Laptop is shutting on and off with no succesful boot

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 20, 2009 11:49 PM GMT
    Does anyone know what may be causing this? I've already checked to see if the video cable was loose and it wasn't. What else is there?
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    Jan 21, 2009 3:35 AM GMT
    over heating?
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    Jan 21, 2009 3:48 AM GMT
    Like Pinny said it could be overheating. My old laptop did this and the heatsink had become unattached. Sadly, I lost the laptop because it overheated and fried the cpu.
    If you have your OS disk (assuming it's windows) you can put it in the cd rom/dvd drive and try to boot from the disk. From there you can run a recovery. If it still shuts down before booting from the disk, it is most likely overheating. If you can boot to the recovery console, you may have a bad boot sector. Run chkdsk /f to try and fix the hard drive. Hope this helps.
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    Jan 21, 2009 3:57 AM GMT
    It is the motherboard that died. My HP laptop did the same thing. HP extended the warranty for another year when there was issues with the motherboards. My laptop was fixed free of charge within a two week time period, including free overnight FedEx shipping.

    If your laptop is within two years of age, contract the manufacturer to see if there may be a warranty repair.

    The hard drive was pulled from my laptop to get the data off of it before I sent it out for repair. HP replaced the motherboard and flashed the hard drive, so I was glad that I got my data and it was not lost.
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    Jan 21, 2009 3:58 AM GMT
    Buffyfan84 saidDoes anyone know what may be causing this? I've already checked to see if the video cable was loose and it wasn't. What else is there?


    My Apple stock is tanking, so I recommend you buy a new MacBook.
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    Jan 21, 2009 8:55 AM GMT
    Often this is just a fried battery.

    Pay attention to details. Do you hear a beep, beep, beep, or some such audible? If you do, that's the CMOS (Computer Manufacturer's Operating System)telling you what's wrong, or maybe the BIOS (Basic Input Output System), but usually the CMOS on a bootstrap failure.. If you don't, likely you'll see a message (watch closely) like "no valid operating systems), or "ntloader cannot find ..."

    Once you see the error, plug it into Google and see what you come up with, or take your computer to your 15 year old.

    You may have a corrupted "hive" (Windoze is toast.). You may have a bad boot sector (a virus or hardware issue), or you may have a virus that zapped your OS Loader (stupid, because then your machine is no use as a without being a zombie).

    Like so many times online, you really haven't given enough information for a qualified answer here. Watch and listen. The answer is there.
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    Jan 21, 2009 9:00 AM GMT
    Paradox should sell his Apple stock and tell you to buy a laptop from my company. icon_smile.gif


    Buffyfan, given that you say you checked the video cable, I'm assuming that you are getting no video at all. Not even a boot (BIOS) screen. If so, you won't be able to boot off a Windows CD, either.

    One thing to try to see if the hardware is locked up is to press the CAPS LOCK key and see if the corresponding LED turns on/off.

    As Scorpio_M said, just because the computer doesn't turn on doesn't mean you lost the data. You'll need to extract the hard drive itself and copy it before sending back the notebook (assuming the manufacturer will take it back).
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    Jan 21, 2009 9:01 AM GMT
    A video cable won't cause a restart, just FYI, and you said, very first thing, that you checked that already.

    You probably have a Windoze issue.

    You can read up on Last Known Good, or "safe boot", or pay an expert to help you.

    Your data is likely intact, but, you need to take it to a qualified computer professional if you don't understand it yourself.
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    Jan 21, 2009 9:03 AM GMT
    Chucky,

    CMOS = Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor

    Thus a computer will have a "CMOS battery".
    (Operating Systems don't need batteries per se.)
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    Jan 21, 2009 9:04 AM GMT
    Actually, CMOS means exactly what I said, as well.

    CMOS does the bootstrap to BIOS (the process starts with CMOS, built by the computer manufacturer). CMOS hands control to BIOS and sector 0 of drive 0 in IDE devices, but, CMOS is NOT without microcode to do the bootstrap itself. There are several jump instructions in the CMOS assembler (the CMOS) to strap the BIOS to start position. The CMOS is the very first part of the strap to the BIOS. It inserts the devices, (clocking and so on) and whatever overlays need to be set into place to get the devices in position for start so that the bios. BIOS has some jumps, too, as the assembler loads, and eventually goes about the OS loader, and finally, the OS start instructions. The CMOS is the microcode on the unstrapped devices that goes for the BIOS on power.

