Helpful information regarding STIs

  • JKEWTY

    Posts: 9

    Feb 02, 2015 8:25 AM GMT
    Hey guys! So I know most of you would agree that the topic of Sexually Transmitted Infections is not an especially erotic or fun one, but it is VERY important to stay informed for your own health and for the health of our community. Therefore, I decided to spend my Sunday night laying down some basics regarding testing and transmission.

    I'm continually surprised by the amount of misinformation there is out there regarding STIs. This misinformation (along with the stigma it causes) is often scarier than the truth. The good news is that almost everything is easily curable (except Herpes, Hep C, HPV and HIV) as long as it is diagnosed and treated as soon as possible. But even the incurable ones these days can be managed (and Hep C may soon be considered curable).

    Let's start with some basic facts:

    1) Many (if not most) sexually active gay guys have or have had some form of an STI, whether they know it or not. Most STI's initially do not cause symptoms.
    There are 30+ types of STIs. Bacterial STIs include meningitis, chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis. Viral types include herpes, HIV, and HPV (warts). Parasitic types include trichomoniasis, scabies, and crabs. If you experience penile discharge or a burning sensation during urination or have any kind of sore or growth then you should definitely get tested. In fact, you should get tested every 3 to 6 months. Getting tested the day after a sexual encounter will not reveal whether you have an STI because it takes time for antibodies or sufficient amounts of pathogens to develop.

    2) ***If you are a bottom (or if you bottom), then getting tested for many STDs via a urine sample is not effective because the bacteria is in your rectum, not your urethra. Your doctor must swab your rectum (hope he's hot lol) to test for Chlamydia and Gonorrhea. Ask to have a blood test done for Syphilis regardless if you're a bottom or top.***

    3) The best way to avoid catching an STD besides not having sex (which at least for me is NOT an option) is to: (a) limit your partners and (b) use a condom and LOTS of water-based lube (oil breaks condoms). Ideally, it would be best to find partners who get tested regularly and who can show you their paperwork. If you are dating someone, I recommend you have a conversation regarding this subject and get tested together. Finding out you are both negative is one of the best/horniest feelings ever. Finding out one or both of you has something will bring you closer together (or, conversely, if someone breaks up with you because you have an STI than that is someone you don't want to be with...it's the equivalent of someone breaking up with you because you have cancer).

    4) Not all forms of sex have the same risks. Here is a list of behaviors in order or least to greatest risk of becoming infected with HIV via unprotected sex as well as the other pathogens you can get from them:

    A) Receiving Oral Sex: Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, and Herpes. Syphilis (low risk) and possibly HPV. Theoretically you could get HIV or possible HPV but most scientists would say the risk of HIV from oral sex is very small if not 0.

    B) Performing oral penile sex: the chance of getting gonorrhea from sucking a guy off is high. You can also get HPV and Chlamydia and rarely Herpes and Syphilis. Theoretically you can get Hep C or HIV if he ejaculates in your mouth and has a high viral load (if you had a wound in your mouth it might ribly HPV.

    C) Topping: Chlamydia, Crabs, Scabies (high), Gonorrhea, Herpes, HPV, Syphilis. The chance of getting HIV from topping is low (less than 1%) but it is still possible if the bottom has a high viral load. Theoretically you can get Hep C as well. If you are circumcised, your risk of contracting HIV from topping is much smaller.

    D) Bottoming: by far the most riskiest behavior in terms of HIV; same pathogens as topping but greater likelihood of transmission.

    E) Rim jobs: Amebiasis, Cryptosporidiosis, Giardiasis, Shigellosis. I personally use Saran Wrap when I'm doing this with someone I don't know just to protect myself from these little guys.

    5) Herpes: it's not as big of a deal as you imagine it to be, and ALOT of people have it. Some people have no symptoms while some have mild symptoms 2-20 days after exposure for 2 to 4 weeks. These include fluid-filled blister, headaches, backaches, itching or tingling sensations in the genital/anal area, pain during urination, swollen glands, or flu like symptoms. The risk of infection is highest when there are visible symptoms but can happen anytime. The first time you get it is the worst and it will hurt/scare you, but after that you may never have another episode and if you do it won't be as bad. You can take a drug to lower the risk of spreading it.

