Let's talk Philosophy!


  • Jan 30, 2015 8:10 PM GMT
    Hey guys!

    I'm taking my translation theory class, and I am finding that I really am enjoying some of the more philosophical readings by Adorno, Benjamin, and Hadot. I took philosophy at my community college, but often found the crowd to dissuade me from really pursuing it as a degree. Even so, these guys (and to some extent, the people they are responding to) really catch my attention! My professor said it was something called "German Idealism," and I was just wondering what some of your favorite philosophers were, or any book that was positively influential in your life.

    Can't wait to hear from you!
  • Noeton

    Posts: 208

    Jan 31, 2015 3:19 PM GMT
    When I was getting my feet wet, I enjoyed reading graphic books in the Introducing series -- which can be really fun and give the basic lay of the land. For the specific period and thinkers your class deals with, I like several essays and books by Richard Wolin because they are both accessible and well-written.


    //www.introducingbooks.com/graphic-guides/

    http://www.amazon.com/The-Seduction-Unreason-Intellectual-Postmodernism/dp/0691125996

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/041595357X/ref=pd_lpo_sbs_dp_ss_2?pf_rd_p=1944687662&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=0691125996&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=06A2G9EZK9KGPJ9TWDG6


    If I had to name an all-time personal favorite, it would be Karl Jaspers. Here are links to two of his introductory books:

    http://www.amazon.com/Socrates-Buddha-Confucius-Jesus-Philosophers/dp/0156835800

    http://www.amazon.com/Way-Wisdom-Introduction-Philosophy-Edition/dp/0300097352/ref=pd_sim_b_1?ie=UTF8&refRID=0VX6M2T73NES2FWJACC9

    I also enjoyed reading Russell. You can't go wrong with his historical introduction to philosophy:

    http://www.amazon.com/History-Western-Philosophy-Bertrand-Russell/dp/0671201581

    A much slimmer and also very accessible introduction that I like:

    http://www.amazon.com/Students-Political-Philosophy-Guides-Disciplines/dp/1882926439

    One of my favorites by Russell -- very accessible and practical for everyday life -- definitely a positive influence on my life:

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/087140673X/ref=pd_lpo_sbs_dp_ss_2?pf_rd_p=1944687702&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=0671201581&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=08TM017VHSV93PED21KR

    If you are still interested in pursuing a degree -- I'd recommend you look not only at philosophy programs but also at intellectual history programs. A lot of professional philosophy in America seems to speak its own specialized language, but, in my view, intellectual history does a better job of connecting philosophy and the real world. Happy reading!
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    Jan 31, 2015 4:56 PM GMT
    It depends what you're looking for. If you want to read some of ancients, Plato's Dialogues or Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics might be a good place to start.

    What did you dislike about the philosophy crowd? In my experience, the academic climate varies quite a bit by department and individual courses. For instance, I've noticed continental philosophers tend to be more focused on correct reading of original texts, and disagreements and debate tends to be secondary. By contrast, in most of the analytic philosophy courses I've taken, people are a lot more eager to discover and point out any possible flaws in a person's argument. Anyway, I wouldn't be dissuaded by one or two courses.
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    Jan 31, 2015 7:12 PM GMT
    You like German idealism, OP? Precursor to Marxist thought. How unAmerican icon_smile.gif

    I'm unfamiliar with the philosophers you mention but I think Hegel and his contemporaries were full of shit. Thank God Russell and Wittgenstein came and blasted nineteenth century philosophical thought out of the water...
  • johnnyqhomo7

    Posts: 119

    Jan 31, 2015 8:35 PM GMT
    I like Nietzche. Thus spoke zarathustra and "the anti-christ" are his best works. Any hot guys want to talk philosophy? icon_smile.gif
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    Feb 01, 2015 9:04 PM GMT
    WriteinDeepSpeak saidHey guys!

    I'm taking my translation theory class, and I am finding that I really am enjoying some of the more philosophical readings by Adorno, Benjamin, and Hadot. I took philosophy at my community college, but often found the crowd to dissuade me from really pursuing it as a degree. Even so, these guys (and to some extent, the people they are responding to) really catch my attention! My professor said it was something called "German Idealism," and I was just wondering what some of your favorite philosophers were, or any book that was positively influential in your life.

    Can't wait to hear from you!



    I was into for it awhile when I was in school. Then I realized the "philosophers" really didn't have a handle on it. So it seemed like a waste of time to study someone's else thoughts rather than my own. I

  • Feb 01, 2015 9:27 PM GMT
    [quote][cite]
    What did you dislike about the philosophy crowd? [/quote]

    My classmates often made fun of me. They were less interesting in the pursuit of thought and the possibility of wisdom than finding their own sort of messiah and shunning all others, like Nietzsche or Kant.

    My university has a program called "History of Consciousness" which sounds a lot like the intellectual history courses that were mentioned earlier in the forum. I suppose I'm interested in philosophy or philosophical thought that has been mostly ignored by the western world. I find Nietzsche, for example, eye-rolling and a discredit to the world of philosophy in his popularity. Partly because people ignore the logical outcome of his/her ideas (let's not forget that his sister doctored or "fixed" a lot of his thought as an aryan sympathizer, so now much of the philosopher is suspect,) as well as the troubling basis for these ideas in the first place (an embracing of philology endeavor to push against the realization that many western languages were related to sanskrit, and the question of the rise of the masses.)

    Thanks so much to Noeton for the reading list!

    And to Alpha13, I think one of the most liberating things about philosophy is realizing that these individuals are still very much unaware of the bounds of reasons and their own conclusions, and that is okay in my mind.

    Has anyone done any reading on postcolonialism, epistemology, Zizek, or Edward Said? I find them incredibly illuminating about knowledge and culture!

    Happy discourse!