After Big Weight Loss, I Have Some Excess Skin

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 21, 2009 2:09 AM GMT
    Hey Guys

    Over the past 9 months, I lost over 80 lbs. I look and feel great. I'm in the best shape of my life. Now, I'm setting a new goal to complete a mini-tri this year.

    But, I have some excess skin around my middle. It's not bad, but it bothers me. Besides surgery (not an option) does anyone have any suggestions for getting the skin tighter?

    Thanks
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 21, 2009 2:42 AM GMT
    Time.
  • Kiryu

    Posts: 16

    Jan 21, 2009 3:16 AM GMT
    exercices...
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 21, 2009 3:22 AM GMT
    Hmmm. Exercise may help... but I'm afraid, from what I know, you may be up a creek.

    It seems like you lost that weight at a slow pace. Drinking losts of water during your weight loss peroid may have helped.

    But you are 47. the collagen in your skin has probably given up and is not as elastic. Also it depends on your genetics. Creams and lotions do not work very well at all--accoroding to my mom's dermatologist.

    I would try to save up for a tummy tuck. I hear they can do wonders. ask your doctor though.

    Good luck and congratz with the weight loss! :O)
  • Tyinstl

    Posts: 353

    Jan 21, 2009 5:17 AM GMT
    Congratulations! You should be very proud of yourself.

    I can't answer your question, but i thought i'd say that
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 21, 2009 5:36 AM GMT
    Tyinstl saidCongratulations! You should be very proud of yourself.

    I can't answer your question, but i thought i'd say that


    Ditto! Also, I've heard of laser tummy tucks now. You could try that as it's cheaper and less invasive.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 21, 2009 6:07 AM GMT
    There's plenty of firming creams out there...
    Sephora has a million and one but the one that I know for a fact worked on my love handles (yes skinny people have problem areas too) is this:

    http://sephora.com/browse/product.jhtml?id=P70109&categoryId=B70

    Bliss is an amazing spa in NYC and all their products down to their self-tanner are absolutly amazing and effective. I would go with something like that for say 2 weeks and see if there's any results.

    And anything from the Philosophy line is golden too.

    Good luck and congratssss!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 21, 2009 8:43 AM GMT
    Chill, you'll be fine.

    Understand, your new found body will fix itself, more or less, given enough time, and no matter what, you're almost certainly better off for it.

    Don't sweat the small stuff.

    Enjoy the years you've added to your life by ditching all that ickiness.
  • metalxracr

    Posts: 761

    Jan 21, 2009 9:34 AM GMT
    Exercise and with time you'll be fine! Don't worry about it!

    But Congrats on the weight loss! That's awesome!
  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Jan 21, 2009 12:35 PM GMT
    Try taking some Omega 3-6-9 supplements. It's good for you and can help with your skin bouncing back, according to my trainer at least. It can also help to rub a skin firming or cocoa butter lotion into your skin after you shower.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 21, 2009 5:49 PM GMT
    Thanks for all the suggestions. Only time will tell what will happen. The fact that I'm 47 doesn't help, but hopefully, the skin will bounce back.

    I'll also try a few skin firming products, but don't have high hopes for those.

    And thank you for all the congrats.

    Chris
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 21, 2009 6:05 PM GMT
    chuckystud saidChill, you'll be fine.

    Understand, your new found body will fix itself, more or less, given enough time, and no matter what, you're almost certainly better off for it.

    Don't sweat the small stuff.

    Enjoy the years you've added to your life by ditching all that ickiness.


    Weight loss doesn't add years to your life. When your number's up your number's up.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 21, 2009 6:18 PM GMT
    NoNameGuy said
    Weight loss doesn't add years to your life. When your number's up your number's up.


    Maybe not, but it gives the years back that you've taken away from yourself by taxing your system with the extra weight.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 21, 2009 6:21 PM GMT
    Congrats!!!

    I lost 40 lbs very quickly back in 2001. I understand the loose skin. It will go away if you continue to maintain your weight, and keep up with exercise and workouts. You may expect some minor stretch marks to remain if you have them, but very small price to pay for much better health and well being!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 21, 2009 6:41 PM GMT
    matt45710 said
    NoNameGuy said
    Weight loss doesn't add years to your life. When your number's up your number's up.


    Maybe not, but it gives the years back that you've taken away from yourself by taxing your system with the extra weight.


    There's no going back. Weight loss changes nothing but your wardrobe.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 21, 2009 7:18 PM GMT
    NoNameGuy said
    matt45710 said
    NoNameGuy said
    Weight loss doesn't add years to your life. When your number's up your number's up.


    Maybe not, but it gives the years back that you've taken away from yourself by taxing your system with the extra weight.


    There's no going back. Weight loss changes nothing but your wardrobe.


    Oh my aren't you just a precious little bundle all things positive today icon_rolleyes.gif

    At the very least people who loose weight are less likley to be depressed and consequently end up shooting themselves in the face....
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 21, 2009 7:20 PM GMT
    There's two proven things that'll fix the loose skin: time, or extensive plastic surgery. Take your pick.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 21, 2009 7:24 PM GMT
    For the cheapest, most effective, skin tightening, go get some Prep H, or the generic. It's been a bodybuilding staple for years.