    6) HPV: Out of 40 kinds, 2 cause warts and 2 cause cancer. Most people can clear the infection within two years (so cool!) but some will not. Many will have no symptoms but some develop warts that can be invisible to the eye or take the form of small bumps or large cauliflower growths. The warts are harmless though.

    7) HIV: you can still have sex with guys who are HIV positive as long as they are taking their medication as recommend (ie Complera taken daily with a meal of 400+ calories etc) and are undetectable . I would recommend making them wear a condom or wearing a condom yourself for extra protection, but there are studies (PARTNER and HPTN 502) that show that the risk of transmission is possibly 0 from the positive partner to the negative partner. ***If you think you have been exposed to HIV (ie rape or some other scenario), go to the emergency room and ask for PEP (Post Exposure Prophylaxis). This must be done within 72 hours of exposure, and the soon the better. It is not 100% effective and the side effects are shitty but I personally know a friend who used it and it kept him from becoming positive***There is also a regime called PREP you can take to lower the risking of getting HIV; it only works for some strains of HIV and only works if you take it everyday but if you can afford it then it is an option.

    Hopes this helps! Basically, the Golden Rule here is Get Tested and Get Treated. Remember, knowledge is power...and sexy!

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    Feb 02, 2015 5:59 PM GMT
    Thank you for posting this... I'm still (utterly) shocked at how little people seem to know about this topic and how much BB sex is still going on out there. People regularly want to fuck me without protection of any sort.

    Won't happen. Period. I don't care what they tell me.
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    Feb 02, 2015 6:22 PM GMT
    That's a great collection of well presented facts. Did you mostly copy it from an "official" source or compile it from a variety of sources?
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    Feb 02, 2015 6:28 PM GMT
    Thanks, some useful information. Only one slight clarification I might make.

    "Oil breaks condoms" Oil breaks natural LATEX condoms, which are the most common, and the ones given out free everywhere. Synthetic condoms are impervious to oil-based lubricants, although some men find them not as sensitive as latex. And I don't believe any of them are as impervious to the smallest viruses as latex is. The CDC is somewhat vague about how much HIV protection they offer.

    Plus "oil" in US English usage is a rather general term, applied to almost any viscous liquid. Vegetable cooking oils will not dissolve a latex condom, but then they aren't the greatest sex lube, either.

    The latex problem occurs with petroleum-based oils & lubricants, to include Vaseline brand petroleum jelly. Therefore you really need to read the labels, to know the products you're using.
  • JKEWTY

    Posts: 9

    Feb 02, 2015 8:06 PM GMT
    Thanks for the clarification Art Deco! Even the well-informed can be misinformed!

    And thanks Nivek! I actually went off wikipedia (the Queen of Misinformation) just for a general outline but these are all facts that I have learned from my days studying infectious diseases at Berkeley and from personal experiences. I'm actually fascinated by STI transmission (especially HIV) and by zoonosis (diseases like ebola and hanta virus that you originally catch from animals). The percentages regarding risk change depending on who you talk to but I can tell you the risk for HIV is basically 0 for getting head (but just to be safe I and scientists say it does exist), a little higher but still basically 0 for giving head without exposure to ejaculate (just exposure to precut), and higher if he ejaculates in your mouth (not 0). An undetectable load brings this probability to 0 and a newly infected individual with a load in the 100,000's or millions brings it up more, as does bad oral hygiene or mouth wounds on your part. Same things with anal: a circumcised top has the lowest risk while and virgin bottom who is unprotected, not using lube, and is having rough sex with a big dick is at the most risk.

