How do they make $?

  • beaujangle

    Posts: 1701

    Jan 21, 2009 12:47 PM GMT
    I realise that we can get so many things online these days free, virtually everything from CNN news to recipes.

    I wonder how do those in 'print jobs' make money? I've now stopped buying magazines & newspapers .....
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    Jan 21, 2009 12:59 PM GMT
    Ads, donations, subscription fees, endorsements.

    Be very careful of the free stuff, especially non-GPL software. Some bundle in spyware to get back the cost of development.
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    Jan 21, 2009 7:35 PM GMT
    CNN lives largely on the television ads they run, as do most networks. The online sites are done largely with advertising, but also offer products or services as their base. Then there's some like Wikipedia that are supported by donations alone, and far more that are done out-of-pocket by the owners.
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    Jan 21, 2009 7:43 PM GMT
    Makes one reconsider the phrase "you get what you pay for." icon_eek.gif
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    Jan 21, 2009 7:46 PM GMT
    The media in the United States has changed faces over the past few years. We've gone from three networks of "broadcasting" to 100s of networks with "narrowcasting" and now, we have on-demand.

    Large media companies, such as Belo, here in Dallas, have made the transitions to mostly digital (a transition started with USA Today), over the past decade in a fairly seamless way. Belo has gradually transitioned their revenue streams, and is always ahead of their competitors with innovative online services, and on the air services, and seems to have good sense in where to head their various properties while maintaining very good product quality.

    CNN is blazing the way with their innovative use of technology and their endorsement of a changing populous. Some of the stuff CNN is doing is fascinating.

    Record labels, on the other hand, have done nothing but kick and scream and threaten in a market they could have transitioned to had they been awake at all.

    Newspapers have dropped off, and that's just the way of the world. Technologies change, and many big newspapers are in deep trouble. E.g., The Chicago Tribune was just bailed out.

    Because The Internet is so vast, and so immediate, news is completely different now than 20 years ago. News literally shapes itself in real time now. I was fascinated to see streaming video from the head of a tank in Iraq via the military's battlefield awareness network.

    Most newspapers are in trouble if they haven't transitioned successfully. There are only x ad dollars, and there are so many more folks in the game now.

    Print media makes money most by advertising still, but, things are changing. Many papers won't exist a decade from now. It's a tough business model to sustain.
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    Jan 21, 2009 9:23 PM GMT
    beaujangle saidI realise that we can get so many things online these days free, virtually everything from CNN news to recipes. I wonder how do those in 'print jobs' make money? I've now stopped buying magazines & newspapers .....


    They are losing money and that's why major newspapers and radio stations are going bankrupt across the country. The $500B global advertising market cratered in Fall (roughly 40% of the volume was shed just like in the dot-com crash). Plus advertising had already been moving online (and decreasing to 1/10th of its offlline equivalent).

    Print organizations the world over are looking at moving online faster in the hopes that the 5-10% of revenue they might generate there may grow fast enough to stave off the losses they are seeing in the print business. It is only delaying death for a lot of them.
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    Jan 21, 2009 9:39 PM GMT
    The new york times recently started selling ad space on the cover for the first time ever

    There's a really good book by Richard Watson I was reading on the plane about 5 trends that will shape the next fifty years...

    Includes a lot based on what is thought will happen to printed media, basically saying as a growing number of reader based content become the main source of new and opinion coupled with a huge increase in ad space people will begin to reject a huge range of mostly poor, innacurate information and be willing to seek out and pay for quality in media....

    I can see it suffering a decline followed by a revival.think about it logically as time becomes a premium people will be inclined to turn back to trusted publications for what is basically the quality of professional contributors and the skill of a good editor to select what people will want to read

    I still remain loyal to certain media sources both online and in print.....Reuters, New York Times, London Times, Gaurdian, BBC