidI personally don't see the point to American football. I think it simply serves as an excuse for tens of millions of people to work on their sedentary lifestyles and expanding girths. It's interesting to watch the endless coverage on ESPN on Mondays--the sheer intensity with which the analysts argue about every play makes me wonder what our society could achieve if the same energy were invested into finding cures for cancer or figuring out why poverty is so endemic.

    And don't get me started on men who walk around in the jerseys of their favorite player on game day. It makes them look like overgrown 12 year olds.


    From a factual/behavioral perspective the poverty question is easily answered; from the political one, it probably never will be. The answer to the former is that people are neither created nor develop equally or beneficially in the sense of intelligence, drive, and moral character, and those differences are usually expressed in the economic sense of how much an individual can or will produce, whether for himself, others, or no one at all.

    And yes, the custom among adult pro fans of wearing jerseys IS a ridiculous one! One more reason to like the college game, where the fans are much more couth and the jerseys are usually worn only by the players' relatives or fellow students - and kids w/in 6 years of age 12.

    The intensity of debate is not limited to ESPN:

    http://www.wsj.com/articles/dez-bryant-when-a-catch-is-not-a-catch-1421018079
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    Jan 12, 2015 8:43 PM GMT
    DanOmatic saidI personally don't see the point to American football. I think it simply serves as an excuse for tens of millions of people to work on their sedentary lifestyles and expanding girths. It's interesting to watch the endless coverage on ESPN on Mondays--the sheer intensity with which the analysts argue about every play makes me wonder what our society could achieve if the same energy were invested into finding cures for cancer or figuring out why poverty is so endemic.

    And don't get me started on men who walk around in the jerseys of their favorite player on game day. It makes them look like overgrown 12 year olds.


    Well, we all have things we're passionate about right? I love football and I am definitely one of those "overgrown 12 year olds" who wears the jersey of my favorite player. I love the intensity of the analysis. Although I'm not very sedentary, I can definitely see how football and everything that goes with it could be a turn off though. I just effing LOVE IT.
  • Muscmasmat

    Posts: 124

    Jan 12, 2015 9:04 PM GMT
    I enjoy American football, from high school to college to the pros. For one thing, it harkens back to my childhood, where we played with just the neighborhood kids and watched the Dallas Cowboys with my family on TV; to high school, cheering on our high school team which were Texas state champions in football ("Saturday Night lights" was based on my high school team); and to college where cheering on my team was a favorite Saturday cultural event. And we played intermural football in college and even city league football as a young professional.

    Now I am in Seattle, so the Seahawks are a major happening that unites the city. And yes, we do indeed wear Seahawks jerseys on Friday to support the team as part of the 12th person (yes we pay Texas A&M to use their 12th Man copyrighted slogan). I see nothing wrong with this. Now days in America, we seem to have very few things that we can celebrate together. Rooting on our favorite local teams is one of them.

    But you know, I just also like to watch a really good football game to appreciate the strategy, physicality, camaraderie, and hard work that the players and teams put into their attempt to win a game. I know that Russell Wilson (quarterback of the Seahawks) spends hours weekly studying his opponents and planning for the next week's game, as do many of the top professional athletes. So, we can admire them for working hard to achieve their goals and dreams, part of what most of us view as a typically American characteristic.

    And lastly, I just enjoy the beauty of a well executed play. Whether it is a long forward pass with an almost impossible catch, or a run where the running back just refuses to go down despite being hit numerous times, or the quarterback bulleting in a pass just inches away from the outstretched hands of two defenders, it is just a beautiful and exciting sight to see. And I fondly remember, throwing those long forward passes, or running down the field to the end zone and catching the "hail Mary" pass and the exhilaration that came from them.

    You might think I am a football fanatic. I am not. But I do enjoy seeing a good game on TV, when I decide to make the time, or many times as I am working out at my gym.

    Of all the games we typically play in the USA, I enjoy football the most.

    For those that don't enjoy football, nothing wrong with that. Plenty of things other than football that are worthwhile to dedicate yourself to and occupy your time. But I think criticism of those that do is just short sighted. The entire football experience does possess many characteristics that are worthwhile and admirable.



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    Jan 12, 2015 10:46 PM GMT
    woodfordr said
    DanOmatic saidI personally don't see the point to American football. I think it simply serves as an excuse for tens of millions of people to work on their sedentary lifestyles and expanding girths. It's interesting to watch the endless coverage on ESPN on Mondays--the sheer intensity with which the analysts argue about every play makes me wonder what our society could achieve if the same energy were invested into finding cures for cancer or figuring out why poverty is so endemic.

    And don't get me started on men who walk around in the jerseys of their favorite player on game day. It makes them look like overgrown 12 year olds.


    Well, we all have things we're passionate about right? I love football and I am definitely one of those "overgrown 12 year olds" who wears the jersey of my favorite player. I love the intensity of the analysis. Although I'm not very sedentary, I can definitely see how football and everything that goes with it could be a turn off though. I just effing LOVE IT.


    I'm with you on the analysis, and it was great during this weekend's games. It's probably more technically expert than college commentary, but the latter's not too bad in its own right.
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    Jan 13, 2015 2:12 AM GMT
    If you want some great analysis of tonite's NCAA Championship, it's on the Deuce right now.

    Great play by that OR frosh q-back hustling and knocking the ball out the EX onto the 2-3!
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    Jan 13, 2015 4:57 AM GMT
    Watching television is not a sport.
  • j_enn

    Posts: 24

    Jan 13, 2015 5:51 AM GMT
    woodfordr saidThere are a lot of guys who don't like American Football in the US. I LOVE football but can attest that anyone who is calling you wimpy specifically for "not liking American football" is an asshat and maybe has issues. Absolutely ludicrous that anyone would suggest that. Tell them to fuck off.

