Probiotics and the Brain

  • InsatiableBlo...

    Posts: 442

    Feb 20, 2015 1:52 AM GMT
    TedTalk:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FWT_BLVOASI

    You have two nervous systems. Your central nervous system (think, brain and spinal cord) and your enteric nervous system (in your gut). Microbes in your gut release neurotransmitters that can be sent to the brain via the vagus nerve.

    And this is important because...?

    Because your gut microbes can be implicated in things like learning, memory, anxiety, depression, multiple sclerosis, etc.

    Fascinating Ted Talk.

    Now, I'm going to stock up on yogurt.
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    Feb 20, 2015 2:23 AM GMT
    Yesterday I was at the health food store buying wheat bran and some grains. The woman in front of me had 2 normal sized pill bottles and her total was over $100. After she left I asked the checkout girl what she'd bought that was so expensive and she said probiotics and brain supplements. I didn't ask her what she meant by brain supplements. I'll stick with yogurt and save my money. Health food stores love to take your money for worthless supplements that (at best) don't do anything.
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    Feb 20, 2015 2:33 AM GMT
    Or DIY with a Harsch crock.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2vHPpnzza_U
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    Feb 20, 2015 3:52 AM GMT
    SouthPawPete saidOr DIY with a Harsch crock.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2vHPpnzza_U

    Sorry, I'll pass on sauerkraut. Although kimchi I can do.
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    Feb 20, 2015 3:57 AM GMT
    See also the Joy of Pickling, which has a bunch of recipes for fermenting vegetables, as well as pickling the other way using vinegar. I'm still working my way through a batch of vinegar and salt pickled eggs I made in December.

    51A29ijFlHL.jpg
  • InsatiableBlo...

    Posts: 442

    Feb 20, 2015 1:53 PM GMT
    I'm browsing Amazon now, I really want to learn about the different affects of different strains of gut microbes.
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    Feb 20, 2015 5:27 PM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal said
    SouthPawPete saidOr DIY with a Harsch crock.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2vHPpnzza_U

    Sorry, I'll pass on sauerkraut. Although kimchi I can do.


    Or tsukemono. They're all pickles by another name.

    I like fennel/ginger or red-cabbage/ginger/chilies.

    Pickled collards have their own distinct flavor.
  • mybud

    Posts: 11819

    Feb 21, 2015 2:44 AM GMT
    Interesting...Thanks for sharing.
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    Feb 21, 2015 3:02 AM GMT
    SouthPawPete saidOr DIY with a Harsch crock.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2vHPpnzza_U


    That video made my mouth water. LOVE sauerkraut! In fact, I'm going to go eat some right now. icon_biggrin.gif
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    Feb 21, 2015 3:18 AM GMT
    If you can get Old Orchard frozen juice concentrate those plastic cans it comes in are just the right size to fit into the wide mouth Ball Mason jars. Fill the plastic can with water and set it in the mouth of the jar and it will keep things properly submerged while they're fermenting. It'll have just a teensy bit of space around it for the air that's needed.
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    Feb 21, 2015 5:43 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said

    I am going to get one of these harsch crock pots.

    Do you have one that you recommend?

    I went to amazon.com and found this one. I may try it out.

    http://www.amazon.com/Nik-Schmitt-Fermenting-Crock-Liter/dp/B0007VKLB0/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1424488238&sr=8-1&keywords=harsch+crock+pot

    Does one have to maintain a certain temperature to ferment cabbage? I am having issues with making komucha and kefir without heating pads.


    I bought mine through Amazon years ago. The one pictured in your link looks good. The important feature is the water-lock around the lid. Also, I use a 5 liter and rarely fill it up. I think I enjoy a lot of pickles, but maybe not that much. Also smaller batches allow more turnover, variety and experimentation.

    I've read the ideal temp for pickling is 72°. But I've successfully pickled in a wider range from low 60's to high 70's. I read that in a UN or UNEP research paper on food preservation traditions. Unfortunately, I can't find that link now. But it detailed temps, methods and food choices, bacterial species, chemical processes, etc.
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    Feb 21, 2015 6:06 PM GMT
    SouthPawPete, Is this similar to the recipe you used for Fennel-Ginger Sauerkraut? Sounds wonderful.