    I had a friend who lost his virginity to/bottomed for a guy and got tested the next day. Of course it was negative because it was a urine test and because it was too soon. I told him to go to the doctor in three weeks and ask for an anal and throat swab and to make sure to wear protection in the mean time. Three weeks later he came up positive for Gonorrhea and Chlamydia in his anus (and not his throat, which is why you have to test every spot...sometimes it just doesn't show up and sometimes it's only in one spot). Even though he made the guy wear a condom for full penetration, apparently the guy rubbed his head around my friend's hole which is obviously not practicing safe sex (which is fine if you are comfortable with that but if you think that skin on skin contact is "safe sex" then your taking a risk without knowing it).

    With regards to the note about HIV, I slept (flip-flopped) with a guy on and off for two years who was HIV positive and I never contracted the virus from him. I would say 99% of the time we used protection and that 1% only happened after I came to knew him well: knew he was militant about taking his prescription EVERYDAY at the same time, about getting his viral load and CD4 count tested every 3 months, and about getting tested every 2-3 months for other STDs.
    Here are some more figures: roughly 1 in 5 or 6 gay guys have HIV, and 1 in 5 of those positive guys DOES NOT KNOW THEY HAVE IT...it is these people who, for the most part, are spreading HIV because they are not on any drug regiment (there are guys who are aware that they are positive and do not take their drugs for a variety of reasons). These two groups of people SHOULD be feared, but undetectable healthy guys who get tested regularly and are conservative with who they sleep with should not be feared.

    I have gotten multiple STDs (surprisingly few compared to how much sexual partners I've had over 9 years in multiple countries; thankfully all curable and easily treated because they were discovered in a timely manner), and while it does suck to get any sort of infection (including the common cold), it sucks way more to not know what you have, to not cure what you have, and to spread it around to other people who could then reinfect you. Syphilis, for example, is easily treated with a shot if you catch it in the first year...but the longer it is in your body the more damage it does and it can actually kill you or cause you to go crazy. That is why it is important to tell past partners when possible when you find out you have an STI...they may react badly at first but I promise they will thank you for being honest and looking out for their health.

    STIs are just the price you pay for sleeping around and not being safe 100% of the time (and even when you are safe you can still catch them). However, I personally think great sex is worth the risk; I am fully aware of these risks and because I only sleep with 9s and 10s (kinda kidding...kinda) I am comfortable with so long as I have this conversation with them, get tested, and if I catch anything then get treated and notify past partners. I personally would take the Clap any day rather then die a virgin ;)
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4863

    Feb 02, 2015 11:02 PM GMT
    When I was 19, I was sucked for the first time and the guy gave me gonorrhea. Since it occurred the very first time, I question the assertion that oral sex is very low risk.
  • JKEWTY

    Posts: 9

    Feb 02, 2015 11:46 PM GMT
    Just because there is a low risk doesn't mean it can't be transmitted on the first or only act. The risk is low because oral gonorrhea only infects the pharynx, not the tongue or mouth. Most people with oral gonorrhea usually do not transmit the disease to others. If the bacteria in your partner's pharynx comes in direct contact with your urethra (ie your penis comes in contact with discharge), then you can get it. Or if instead of a penis you insert a finger or sex toy into the throat which then comes into contract with your eyes, genitals or anus you then can get it. People with oral gonorrhea usually have no symptoms and many clear the infection without medication.
  • Rhi_Bran

    Posts: 904

    Feb 02, 2015 11:50 PM GMT
    Thank you for this list. It is SO refreshing to see someone who listens to good science and common sense. Many kudos for pointing out the fact that yes, if you are a bottom, you won't get gonorrheal or chlamydial infections in your urethra - you will get them in your rectum. While these infections are typically more self-limiting than urethral infections (because the presence of natural gut flora makes it harder for other foreign bacteria to survive) and rarely cause sterility because they can't move up your urethra, they WILL make you more vulnerable to every other bacterial and viral STD so long as you have them. They can also trigger autoimmune disorders that are in remission.