    Like I said, though, don't sweat it. Be happy you aren't carrying all that lard around still.

    Remember, losing that weight (visceral fat, in particular) DOES add years to the life, and enhances the quality of your life, in those years, and greatly lowers your chances of catastrophic disease. To say otherwise is ignorant. There's absolutely no doubt that losing visceral fat lowers morbidity, even if done later in life. That's sound science.

    It's incredible that you took the personal responsibility to bring yourself into better health. Now, that you've learned how good you can feel, you have so much in front of you.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 21, 2009 7:28 PM GMT
    NoNameGuy saidThere's no going back. Weight loss changes nothing but your wardrobe.


    Sounds like someone could use a round of type II diabetes to see how it all works icon_wink.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 21, 2009 7:29 PM GMT
    I see Chasersprize all over again here.

    t has been known for some time that the relation between mortality and body weight is such that people at extreme weights -- the very thin, and the very fat -- die earlier than people of in-between weights. This led many to believe that CR doesn't work in humans. Most famous among those making such claims within gerontology is perhaps Leonard Hayflick, who, in a thinly veiled attack on Roy Walford's attempts to encourage people to try CR, claimed simply that "we know from insurance data [showing that thin people die earlier than people of average weight] that CR can't work in humans." [1] Many governmental agencies started telling us that it's "ok to gain weight as you age."

    Soon, however, it was realized that there was no parallel between the overweight and the underweight. There are very few diseases that cause obesity. Yet overweight itself causes many diseases. The situations is the reverse with thinness: thinness per se causes very few health problems, yet many diseases cause thinness.

    Researchers thus started to realize that the advice given to thin people to gain weight might be wrong-headed. They started controlling for diseases that lead to weight-loss, and soon discovered that instead of the U-shaped curve of the relationship between body weight and mortality, the curve they got was more J-shaped. That is, when you remove the people who are thin because they smoke or have been diagnosed with cancer, being thin doesn't look so bad. (And, thus, the advice to people should be: don't smoke, avoid other cancers, etc.; not: eat more!) It still doesn't look as good as being trim but not really skinny. But none of these studies can control for all the possible illnesses that cause weight loss. We hope that researchers will make progress on this front, however.

    #########
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 21, 2009 7:33 PM GMT
    What is Morbid Obesity?
    A person is classified as morbidly obese when their Body Mass (BMI) is greater than 40, or they are more than 100 pounds over their ideal body weight. Additionally, individuals who have a BMI of 35 or greater with an existing co-morbidity (i.e. diabetes, hypertension, etc.) are also classified as morbidly obese.

    The term “morbid obesity” is not particularly friendly to hear, however this is most commonly used by clinicians to diagnose weight status in adults. Morbid obesity has many of the same causes and some similar risks as obesity, but you will find that they differ mostly with treatment strategies. There are an estimated 9 million Americans who are considered morbidly obese in our country.

    How Morbid Obesity is Measured

    Like, obesity, morbid obesity is most commonly calculated using BMI. BMI is a measurement used to indicate obesity and morbid obesity in adults. BMI is calculated by dividing a person's weight in kilograms by his or her height in meters squared. An adult with a BMI of 40 or greater is considered obese. Additionally, an individual is considered morbidly obese with a BMI of 35 or greater, with an existing co-morbidity.

    Once you find your measurement, you will want to find your weight classification that is accompanied on the BMI chart or calculator. Knowing your BMI is a good starting point in addressing your weight. If you find you are in an unhealthy range, you will want to talk with your doctor to address this issue.

    To calculate your BMI, please click here.

    There is not a separate BMI chart used for men and women. Both sexes use the same chart to measure obesity. In addition, the same classifications of obesity apply to both men and women.

    Risks Associated with Morbid Obesity

    Many obesity-related conditions accompany morbid obesity. Once an individual is considered morbidly obese, these conditions become serious health risks. These obesity-related conditions also negatively impact the quality of life for individuals and their family members affected by morbid obesity. The most common morbid obesity-related diseases include:

    *

    High Blood Pressure
    *

    High cholesterol
    *

    Diabetes
    *

    Heart disease
    *

    Stroke
    *

    Gallbladder disease
    *

    Osteoarthritis
    *

    Sleep apnea and respiratory problems
    *

    Some cancers (endometrial, breast, and colon)

    For a complete description on each of the above co-morbid conditions, please click here.

    Causes of Morbid Obesity

    Morbid obesity is a complex issue and has many causes. It is a serious disease that needs to be prevented and treated. Like obesity, the causes of morbid obesity are widespread, but target three main contributors: behavior, environment and genetics.

    Behavior
    In today’s fast-paced environment, it is easy to adopt unhealthy behaviors. Behavior, in the case of obesity, relates to food choices, amount of physical activity you get and the effort to maintain your health.