    I'm afraid you are in error.

    Just because you didn't find it in dictionary.com doesn't mean that I don't have my degree in computer science. Oops.

    It can mean either.

    The former is deprecated but commonplace.
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    Jan 21, 2009 9:15 AM GMT
    I'll call your bluff about a Comp Sci degree and raise to a Comp Engineering degree.
    Even a theoretical comp sci guy should know that this level of code doesn't constitute an "operating system".

    CMOS holds the BIOS settings.

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    Jan 21, 2009 9:18 AM GMT
    We'll agree to disagree.

    I've watched way to many of Intel's microcode videos. I know differently.

    I encourage you to study the microcode on any modern devices. Degree, or not.

    I lived with the lead microcode tester for Fab 12 of Intel in Chandler. I know better.

    CMOS does way more than just store settings. There are gates to latches, things to clock, and so on. It's microcode, and it's the first part of the machine to come up, even before the BIOS, and it all has logic.

    If you don't understand that, you don't deserve your degree.

    You differ on what you consider "operating." Clearly, if it has logic and it's guiding the latches, it's operating in some fashion to get to the strap on the BIOS.
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    Jan 21, 2009 9:32 AM GMT
    Whatever. Your technobabble is meaningless and unimpressive.

    http://www.google.com/search?q=CMOS+%22Complementary+Metal+Oxide+Semiconductor%22&rls=com.microsoft:en-us&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&startIndex=&startPage=1

    292,000 hits


    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&rls=com.microsoft%3Aen-us&q=CMOS+%22Computer+Manufacturers+Operating+System%22

    1 hit

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    Jan 21, 2009 9:33 AM GMT
    If it's windows, there's a very good chance it's a virus. Been there done that kinda thing. Try and boot into safe mode by pressing the F8 key repeatedly while the laptop is booting. Then use the arrow keys to select Safe Mode.

    Use you antivirus/antispyware program (remember only ONE scan at a time) and see if you're infected. Also I recommend getting the software HijackThis.

    http://www.trendsecure.com/portal/en-US/tools/security_tools/hijackthis

    Don't be scared by the sound of the name, it's a diagnostic and removal tool. It can detect recent changes made by malware very easily and provides you with a log file which you can then show to professionals.

    There are a lot of free troubleshooting sites available online which can analyze your HijackThis log and give you instruction on which stuff to remove. These are licensed Microsoft professionals. Sites like http://www.bleepingcomputer.com or http://www.majorgeeks.com/, there are more but I forgot their addresses.

    You can also analyze it yourself and remove stuff you don't recognize ever installing (like I've done a few times). You can crosscheck the CLSID (the numbers in curly brackets) in their CLSID Database to see if it is safe or malware. It's not recommended as but if you're knowledgeable enough about computers you can do this stuff on your own rather than wait for what sometimes would take days in computer help forums.

    http://forums.majorgeeks.com/showthread.php?t=38752

    Hope that helps.

    EDIT:

    Do not try and open other programs other than antivirus/antispyware apps in safe mode and see if it still restarts.

    If it still restarts immediately, it could be hardware, as chucky said, listen to the beeps. They tell you something:

    http://en.kioskea.net/faq/sujet-344-how-to-recognize-beep-errors

    I'll post it here:

    • Very short beep

      This problem is linked to your motherboard
      Else it can mean that you are facing a problem with your system memory (BIOS AWARD)

    • Short beep

      No problem

    • Long beep followed by 3 sequential short beeps.