    Fennel Ginger Sauerkraut

    Print
    Prep time
    20 mins
    Fermentation time
    2-6 weeks

    Author: Fermenters Club
    Recipe type: Fermented vegetable
    Yield: About 4 quarts/4 liters
    Ingredients
    5-6 lbs./2.5 kg red or green cabbage (about 2 medium heads)
    3 Tablespoons/45 mL sea salt
    2 medium to large fennel bulb
    6" to 8" (15 to 20cm) fresh ginger
    1 teaspoon/5 mL dried caraway seeds
    ½ teaspoon/3 mL dried juniper berries


    http://www.fermentersclub.com/fennel-ginger-sauerkraut/
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    Feb 21, 2015 8:07 PM GMT
    SamRising saidSouthPawPete, Is this similar to the recipe you used for Fennel-Ginger Sauerkraut? Sounds wonderful.

    Fennel Ginger Sauerkraut

    Print
    Prep time
    20 mins
    Fermentation time
    2-6 weeks

    Author: Fermenters Club
    Recipe type: Fermented vegetable
    Yield: About 4 quarts/4 liters
    Ingredients
    5-6 lbs./2.5 kg red or green cabbage (about 2 medium heads)
    3 Tablespoons/45 mL sea salt
    2 medium to large fennel bulb
    6" to 8" (15 to 20cm) fresh ginger
    1 teaspoon/5 mL dried caraway seeds
    ½ teaspoon/3 mL dried juniper berries


    http://www.fermentersclub.com/fennel-ginger-sauerkraut/


    Sam, this looks like a nice recipe for fennel flavored sauerkraut. But for my small batch, I used three bulbs of fennel with some nice fresh ginger and fennel seed. So no cabbage was involved. This made for some very intense pickled fennel.

    My batch size varies around 2kg which only about half fills a 5L crock. After fermentation, I usually transfer everything to smaller containers in my frig and restart the crock with a new batch.

    As for salt proportions, I stick to the crock manufacturer's recommendations: 5-8gm(15gm max.) per kg of contents. Their brine recommendation is 15gm per liter. And only sea salt. Iodine plays havoc with the bacteria.

    Harsch's recommendation for optimum fermentation temps is 15° - 18°C or 59° to 64°F So my earlier mention of 72° is probably wrong, but that was another source.
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    Feb 21, 2015 8:35 PM GMT
    Between 55F/12.8C and 80F/26.7C is what I read for pickling cukes and vegetables. Above 80 things get mushy. Below 55 slows down the fermenting.
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    Feb 21, 2015 10:48 PM GMT
    Sadly, most traditional doctors don't have a fucking clue about any of this.
    And worse still - they don't want to know.

    It's so much easier for them to please the drug companies and just reach for their prescription pad and write out a prescription for the latest drug.
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    Feb 22, 2015 1:48 AM GMT
    OP you're a sexy beast for posting this. I also love digestive enzymes; if you don't digest food well.
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    Feb 22, 2015 2:05 AM GMT
    FOUND IT!
    Paper on Bacterial Fermentation in the archives of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Which tells you more than you would think to ask for like:

    The detoxification of cassava through fermentation includes an acid fermentation, during which time the cyanogenic glycosides are hydrolysed to liberate the toxic cyanide gas.


    http://www.fao.org/docrep/x0560e/x0560e10.htm
  • InsatiableBlo...

    Posts: 442

    Feb 22, 2015 2:09 AM GMT
    AnOriginal saidOP you're a sexy beast for posting this. I also love digestive enzymes; if you don't digest food well.


    I will have to look into those.

    Right now I'm looking into the affects of Lactobacillus Rhamnosus, apparently in can help "regulate emotional behavior"..in mice..

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21876150
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    Feb 22, 2015 2:50 AM GMT


    Our biology is a mystery but historically our bodies arose from primordial muck, which was likely quite rich in probiotics of infinite variety.

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    Feb 22, 2015 5:49 AM GMT
    SouthPawPete saidAs for salt proportions, I stick to the crock manufacturer's recommendations: 5-8gm(15gm max.) per kg of contents. Their brine recommendation is 15gm per liter. And only sea salt. Iodine plays havoc with the bacteria.

    In Linda Ziedrich's book that I referenced above she says,
    If you want fully sour pickles that aren't overly salty, use a 5 percent brine; at room temperature the fermentation will last two to four weeks. Full-sours are suitable for canning.
    If you like salty pickles and want a slower fermentation--of six to eight weeks, say---use a 7 to 8 percent brine. With stronger brines, though, lactic-acid fermentation happens more slowly, so more yeast and gas develop, and cucumber pickles often become "bloaters"-- hollow, floating pickles. Mold is more likely to develop, too.