    Americans are consuming more calories on average than in past decades. The increase in calories has also decreased the nutrients consumed that are needed for a healthy diet. This behavioral problem also relates to the increase in portion sizes at home and when dining out.

    While Americans are consuming more calories, they are not expending them with enough physical activity. Physical activity is an important element in modifying and shaping behaviors. The influence of television, computers and other technologies discourage physical activity and add to the problem of obesity in our society.

    Environment
    Environment plays a key role in shaping an individual’s habits and lifestyle. There are many environmental influences that can impact your health decisions. Today’s society has developed a more sedentary lifestyle. Walking has been replaced by driving cars, physical activity has been replaced by technology and nutrition has been overcome by convenience foods.

    Genetics
    Science shows that genetics play a role in obesity. Genes can cause certain disorders which result in obesity. However, not all individuals who are predisposed to obesity become obese. Research is currently underway to determine which genes contribute most to obesity.

    What Can You do about Your Morbid Obesity

    When a person is classified as morbidly obese, deciding how to treat this condition requires a serious approach. Each treatment differs from person to person, as there is no one treatment for obesity. It is important to first talk with your physician about your weight, if you have not already engaged in that conversation. Your physician can best diagnose your weight issue and give you the options according to your health and lifestyle. It is important to work with your doctor in this journey.

    There are several methods available to address morbid obesity. You will find that treatment strategies for morbid obesity mirror that of treating general obesity. However, it is important to note that treating morbid obesity often takes a more aggressive approach, which includes bariatric surgery.

    Behavior Modification and Physical Activity
    Behavior plays a large role in obesity. Modifying those behaviors that may have contributed to developing obesity is one way to treat the disease. A few suggested behavior modifiers include:

    * Changing eating habits
    * Increasing physical activity
    * Becoming educated about the body and how to nourish it appropriately
    * Engaging in a support group or extracurricular activity
    * Setting realistic weight management goals

    It is important to make a solid commitment to changing a behavior or lifestyle. Involve your family and/or friends and ask them to help you make the necessary changes to positively impact your health.

    Increasing or initiating a physical activity program is an important aspect in managing obesity. Today’s society has developed a very sedentary lifestyle and routine physical activity can greatly impact your health.

    You should consult with your physician before initiating any exercise program. Set realistic goals and make sure they are measurable. Involving your family or friends can also help to maintain your physical activity level and reach your goals.

    Commercial Programs
    Participating in a non-clinical program or commercially operated program is another form of treatment for morbid obesity. Some programs may be commercially operated, such as a privately owned weight-loss chain. Counselors, books, Web sites or support groups are all ways you can be involved in a non-clinical weight-loss program.

    Physician-supervised Weight-loss
    Physician-supervised weight-loss programs provide treatment in a clinical setting with a licensed healthcare professional, such as a medical doctor, nurse, registered dietitian and/or psychologist. These programs typically offer services such as nutrition education, pharmacotherapy, physical activity and behavioral therapy.

    Bariatric Surgery
    Bariatric surgery is a treatment for morbid obesity and should be reserved as the last resort. There are various surgical options to choose from when considering bariatric surgery. In order to qualify for surgery, individuals must have a BMI of 40 or greater, or a BMI more than 35 and an existing weight-related co-morbidity, such as diabetes or hypertension.

    Deciding if surgery is right for you, as well as choosing which surgical option is best for you is a decision to be made by you and your doctor.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 21, 2009 7:35 PM GMT
    I'm not sure I'd use BMI as the indicator, but, facts be known, overweight folks die younger, and suffer way more catastrophic disease. Getting the weight off lowers your chance of disease, and extends your life, as well as improves that quality of life.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 21, 2009 7:39 PM GMT
    chuckystud saidFor the cheapest, most effective, skin tightening, go get some Prep H, or the generic. It's been a bodybuilding staple for years.



    WOW - what other secrets are you keeping from us. I enjoy reading chucky and flex's contributions (and a lot of others too!!). Thanks for taking the time to post everything you do.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 21, 2009 8:37 PM GMT
    Chucky, you are correct on all counts.

    I was classified as Morbidly Obese. My doctor said that to me and wrote it in my chart.

    The vast majority of us know what this means and how humiliating it can be to be labeled as morbidly obese. It could send you into a deep depression. Which, for most obese people feeds their obsession to eat more. It's a vicious circle. To some extent, I was there for a while.

    Now, my doctor rattled off a number of other things. I HAD high blood pressure. I had the beginnings of diabetes. I had sleep apnea. And ultimately, she said if I kept this pattern up, I could be DEAD in 20 years. Talk about a wake up call.

    So, I took control. With monitoring from the doctor, a personal trainer, and a dietitian, I set a goal. I have met the goal.

    What an awesome feeling to take control over your health.
  • Kiryu

    Posts: 16

    Jan 21, 2009 9:04 PM GMT
    I understand how you feel, i lost 80 pounds in 9 months
    i was happy at first but there was the problem of flaccid skin

    now i feel better, it's a good thing you take this under control
    do your best!