    In addition, rectal gonorrhea, syphillis and chlamydia are notorious for inducing a condition known as "reactive arthritis". This is when your immune system essentially cross-reacts (confuses) between these pathogens and your normal gut flora and your inflammatory response goes, for lack of a better term, temporarily haywire. This can cause very painful, sometimes swollen joints (especially the knees, hips, lower back, and wrists), urethral or prostate pain / swelling, extreme fatigue, and bloodshot eyes (hence the rhyme, "can't see, can't pee, can't climb a tree). These symptoms typically occur several weeks after initial infection, last several weeks, and may be taken as a sign that you have a gut infection. For reasons not quite understood, young men seem to be more often affected by this than others.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 02, 2015 11:56 PM GMT
    JKEWTY saidThanks for the clarification Art Deco! Even the well-informed can be misinformed!

    Not "misinformed" but a matter of US English semantics. That's all I noted. icon_biggrin.gif
  • Rhi_Bran

    Posts: 904

    Feb 03, 2015 12:15 AM GMT
    I would assume that he's talking about resistant strains that can develop in infected individuals who lapse in their medications. Because PrEP drug (Truvada) is also used to treat active infections, it's plausible that PrEP would have no effect on a strain that has developed strong resistance to Truvada.
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    Feb 03, 2015 12:22 AM GMT
    www.cdc.gov
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    Feb 03, 2015 5:29 AM GMT
    Regarding Prep.

    1. Truvada is originally a post-exposure prophylaxis in conjunction with. And given its promising studies over the last decade, FDA finally approved it as a pre-exposure/prevention medication for HIV.

    2. Truvada in its early development, was only tested again the early predominant strain of HIV.

    3. New studies found behavior of HIV is as mutagenic as cancer, and sometimes individualized. Thus, "super hiv" infections are much harder to treat with standard drugs. Mutations of HIV occurs in various settings like Poz + Poz = Super HIV, and sometimes it can be variable of the individual's own viral mutation as the virus develops resistance to common existing drugs.

    4. Truvada. Recently evolving studies to even more promising as to lowering transmission rates of STIs.

    5. As advance as these developments are, HIV somehow outpaced our efforts as it is now viewed as more aggressive evolved strains that are resistant to most common drugs developed in the 80s and 90s.

    6. How aggressive are the newer strains? Unchecked and Unmedicated, 3-5 years max. Unfortunately, the range of those with such dim prognosis are between 18-24 of age. It's snatching our youth if we do not educate well enough.

    7. New Strains/Super HIV. Unfortunately, the treatments for these highly evolved ones are 20 years behind. We just made advancement to the strains of the 70s and 80s and it is significant. But a whole new generation (geo apps/mapping) particularly the grindr generation are being lost, hard and fast.
  • tj85016

    Posts: 4123

    Feb 03, 2015 8:41 AM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    Rhi_Bran saidI would assume that he's talking about resistant strains that can develop in infected individuals who lapse in their medications. Because PrEP drug (Truvada) is also used to treat active infections, it's plausible that PrEP would have no effect on a strain that has developed strong resistance to Truvada.


    Your assumption doesn't ring true. The only time resistance occurs to Truvada is when the person already had an "undiagnosed" acute HIV infection while starting prEP.

    http://www.aidsmap.com/No-significant-risk-of-resistance-if-HIV-infection-occurs-during-use-of-iTruvadai-PrEP/page/2849061/

    I would still like the OP to provide sources for his assertions as to why prEP only works on certain strains. If it only worked for certain strains we would have to know this and it really would not have the high success rate when taken as prescribed.



    please, there's tons of data showing HIV mutates qickly and becomes more drug-resistant every day - just Google it
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    Feb 03, 2015 4:24 PM GMT
    I thought this was about scoobies. I leave disappoint
  • Svnw688

    Posts: 3350

    Feb 03, 2015 8:44 PM GMT
    @JKewty

    This is an odd post because:

    (1). There are ZERO citations to medical sources. As a lawyer-in-training, you already know that words mean little to nothing without a source. Especially considering the serious nature of this subject. While I didn't see any glaring errors, I could take issue with a few "facts" you stated. The larger point is that if this style of post of copied by a lesser informed person, the results could be horrible (again, because there are no citations).

