M.A. in Philosophy or Sociology?

  • Eli_jah

    Posts: 1391

    Feb 11, 2015 9:45 PM GMT
    And what should I expect once I start grad school?

    Which program do you think will be more fulfilling long term on a personal and professional level?

    I plan to write, teach, possibly do non-profit work and/or start my own non-profit.

    I'm looking at Brooklyn College, The Graduate Center, and The New School for Social Research.

    Plan to do the PhD in the long term.
  • Bunjamon

    Posts: 3161

    Feb 12, 2015 12:35 AM GMT
    Sociology would give you more skills that you'd need to run a non-profit: statistical analysis, research skills, report-writing, grant proposals, etc. Unless you want to teach, a Master's in Philosophy is not going to be all that useful. As for fulfilling, that's a question only you can answer.
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    Feb 12, 2015 5:06 AM GMT
    Do you want fries with that?
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    Feb 12, 2015 5:45 AM GMT
    mindgarden saidDo you want fries with that?


    True dat!
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    Feb 12, 2015 5:54 AM GMT
    mindgarden saidDo you want fries with that?

    Don't be mean. Philosophy majors work at Starbucks. They're above fast food!
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    Feb 12, 2015 6:51 AM GMT
    I had a co-worker, really nice guy, male model handsome, who had a PhD in Philosophy, from Stanford. Doesn't sound too bad so far, eh? But he got a student loan to pay for it, and whoever he borrowed from is hounding him and garnishing his wages. Sounds like he'll be paying it off for the rest of his life.

    I could see getting a student loan to be a doctor, lawyer, etc., but a PhD in Philosophy?

    Edit: I forgot, he hadn't finished and submitted his dissertation yet so didn't actually even have the PhD yet.
  • buddycat

    Posts: 1874

    Feb 12, 2015 8:15 AM GMT
    I agree with lumpy. The guy with the PHD in Philosophy shouldn't have went unless he was funded and wanted to be a professor when he got out. I am reading too much about getting grad degrees that you don't need and how they don't really benefit you much. Can't do much with psychology without a grad degree and PHD is better. What do you plan on doing with a master's in philosophy? I wouldn't consider getting a PHD unless I was fully funded as a TA and got it for free.
  • Eli_jah

    Posts: 1391

    Feb 12, 2015 1:30 PM GMT
    I'm a minority, first generation college student. Earning a degree means a hell of a lot more to me than just gaining entry into a high-paying, corporate job. When did higher education turn into vocational training?

    A Sociology degree is applicable to many, many fields, and if anything, I can rely on my B.A. for career prospects. Just want to hear from anyone who has been through grad school and might have some advice. Not here for your smug superiority, lol.
  • Eli_jah

    Posts: 1391

    Feb 12, 2015 1:32 PM GMT
    Bunjamon saidSociology would give you more skills that you'd need to run a non-profit: statistical analysis, research skills, report-writing, grant proposals, etc. Unless you want to teach, a Master's in Philosophy is not going to be all that useful. As for fulfilling, that's a question only you can answer.


    Yes, this is how I see it too.
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    Feb 12, 2015 5:08 PM GMT
    4 years degree is an investment of time and money, so choose wisely. Instead of Sociology, I would say similar course likes Physiology is better from career aspect. You can be a counselor in education field to help people. As for Philosophy, I don't remember any of my friends study or apply for course like that.
  • Eli_jah

    Posts: 1391

    Feb 12, 2015 5:13 PM GMT
    Cooper87 said4 years degree is an investment of time and money, so choose wisely. Instead of Sociology, I would say similar course likes Physiology is better from career aspect. You can be a counselor in education field to help people. As for Philosophy, I don't remember any of my friends study or apply for course like that.


    2 year degree. M.A.
  • Tig3r

    Posts: 139

    Feb 12, 2015 5:19 PM GMT
    Mulignan said
    Cooper87 said4 years degree is an investment of time and money, so choose wisely. Instead of Sociology, I would say similar course likes Physiology is better from career aspect. You can be a counselor in education field to help people. As for Philosophy, I don't remember any of my friends study or apply for course like that.


    2 year degree. M.A.


    Don't you have to first receive your Bachelor's Degree?
    For me I gained a(n):
    Associates Degree of General Studies (2 Years)
    Bachelor's Degree in Political Science with a minor in Sociology (4 Years)
    Going to apply for Graduate School to earn my Master's in Business Administration, MBA (2 Years)
  • Eli_jah

    Posts: 1391

    Feb 12, 2015 5:45 PM GMT
    I'm three credits away from a B.A. (Media Studies, Sociology minor) which I'll receive in May.
  • Tig3r

    Posts: 139

    Feb 12, 2015 5:48 PM GMT
    What is the reason that you want to get a MA in Sociology?
  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4434

