Do you still get sore?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 25, 2015 11:02 PM GMT
    For those who are seasoned jocks, do you still get sore when you work out? Do you constantly have to change things up to get your muscles feeling that "soreness" again? I'm talking about soreness like after a workout (maybe a day or so).

    Do you like the sore feeling? or are you happy when it stops happening?

    My legs aren't getting as sore anymore from running, which is great because now I feel like I'm in general better shape....but then again kind of frustrating because I feel like I'm not doing as much and I'm plateauing.

    I felt like when I lifted weights on a regular basis, my upper body would remain sore for longer, vice my legs are doing from cardio.
  • wesv

    Posts: 907

    Feb 26, 2015 1:25 AM GMT
    I still do with pecs. With other muscles I don't really feel the sore unless I work them the next day. But with biceps, I do not feel soreness in them at all.
  • smart_hunk

    Posts: 1

    Feb 26, 2015 8:38 PM GMT
    Didn't much working out with weights. But after switching to bodyweight workouts (Convict Conditioning), everything feels sore the day after! Key difference is that it's progressive, so I'm always pushing myself to the next level.
  • Svnw688

    Posts: 3350

    Feb 26, 2015 9:40 PM GMT
    I don't know if I qualify as a "seasoned jock," but I'm a trained ballet dancer and avid runner.

    If I miss a class or running session, I "feel" it the next time, and it hurts. Sore? Not usually.

    I tend to only get sore if I do an activity I haven't done before. The other day the elevators were slow (there are 3, 1 was down for maintenance, and another was 'locked' for someone moving in/out), so I walked from my pent house on floor 30 to the parking deck on floor 5. I wasn't winded at all, and I thought my jot down the steps was nothing. But my calves burned the next day. I never would have guessed that would happen.
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    Feb 27, 2015 3:05 AM GMT
    I used to get DOMS for days when I first started lifting. Now I'm usually a bit sore when I wake up, but worst case scenario I use my foam roller and I'm good to for the day. But my legs and chest still get the worst DOMS to this day.
  • BloodFlame

    Posts: 1768

    Feb 27, 2015 5:49 AM GMT
    I haven't done any weighted exercises so most of my exercises has been bodyweight (squats, lunges, pushups, etc.).

    I do get sore, especially on leg day but it's a good sore lol. I'm kinda addicted to doing squats after getting used to them but man, do they do get me sore after the exercise session is over. Like yesterday and today, was my leg day and right now, they are still feeling sore haha.

    On arms and chest day where I usually just do pushups and recently, chair-ups, I do feel it in my chest and biceps.

    But OP.. Hmm that's an interesting dilemma. Do your legs get sore from squats or anything like that?
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    Feb 27, 2015 6:11 AM GMT
    Well, there is the warm fuzzy "soreness" from a day well spent.
    Then there is the agony of DOMS.
    Then there is the mover fracking cramps. OMFG. icon_eek.gif Once, I got massive pec cramps in the middle of a crowded movie theater. My friends thought I was having a heart attack. I had to get up and spend the rest of the movie standing in the back of the theater, stretching. (The new "Get Smart" iirc)
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    Feb 27, 2015 12:05 PM GMT
    I certainly feel that sometimes you just get to a point where your muscles are at the most effective and efficient they are going to be so IF they are, not having them sore but being able to maintain that is a goal.

    However no one is perfect (or will be) so variation in routine is a good idea and I think some soreness somewhere is a good sign.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 27, 2015 6:04 PM GMT
    Yeah I still get sore, but only because I take frequent breaks from a week or more from working out just so I can get sore. If I'm not getting sore, I don't feel like I'm making progress.
  • Svnw688

    Posts: 3350

    Feb 27, 2015 6:10 PM GMT
    paulflexes saidYeah I still get sore, but only because I take frequent breaks from a week or more from working out just so I can get sore. If I'm not getting sore, I don't feel like I'm making progress.


    Makes sense. "No pain, no gain."
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    Feb 28, 2015 1:33 AM GMT
    When I saw the topic and that the last poster was Svn I thought it was going to be about the morning after a long session of power bottoming...
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    Feb 28, 2015 3:18 AM GMT
    Im dreading going back ( not really) I stopped 6-8 weeks ago ( for various reasons) I miss it. Actually, I so want to go back…. desperately… icon_cry.gif
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    Feb 28, 2015 5:50 AM GMT
    Wyndahoi saidWhen I saw the topic and that the last poster was Svn I thought it was going to be about the morning after a long session of power bottoming...
    You're just jealous that the OP won't power-top you. icon_twisted.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 28, 2015 3:27 PM GMT
    Just my legs, not the rest of my body.
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    Feb 28, 2015 4:44 PM GMT
    At the risk of sounding - paternal, shall we say? - stiffness and soreness only increase w/ age. I didn't understand this until my 50s, when I started to notice little pains popping up and persisting; you can tell younger people about this but they won't really understand and appreciate it until it starts happening to them. But, and I swim 1500-1750m every other day and walk and bike a more than usual amount for my age (62), the only way to combat these things is to nip them in the bud. Those orthos and PTs are there for a reason, and so are Ben-Gay, aspirin, and anti-inflammatories, along with all the special exercises and devices you can use to do deal w/ these things; I drink a Joint Juice at least every other day. At the same time, keep mobile and flexible, and don't let these things get you down, as they will if left untreated or, worse, exacerbated by too much of the exercise that led to them in the first place.* Good luck!
    _____
    *I was totally surprised to be told that my knee pain came from 50+ years of doing the frog kick used in breaststroke. Apparently, a lot of world class breaststrokers - of which I am decidedly not one - suffer a great deal from this condition. Solution? "Dumb it down" a bit, and don't overextend the knee extension or exaggerate the "snap" in the kick - unless you're competing for a spot on the Olympic team. Our knees just weren't made to perform that way!
  • ThatSwimmerGu...