    (2). You editorialized in a factual writing. In law school terms, you pulled a blender of mixing the law and the application sections. If this is intended as a fact sheet, it should read factually. Alternatively, if this is your opinion, it should be labeled as such. As it stands, it's a hodge-podge of "A Fact Sheet of STIs According to Me."

    This seems dangerous, and doesn't feel right.

  • FRE0

    Posts: 4863

    Feb 03, 2015 11:08 PM GMT
    Art_Deco saidThanks, some useful information. Only one slight clarification I might make.

    "Oil breaks condoms" Oil breaks natural LATEX condoms, which are the most common, and the ones given out free everywhere. Synthetic condoms are impervious to oil-based lubricants, although some men find them not as sensitive as latex. And I don't believe any of them are as impervious to the smallest viruses as latex is. The CDC is somewhat vague about how much HIV protection they offer.

    Plus "oil" in US English usage is a rather general term, applied to almost any viscous liquid. Vegetable cooking oils will not dissolve a latex condom, but then they aren't the greatest sex lube, either.

    The latex problem occurs with petroleum-based oils & lubricants, to include Vaseline brand petroleum jelly. Therefore you really need to read the labels, to know the products you're using.


    That explains why, several decades ago when I was very naïve, I had a guy use a condom and we lubricated it with margarine. It did not break and showed no signs of deterioration. Presumably olive oil or cocoanut oil would also work.

    The CDC should provide more thorough information. It seems to be watered down to the eighth grade level.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4863

    Feb 03, 2015 11:18 PM GMT
    Svnw688 said@JKewty

    This is an odd post because:

    (1). There are ZERO citations to medical sources. As a lawyer-in-training, you already know that words mean little to nothing without a source. Especially considering the serious nature of this subject. While I didn't see any glaring errors, I could take issue with a few "facts" you stated. The larger point is that if this style of post of copied by a lesser informed person, the results could be horrible (again, because there are no citations).

    (2). You editorialized in a factual writing. In law school terms, you pulled a blender of mixing the law and the application sections. If this is intended as a fact sheet, it should read factually. Alternatively, if this is your opinion, it should be labeled as such. As it stands, it's a hodge-podge of "A Fact Sheet of STIs According to Me."

    This seems dangerous, and doesn't feel right.



    The same problem exists with the common believe that "double bagging" increases the risk of condom breaking. I have been unable to find even one actual study that indicates that it is true. It's all guess work and theoretical, yet it is repeated over and over.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4863

    Feb 03, 2015 11:22 PM GMT
    Strains of gonorrhea that are multi-antibiotic resistant have been found and will probably become more common. It may even become incurable. That is a risk which should not be overlooked.

    Also, getting tested can be a real problem. A few years ago, the state of New Mexico decided not to fund testing for guys unless they had had at least a certain minimum number of partners. Lack of adequate funds was the stated reason, but they would not test even if the client offered to pay for the test.
  • Svnw688

    Posts: 3350

    Feb 04, 2015 12:06 AM GMT
    FRE0 saidStrains of gonorrhea that are multi-antibiotic resistant have been found and will probably become more common. It may even become incurable. That is a risk which should not be overlooked.

    Also, getting tested can be a real problem. A few years ago, the state of New Mexico decided not to fund testing for guys unless they had had at least a certain minimum number of partners. Lack of adequate funds was the stated reason, but they would not test even if the client offered to pay for the test.


    Amen. There is only 1 injectable antibiotic available to treat some gonorrhea. As soon as resistance happens (not if, but when), people who trick often will be forever oozing puss out of their penis. It's disguisting. And the infection spreads to other parts of the body (heart, joints, brain). It's our generation's game-changer like HIV was for the late 70s/early 80s.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2259367/CDC-fears-public-health-nightmare-cases-incurable-antibiotic-resistant-gonorrhea-North-America.html

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    Feb 04, 2015 12:51 AM GMT
    FRE0 said
    Art_Deco saidThanks, some useful information. Only one slight clarification I might make.