    Feb 12, 2015 6:00 PM GMT
    "When did higher education turn into vocational training?" I totally agree with you on this but unfortunately, the answer is : About the time of Reagan. People became production units. That is also when the income gap started down the wrong path. But we live in today's world. I have a high disdain for most MBA's (the degree, not the people). I think it teaches you modeling and tax loopholes. BUT, it does also teach some accounting and management, two things you'll need if you want to be the head honcho of anything. I don't know what a graduate degree in sociology teaches but like said, philosophy is for teachers. I'd think long and hard about whether you want to work alone or manage people to an end. If you want a management job (non-profit or other), you might want to add in the MBA. Even a one year degree. Many, many people think it's a sign of serious if you want to run a group. PHD is for teachers.
  • Tig3r

    Posts: 139

    Feb 12, 2015 6:13 PM GMT
    Destinharbor said"When did higher education turn into vocational training?" I totally agree with you on this but unfortunately, the answer is : About the time of Reagan. People became production units. That is also when the income gap started down the wrong path. But we live in today's world. I have a high disdain for most MBA's (the degree, not the people). I think it teaches you modeling and tax loopholes. BUT, it does also teach some accounting and management, two things you'll need if you want to be the head honcho of anything. I don't know what a graduate degree in sociology teaches but like said, philosophy is for teachers. I'd think long and hard about whether you want to work alone or manage people to an end. If you want a management job (non-profit or other), you might want to add in the MBA. Even a one year degree. Many, many people think it's a sign of serious if you want to run a group. PHD is for teachers.

    Sociology has several different sub-groups, but mostly it helps prepare for working with people of many different backgrounds such as those who suffer from addictions, abuse, marital conflict. It is the Study of Society as a whole (where as Psychology is the study of the Individual).

    When looking at those who suffer from addictions, we do not blame the addiction on some cognitive problem, more on less of the societal factors for which allowed the addiction to begin. Such as the policy paper I wrote on the effects of increase of Alcohol Advertising, and the increase of Juvenile Binge Drinking.
  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4434

    Feb 12, 2015 6:29 PM GMT
    Tig3r said
    Destinharbor said"When did higher education turn into vocational training?" I totally agree with you on this but unfortunately, the answer is : About the time of Reagan. People became production units. That is also when the income gap started down the wrong path. But we live in today's world. I have a high disdain for most MBA's (the degree, not the people). I think it teaches you modeling and tax loopholes. BUT, it does also teach some accounting and management, two things you'll need if you want to be the head honcho of anything. I don't know what a graduate degree in sociology teaches but like said, philosophy is for teachers. I'd think long and hard about whether you want to work alone or manage people to an end. If you want a management job (non-profit or other), you might want to add in the MBA. Even a one year degree. Many, many people think it's a sign of serious if you want to run a group. PHD is for teachers.

    Sociology has several different sub-groups, but mostly it helps prepare for working with people of many different backgrounds such as those who suffer from addictions, abuse, marital conflict. It is the Study of Society as a whole (where as Psychology is the study of the Individual).

    When looking at those who suffer from addictions, we do not blame the addiction on some cognitive problem, more on less of the societal factors for which allowed the addiction to begin. Such as the policy paper I wrote on the effects of increase of Alcohol Advertising, and the increase of Juvenile Binge Drinking.

    Thanks. That makes sense. I'd still recommend you think about the management function and whether that part is of interest. I've been on the Board of probably 30 non-profits over the years and the ones that dealt with people in need generally had two groups of employees. One group handled the clients and had expertise in the issues of the client, and the other group managed the organization. You can certainly develop expertise in both, but I do suggest the MBA if you're serious about the management side. It's expected these days. Even if you're doing your own start-up. You'll need to project competence in management if someone is to trust you with the money aspect.
  • Tig3r

    Posts: 139

    Feb 12, 2015 6:34 PM GMT
    Destinharbor said
    Tig3r said
    Destinharbor said"When did higher education turn into vocational training?" I totally agree with you on this but unfortunately, the answer is : About the time of Reagan. People became production units. That is also when the income gap started down the wrong path. But we live in today's world. I have a high disdain for most MBA's (the degree, not the people). I think it teaches you modeling and tax loopholes. BUT, it does also teach some accounting and management, two things you'll need if you want to be the head honcho of anything. I don't know what a graduate degree in sociology teaches but like said, philosophy is for teachers. I'd think long and hard about whether you want to work alone or manage people to an end. If you want a management job (non-profit or other), you might want to add in the MBA. Even a one year degree. Many, many people think it's a sign of serious if you want to run a group. PHD is for teachers.

    Sociology has several different sub-groups, but mostly it helps prepare for working with people of many different backgrounds such as those who suffer from addictions, abuse, marital conflict. It is the Study of Society as a whole (where as Psychology is the study of the Individual).

    When looking at those who suffer from addictions, we do not blame the addiction on some cognitive problem, more on less of the societal factors for which allowed the addiction to begin. Such as the policy paper I wrote on the effects of increase of Alcohol Advertising, and the increase of Juvenile Binge Drinking.