    She then has some tables that I found less than helpful and confusing, partly because she specifies a gallon of water, which is way more than I want because I use a wide mouth quart jar.

    If you use a digital scale and have a calculator that does percentages (e.g., MobiCalc for Android) it turns out to be trivially easy. If you're not sure you're pressing the right buttons on your calculator calculate a percentage of 100; for example, 8% of 100 should be 8, 5% of 100 should be 5, etc. Once you've got that part figured out then you can plug in any quantity you want.

    A quart of water is 4 cups, and a cup of water weights about 250 grams, so I could start with 1000 grams of water (aka a liter).

    5% of 1000 grams is 50 grams. Take a container that holds a little more than a liter. But maybe that's too much, so let's start with half a liter, or 500 grams of water. Which means that our 5% of salt drops to 25 grams. Put your quart jar on the scale, zero the scale, and put in 25 grams of pickling salt. Now add enough water to bring the weight up to 500 grams. And, et voilà, you have a 5% brine. So now if you want to make a 6% or 7% brine solution, or start with 400 grams of water, it's easy as pie. Basically you subtract from the total water the weight of the salt, but rather than do the math let your digital scale do it for you.
  • InsatiableBlo...

    Posts: 442

    Feb 23, 2015 2:15 AM GMT
    Even the Michael J. Fox foundation is looking into the gut and the microbes that live there for clues into Parkinson's Disease.

    Excerpt:
    "Nearly 80 percent of people with PD have constipation, and this condition often predates the motor symptoms of Parkinson's by several years"

    https://www.michaeljfox.org/mobile/news-detail.php?gut-check-on-parkinson-new-findings-on-bacteria-levels
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    Feb 23, 2015 4:10 AM GMT
    I had some miso soup today -- I thought it would help a tummy ache and it made it worse :-( I took some ginger pills and tums.
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    Feb 23, 2015 8:35 PM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal said
    SouthPawPete saidAs for salt proportions, I stick to the crock manufacturer's recommendations: 5-8gm(15gm max.) per kg of contents. Their brine recommendation is 15gm per liter. And only sea salt. Iodine plays havoc with the bacteria.


    Lumpy, I use an Ohaus scale, and weigh all ingredients. The math isn't hard but every source/book has their own rule of thumb. So comparing recommendations gets confusing real fast. Even the Harsch guidelines I quoted you are a mixed message since "5-8gm(15gm max.) per kg" is by weight while "15gm per liter" is by volume.
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    Feb 23, 2015 9:23 PM GMT
    SouthPawPete saidLumpy, I use an Ohaus scale, and weigh all ingredients. The math isn't hard but every source/book has their own rule of thumb. So comparing recommendations gets confusing real fast. Even the Harsch guidelines I quoted you are a mixed message since "5-8gm(15gm max.) per kg" is by weight while "15gm per liter" is by volume.

    With sauerkraut you don't use water, right? You shred the cabbage and sprinkle salt on it as you add it in layers to the crock as I remember. Then the cabbage weeps out water and makes its own brine.

    The recipe I gave is for things where you're making a brine solution and then submerging the vegetables in that.

    Thanks for bringing that up.
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    Feb 24, 2015 12:38 AM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal said
    With sauerkraut you don't use water, right? You shred the cabbage and sprinkle salt on it as you add it in layers to the crock as I remember. Then the cabbage weeps out water and makes its own brine.

    The recipe I gave is for things where you're making a brine solution and then submerging the vegetables in that.

    Thanks for bringing that up.


    Lumpy, you've got that correct. You don't have to use a water brine. Depends on how juicy your material is. Also bare in mind, as you load the crock, you pound the material a bit to help expel the water.

    Harsch's 'rule of thumb' here is after you fill the crock, tamp it down and place the stones on top, you should have 3-4 cm. depth of liquid on top of the stones. They say if you don't then add brine. Of course, this will also depend on the size of your batch. More material expels more liquid.

    But Harsch's rule here is a bit confusing. Assuming you've salted your material already, then had to add brine. If their brine is already 15gm salt per L water, then by adding brine have you already exceeded their max?

    Since I tend to make small batches, I usually have to play it this way and I've never had a problem with a batch going bad. But maybe my formulations aren't "optimal"?