    "Oil breaks condoms" Oil breaks natural LATEX condoms, which are the most common, and the ones given out free everywhere. Synthetic condoms are impervious to oil-based lubricants, although some men find them not as sensitive as latex. And I don't believe any of them are as impervious to the smallest viruses as latex is. The CDC is somewhat vague about how much HIV protection they offer.

    Plus "oil" in US English usage is a rather general term, applied to almost any viscous liquid. Vegetable cooking oils will not dissolve a latex condom, but then they aren't the greatest sex lube, either.

    The latex problem occurs with petroleum-based oils & lubricants, to include Vaseline brand petroleum jelly. Therefore you really need to read the labels, to know the products you're using.

    That explains why, several decades ago when I was very naïve, I had a guy use a condom and we lubricated it with margarine. It did not break and showed no signs of deterioration. Presumably olive oil or cocoanut oil would also work.

    The CDC should provide more thorough information. It seems to be watered down to the eighth grade level.

    What are best are so-called "water based" lubes, that contain glycerin, and no petroleum. Among the US name brands I use are "ID" and "Wet". Just always make sure whatever you use is compatible with latex condoms.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4863

    Feb 04, 2015 1:01 AM GMT
    Svnw688 said
    FRE0 saidStrains of gonorrhea that are multi-antibiotic resistant have been found and will probably become more common. It may even become incurable. That is a risk which should not be overlooked.

    Also, getting tested can be a real problem. A few years ago, the state of New Mexico decided not to fund testing for guys unless they had had at least a certain minimum number of partners. Lack of adequate funds was the stated reason, but they would not test even if the client offered to pay for the test.


    Amen. There is only 1 injectable antibiotic available to treat some gonorrhea. As soon as resistance happens (not if, but when), people who trick often will be forever oozing puss out of their penis. It's disguisting. And the infection spreads to other parts of the body (heart, joints, brain). It's our generation's game-changer like HIV was for the late 70s/early 80s.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2259367/CDC-fears-public-health-nightmare-cases-incurable-antibiotic-resistant-gonorrhea-North-America.html



    Thanks for the post and the link. Unfortunately, very few guys seem to be aware of this.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4863

    Feb 04, 2015 1:04 AM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    FRE0 said
    Art_Deco saidThanks, some useful information. Only one slight clarification I might make.

    "Oil breaks condoms" Oil breaks natural LATEX condoms, which are the most common, and the ones given out free everywhere. Synthetic condoms are impervious to oil-based lubricants, although some men find them not as sensitive as latex. And I don't believe any of them are as impervious to the smallest viruses as latex is. The CDC is somewhat vague about how much HIV protection they offer.

    Plus "oil" in US English usage is a rather general term, applied to almost any viscous liquid. Vegetable cooking oils will not dissolve a latex condom, but then they aren't the greatest sex lube, either.

    The latex problem occurs with petroleum-based oils & lubricants, to include Vaseline brand petroleum jelly. Therefore you really need to read the labels, to know the products you're using.

    That explains why, several decades ago when I was very naïve, I had a guy use a condom and we lubricated it with margarine. It did not break and showed no signs of deterioration. Presumably olive oil or cocoanut oil would also work.

    The CDC should provide more thorough information. It seems to be watered down to the eighth grade level.

    What are best are so-called "water based" lubes, that contain glycerin, and no petroleum. Among the US name brands I use are "ID" and "Wet". Just always make sure whatever you use is compatible with latex condoms.


    What is best is not always immediately available.

    Because I eschew anal sex anyway and have not had it for decades, I am more concerned with the risks of oral sex which many guys mistakenly see as safe. Using condoms for oral sex is almost unheard of and those pushing safe sex seem to think that gay men have nothing except anal sex.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4863

    Feb 04, 2015 1:09 AM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    Svnw688 said

    Amen. There is only 1 injectable antibiotic available to treat some gonorrhea. As soon as resistance happens (not if, but when), people who trick often will be forever oozing puss out of their penis. It's disguisting. And the infection spreads to other parts of the body (heart, joints, brain). It's our generation's game-changer like HIV was for the late 70s/early 80s.