    Thanks. That makes sense. I'd still recommend you think about the management function and whether that part is of interest. I've been on the Board of probably 30 non-profits over the years and the ones that dealt with people in need generally had two groups of employees. One group handled the clients and had expertise in the issues of the client, and the other group managed the organization. You can certainly develop expertise in both, but I do suggest the MBA if you're serious about the management side. It's expected these days. Even if you're doing your own start-up. You'll need to project competence in management if someone is to trust you with the money aspect.


    That is the exact reason why I am pursuing an MBA. Based off my current experience I find that I am more of a leader, but an MBA would allow me entry into those doors.
  • Eli_jah

    Posts: 1391

    Feb 12, 2015 7:00 PM GMT
    Tig3r saidWhat is the reason that you want to get a MA in Sociology?


    It fascinates me as a field of study, as a way to "explain" the structure of modern society. On a deeper level, I think it will help me strengthen my own ideas and become a more informed writer and stronger critical thinker.

    I'm also very interested in statistical analysis but I've never had any thorough education in it.

  • Eli_jah

    Posts: 1391

    Feb 12, 2015 7:04 PM GMT
    Destinharbor said
    Tig3r said
    Destinharbor said"When did higher education turn into vocational training?" I totally agree with you on this but unfortunately, the answer is : About the time of Reagan. People became production units. That is also when the income gap started down the wrong path. But we live in today's world. I have a high disdain for most MBA's (the degree, not the people). I think it teaches you modeling and tax loopholes. BUT, it does also teach some accounting and management, two things you'll need if you want to be the head honcho of anything. I don't know what a graduate degree in sociology teaches but like said, philosophy is for teachers. I'd think long and hard about whether you want to work alone or manage people to an end. If you want a management job (non-profit or other), you might want to add in the MBA. Even a one year degree. Many, many people think it's a sign of serious if you want to run a group. PHD is for teachers.

    Sociology has several different sub-groups, but mostly it helps prepare for working with people of many different backgrounds such as those who suffer from addictions, abuse, marital conflict. It is the Study of Society as a whole (where as Psychology is the study of the Individual).

    When looking at those who suffer from addictions, we do not blame the addiction on some cognitive problem, more on less of the societal factors for which allowed the addiction to begin. Such as the policy paper I wrote on the effects of increase of Alcohol Advertising, and the increase of Juvenile Binge Drinking.

    Thanks. That makes sense. I'd still recommend you think about the management function and whether that part is of interest. I've been on the Board of probably 30 non-profits over the years and the ones that dealt with people in need generally had two groups of employees. One group handled the clients and had expertise in the issues of the client, and the other group managed the organization. You can certainly develop expertise in both, but I do suggest the MBA if you're serious about the management side. It's expected these days. Even if you're doing your own start-up. You'll need to project competence in management if someone is to trust you with the money aspect.


    All very valid points.
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    Feb 12, 2015 7:31 PM GMT
    Destinharbor said"When did higher education turn into vocational training?" I totally agree with you on this but unfortunately, the answer is : About the time of Reagan. People became production units.

    You might be surprised. I worked in the central IT department at a major university, the "data center." We ran the central servers for the campus; payroll, admissions, etc. And there were a bunch of application developers. So a mix of system administrators and programmers. We had very few people with degrees in computer science, because they could get better pay working for corporations. But our pay was decent and I suspect that in the long run we were happier; it's nice knowing you're working in a place that's doing things that are good for society and not just selling something.

    My previous post was meant to be a cautionary tale about getting a student loan in a field where you're unlikely to be making big bucks.

  • Feb 13, 2015 7:32 AM GMT
    Philosophy

    https://visionsanddreams.wordpress.com/2015/02/10/the-grandeur-within/
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    Feb 13, 2015 3:50 PM GMT
    mindgarden saidDo you want fries with that?


    My thought exactly.
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    Feb 13, 2015 7:31 PM GMT
    I vote for Sociology as I believe it's more practical. I also believe where you attend school makes a difference. Here are several lists of some of the top schools that may help you:

    http://grad-schools.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-humanities-schools/sociology-rankings?int=990708

    http://college.usatoday.com/2014/12/27/top-ranked-colleges-for-a-major-in-sociology/

    http://www.socialpsychology.org/gsociol.htm

    http://education-portal.com/top_graduate_schools_for_sociology.html


    An interesting paper: [url]http://asanet.org/images/research/docs/pdf/Idealist%20vs%20Careerisst.pdf[/url]


  • Eli_jah

    Posts: 1391

    Feb 14, 2015 5:24 AM GMT
    blkbodybdr saidI vote for Sociology as I believe it's more practical. I also believe where you attend school makes a difference. Here are several lists of some of the top schools that may help you:

    http://grad-schools.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-humanities-schools/sociology-rankings?int=990708

    http://college.usatoday.com/2014/12/27/top-ranked-colleges-for-a-major-in-sociology/

    http://www.socialpsychology.org/gsociol.htm

    http://education-portal.com/top_graduate_schools_for_sociology.html


    An interesting paper: [url]http://asanet.org/images/research/docs/pdf/Idealist%20vs%20Careerisst.pdf[/url]




    Thanks blkbodybdr, all of this helps