      This issue is linked to your Graphic card configurations

    • Short beep followed by three sequential long beeps

      You are facing a system memory problem

    • Beep- PAUSE- Beep- PAUSE- Two sequential beeps

      This error is linked to your CPU

    • Three beeps-PAUSE-Three beeps-PAUSE-Four beeps

      You have an issue with the video memory

    • Three beeps-PAUSE-Four beeps-PAUSE-Beep

      This is linked to an error with your Graphic Card

    • Four beeps-PAUSE-Three beeps-PAUSE-Beep

      You have a system memory problem

    • Five short beeps

      You are facing a problem with your CPU

    • Long constant beeps

      It’s a system memory problem

    • No beeps

      Short, No power, Bad CPU/MB, Loose Peripherals

    • Three Long Beeps

      Keyboard Error

    • Short constant and high-pitched beeps

      The temperature of your CPU is too high


    If it is indeed overheating like Pinny said, you will get the above - short, constant, high-pitched beeps.
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    Jan 21, 2009 9:51 AM GMT
    Sometimes, things as simple as a power bump can cause a confused CMOS / BIOS. Sometimes, if you pull the battery for a minute, or so, it'll fix stuff. I've seen it dozens of times.

    If the system says "no boot device", the drive is unpowered, unplugged, or is DOA (Dead On Arrival).

    If the systems says "no OS found" that means the system finds the drive but can't strap, for whatever reason.

    The diagnostics are in the details, be it the BIOS beep codes, BIOS messages, OS loader messages, or watching the screen.

    You have to watch the system carefully, just like a technician would, to take action yourself.

    A lot of folks drop laptops and the drives get trashed. If that happened...you lost your stuff. Of course, you have backups, so it's not an issue, but, you'll need to replace the drive.

    Whatever the case, you'll need someone to listen and look at what the machine that is the computer is telling you.

    If, per chance, it is the drive, and you do not have a backup, there are data recovery procedures, but they could be expensive.

    You need to look and listen first.

    What you describe, of the computer shutting itself off, sounds mostly like a battery issue.
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    Jan 21, 2009 10:14 AM GMT
    sometimes i wonder if people know what theyre talking about when they say microcode...anyway this thready is not about "i know more than you!" but helping the main poster out. I suggest him to try the advises given here by chuchy so far and if that doesnt work then let us know.

    charlitos
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    Jan 21, 2009 10:52 AM GMT
    I think your laptop is a skinny girly man and needs to stop whining and eat.
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    Jan 21, 2009 12:36 PM GMT
    Time to buy a new battery, me thinks. x
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    Jan 21, 2009 12:57 PM GMT
    ZiMsTeR saidTime to buy a new battery, me thinks. x


    Not unless it does that while plugged in.
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    Jan 21, 2009 4:25 PM GMT
    Thanks everyone for the replies. I think I've figured out it is a hard drive issue. What I should have made more clear is, when I power up it stays on for about 10 seconds MAX, shuts down, and the process repeats itself. There is no image on the screen or beeps at all during this time. All I can hear is the fan start up when the laptop starts up. I do notice, however, the hard drive light on the front left side of the laptop flickers, and then it goes away completely.

    I don't really want to send my laptop in anywhere, since my brother is pretty much a computer affectionado, and built my family's first computer. I just need to work up the courage to ask him first. I think he hates being bothered! icon_biggrin.gif

    Once again, thanks for the help.
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    Jan 21, 2009 4:59 PM GMT
    It's just sleepy and having a hard time waking up; pour water on it. icon_razz.gif
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    Jan 21, 2009 6:22 PM GMT
    Buffyfan84> There is no image on the screen or beeps at all during this time.

    The good news is that it's not a hard drive problem and your data are safe.

    The bad news is that this is likely a motherboard problem.


    Buffyfan84> when I power up it stays on for about 10 seconds MAX, shuts down, and the process repeats itself

    Does it reboot or then you try again and it powers off (fan stops) after 10 seconds?
    (If there is nothing on the screen and no beeps, how would you know it rebooted?)

    Try pressing F2 or DEL (to get into the BIOS screen).
    But I doubt it will.

    One other thing you can do, just in case it is in a bad hybernation mode, is to hold down the on button for 5 seconds. That will do a hard shut down. May be difficult given that it's barely on for that long. Alternatively you can unplug and pull out the battery. Wait a few minutes and then put the battery back in and try to start up.
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    Jan 21, 2009 6:25 PM GMT
    You picked a gay fitness site to ask a computer question??? ROFL
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    Jan 21, 2009 6:30 PM GMT
    No shit???? LMAO. He's not the brightest lamp on the block, huh?

    To FUNNY.
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    Jan 21, 2009 6:35 PM GMT
    If none of the above works...

    hammer.jpg

    Wish I could be more helpful icon_neutral.gif