    The puss does not "ooze forever" from an infected orifice. You have asserted this before and this information is incorrect. This is a stage of the gonorrheal infection that will appear to go away but without effective treatment it can spread to other parts of the body (as you mentioned).

    Soldiers during World War II got gonorrhea and chlamydia quite a bit and didn't get treatment. When they could whore it up on those nights where they didn't need to fight they would go to taverns to get laid. Some would get an STI but getting treatment right away wasn't always possible due to the transient lifestyle. The puss would go away on its own eventually and men thought they were cured. But they developed urethral strictures that eventually needed medical attention. This was especially the case as they got older. A medical practitioner at an STD clinic told me of this and she said one of the medical procedures was like inserting a roto-rooter down a man's urethra in order to dilate and surgically cut away at the stricture. She didn't elaborate much after that but my guess is that's very painful for the patient.


    I heard about that from a WWII veteran where I worked a number of years ago. He said that the procedure was exceedingly painful and that guys screamed during treatment, but then they went and became infected again. One would think that anesthesia would be used for such a procedure, but perhaps the medical practitioners thought that the infected guys needed punishment.
  • Svnw688

    Posts: 3350

    Feb 04, 2015 3:53 AM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    Svnw688 said

    Amen. There is only 1 injectable antibiotic available to treat some gonorrhea. As soon as resistance happens (not if, but when), people who trick often will be forever oozing puss out of their penis. It's disguisting. And the infection spreads to other parts of the body (heart, joints, brain). It's our generation's game-changer like HIV was for the late 70s/early 80s.




    The puss does not "ooze forever" from an infected orifice. You have asserted this before and this information is incorrect. This is a stage of the gonorrheal infection that will appear to go away but without effective treatment it can spread to other parts of the body (as you mentioned).

    Soldiers during World War II got gonorrhea and chlamydia quite a bit and didn't get treatment. When they could whore it up on those nights where they didn't need to fight they would go to taverns to get laid. Some would get an STI but getting treatment right away wasn't always possible due to the transient lifestyle. The puss would go away on its own eventually and men thought they were cured. But they developed urethral strictures that eventually needed medical attention. This was especially the case as they got older. A medical practitioner at an STD clinic told me of this and she said one of the medical procedures was like inserting a roto-rooter down a man's urethra in order to dilate and surgically cut away at the stricture. She didn't elaborate much after that but my guess is that's very painful for the patient.


    My doctor told me that the discharge comes out forever, the only reason it appears to stop is when it, literally, clogs your pipes and forms a solid-ish mass. This is why it's sometimes called the "clap," because in the olden days people would clap both sides of the penis to break the hardened discharged up to allow urine, and more puss/discharge, to pass. The discharge only "stops" if it can't get through because it's hardened, which would be severely constricting urine flow.

    Why would discharge stop in an active bacterial infection? Sure your body might naturally kill the infection, that's possible, which would stop the infection (and therefore the discharge). Your body might also mitigate the infection in ebbs and flows (e.g., flare ups when you're stressed and immune compromised), but then the discharge would come back during the "flow" of the ebb and flow. If the infection is active, there will be discharge. I see no evidence of a "dormant" discharge/puss period in my, admittedly, amateur searches online. Not a single sources mentions the stopping of the discharge, which seems to be something that would be trumpeted, if true, since it might erroneously lead people to think their infeciton was "cured" when, in fact, it wasn't.
  • tj85016

    Posts: 4123

    Feb 04, 2015 2:27 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    tj85016 said

    please, there's tons of data showing HIV mutates qickly and becomes more drug-resistant every day - just Google it


    Get off your high horse. There are no studies through a https://scholar.google.com/ search that asserts that Truvada is only effective at treating "certain strains" of HIV. That, in and of itself, would render the medication as a crapshoot. And if that were the case it wouldn't be recommended to help prevent HIV infection.


    Do you even know how many strains of HIV there are? It's one of the fastest mutating viruses known.