    Posts: 3755

    Feb 28, 2015 4:53 PM GMT
    Not unless I change things up such as making a set a super set by adding push-ups within it. Or look up on a fitness website how to do a new workout.
  • jrc2005

    Posts: 74

    Feb 28, 2015 6:46 PM GMT
    My pecs used to be the only reliably sore muscle, but even they don't do that much anymore. Lately it's calves and sometimes quads. On occassion I'll kill my triceps, too, and since I don't do crunches much anymore, crunches on the Swiss ball will do it, too.
  • Svnw688

    Posts: 3350

    Feb 28, 2015 10:27 PM GMT
    Wyndahoi saidWhen I saw the topic and that the last poster was Svn I thought it was going to be about the morning after a long session of power bottoming...


    LMAO, I love it. Truth is the truth.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 01, 2015 12:26 AM GMT
    Svnw688 said
    Wyndahoi saidWhen I saw the topic and that the last poster was Svn I thought it was going to be about the morning after a long session of power bottoming...


    LMAO, I love it. Truth is the truth.


    There's no judgment from me. I was disappointed I was mistaken...
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 01, 2015 9:13 AM GMT
    Pain is weakness leaving your body.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 01, 2015 10:31 AM GMT
    As I've gotten older, I very rarely get sore. I really have to push it. My body is so adapted after 40 years of lifting that hitting that limit is difficult... plus...I train more smartly.
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    Mar 01, 2015 5:45 PM GMT
    MGINSD saidAt the risk of sounding - paternal, shall we say? - stiffness and soreness only increase w/ age. I didn't understand this until my 50s, when I started to notice little pains popping up and persisting; you can tell younger people about this but they won't really understand and appreciate it until it starts happening to them. But, and I swim 1500-1750m every other day and walk and bike a more than usual amount for my age (62), the only way to combat these things is to nip them in the bud. Those orthos and PTs are there for a reason, and so are Ben-Gay, aspirin, and anti-inflammatories, along with all the special exercises and devices you can use to do deal w/ these things; I drink a Joint Juice at least every other day. At the same time, keep mobile and flexible, and don't let these things get you down, as they will if left untreated or, worse, exacerbated by too much of the exercise that led to them in the first place.* Good luck!
    _____
    *I was totally surprised to be told that my knee pain came from 50+ years of doing the frog kick used in breaststroke. Apparently, a lot of world class breaststrokers - of which I am decidedly not one - suffer a great deal from this condition. Solution? "Dumb it down" a bit, and don't overextend the knee extension or exaggerate the "snap" in the kick - unless you're competing for a spot on the Olympic team. Our knees just weren't made to perform that way!


    man, ain't this the truth. the older I get, the more of those random pains I get. and I'm only 32. I probably get more sore now than I did at 22. Having shin splints only makes things worse when it comes to cardio too. Advil is my friend.

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    Mar 02, 2015 4:19 AM GMT
    MGINSD said "I didn't understand this until my 50s, when I started to notice little pains popping up and persisting; you can tell younger people about this but they won't really understand and appreciate it until it starts happening to them."

    willular said "man, ain't this the truth. the older I get, the more of those random pains I get. and I'm only 32. I probably get more sore now than I did at 22."

    So true, so true -- things fall apart the older you get, often for no apparent reason, and recovery takes much longer. But 32? WILLULAR, you haven't even reached your physical peak yet. You've got so much to look forward to! icon_wink.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 02, 2015 11:49 AM GMT
    Notice often get DOMS after using weights to train hard; rarely with resistance bands, and sometimes with body weight exercises.

    Try as hard as I could, still couldn't get DOMS with Pilates (yet).
  • nicelyproport...

    Posts: 573

    Mar 02, 2015 12:03 PM GMT
    My upper body rarely gets sore. But my legs have been sore ever since I can remember. Rowing crew in college, then working as a bike messenger, now running 30 miles per week -- all these have taken a toll. The soreness is not something I notice on a day-to-day basis. But if I get a massage, there are areas in my legs so sensitive that the slightest pressure can almost catapult me off the massage table.