    I'm guessing that since you're in Washington, everyone is going apeshit crazy over the Seahawks? I would love to trade places with you. You would very much enjoy Austin right now.

    Yeah I live in Washington.

    Don't get me started on the Seahawks bandwagon...................................................
  • mwolverine

    Posts: 3385

    Jan 13, 2015 6:05 AM GMT
    Yes, football is a beautiful sport. From the physicality in the trenches to the finesse of the skill players. From the complexity of the rules to the layers of strategy to the execution - teamwork! - of the players.

    Muscmasmat saidI just enjoy the beauty of a well executed play. Whether it is a long forward pass with an almost impossible catch, or a run where the running back just refuses to go down despite being hit numerous times, or the quarterback bulleting in a pass just inches away from the outstretched hands of two defenders, it is just a beautiful and exciting sight to see. And I fondly remember, throwing those long forward passes, or running down the field to the end zone and catching the "hail Mary" pass and the exhilaration that came from them.
  • mwolverine

    Posts: 3385

    Jan 13, 2015 6:10 AM GMT
    DanOmatic saidI personally don't see the point to American football. I think it simply serves as an excuse for tens of millions of people to work on their sedentary lifestyles and expanding girths.

    Couch potatoes will be such regardless of whether it is football on TV, soap operas, cartoons, "reality" shows, etc. - or video games.

    Hopefully, amongst kids at least, seeing it on TV will also motivate them to go outside and play.
  • waccamatt

    Posts: 1918

    Jan 13, 2015 6:32 AM GMT
    DanOmatic saidI personally don't see the point to American football. I think it simply serves as an excuse for tens of millions of people to work on their sedentary lifestyles and expanding girths. It's interesting to watch the endless coverage on ESPN on Mondays--the sheer intensity with which the analysts argue about every play makes me wonder what our society could achieve if the same energy were invested into finding cures for cancer or figuring out why poverty is so endemic.

    And don't get me started on men who walk around in the jerseys of their favorite player on game day. It makes them look like overgrown 12 year olds.


    You've obviously never been to a game with me; it's almost as good a workout as doing cardio at the gym - that is per my trainer who has been to games with me.
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    Jan 13, 2015 12:32 PM GMT
    http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2015/01/the-shameful-triumph-of-college-football/384234/

    icon_cool.gif
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14360

    Jan 13, 2015 5:29 PM GMT

    I used to enjoy American football, but the way things are going with NFL team owners expecting free welfare from the taxpayers to fund new stadiums but yet insist on not paying any taxes, I am getting turned off by the sport. Also the behavior of several of these NFL players off the field with their numerous run ins with the law is turning me off as well. Another factor is now the findings on how seriously dangerous American football is in terms of mental health as well as physical health that can no longer be ignored.

    I have started to develop an interest in the real football known as soccer and I enjoyed watching the World Cup games from Brazil last summer. Now that is a fast action sport.

    I really enjoy cycling, running, and swimming. I love watching triathlons. However I prefer to participate in the sport and keep active rather than sit in front of a television munching and gaining weight while the guys on the TV screen are keeping themselves in tip top physical shape.
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    Jan 13, 2015 8:25 PM GMT
    Is this a joke? Its proven most gay people don't like sports at all, I have confirmed that myself in this forum. The only times they talk about any sport is to post pictures of shirtless players.

    Also, fuck American football and go real football!
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    Jan 13, 2015 8:34 PM GMT
    mwolverine saidYes, football is a beautiful sport. From the physicality in the trenches to the finesse of the skill players. From the complexity of the rules to the layers of strategy to the execution - teamwork! - of the players.

    Muscmasmat saidI just enjoy the beauty of a well executed play. Whether it is a long forward pass with an almost impossible catch, or a run where the running back just refuses to go down despite being hit numerous times, or the quarterback bulleting in a pass just inches away from the outstretched hands of two defenders, it is just a beautiful and exciting sight to see. And I fondly remember, throwing those long forward passes, or running down the field to the end zone and catching the "hail Mary" pass and the exhilaration that came from them.


    Well said. We saw a few of those last night, as when OR's freshman q-back had the presence of mind and skill to catch up to the punt and then toss it onto the 2-3 yd. line. Some of the catches were pretty awesome, too, as they were in the weekend's playoffs. Attending college games - and I've sat in stadia from those at small colleges to the Big House - is the most exciting spectator sport there is. And yes, my favorite play in the game is the safety!
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    Jan 14, 2015 3:22 AM GMT
    Was not cursed with the gene that causes people to sit on the couch for hours screaming at the television. I don't understand it. Never will. Don't watch football, baseball, soccer, golf, tennis, NASCAR, etc.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14360

    Jan 17, 2015 4:08 PM GMT
    David3K saidIs this a joke? Its proven most gay people don't like sports at all, I have confirmed that myself in this forum. The only times they talk about any sport is to post pictures of shirtless players.

    Also, fuck American football and go real football!
    That is not necessarily true. There is a large percentage of gay men who participate in sports and watch sports. It is just that several gay men are not fanatical about ball sports. Don't perceive what the many of the so called jocks on here enjoy sports for because they are not fully representative of the Gay-Lesbian-Bisexual community at large. Not all gay men are into art, fashion, and politics.
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    Jan 18, 2015 11:25 PM GMT
    I sure love American Football after today's crazy GB Seattle game! And unfortunately for you being in Seattle, it's about to get more obnoxious. Sorry man.