Revelation (The Book of Revelation) Is Not Just a Christian Work but Jewish and Roman

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    Mar 01, 2015 7:22 PM GMT
    In other places of the New Testament, the literature goes to great lengths not to be confrontational with Rome. It is not the case here--not so Jesus-like/Christian. Pre-Jewish Revolt, especially in the late 20s and early 30s during the time of the biblical Jesus much care was taken to be discreet about confronting Rome. The Jewish Revolt happened, the Jews lost, and Revelation was written. Even though "like a Son of Man" factors into Christianity's failed Son of Man movement and Son of Man appears in Revelation, it originates from the Jewish religion which gives a Jewish claim on Revelation also.

    The Book of Revelation was written during the reign of Emperor Domitian. You say the symbolism of Revelation is revealed at last. At Rev. 1: 16, his face was like the Sun (a star); 17) I fell at his feet, 18 ) I am the Living One. We know that unlike the dead deities of posthumously deified Caesars, Domitian was a Living One.

    While Rev. 21: 1 speaks of a new heaven and a new earth, Domitian's poet Statius speaks of "new stars in another heaven." So, for this and more significant reasons, Revelation has Jewish, Christian, Jewish Revolt, and Roman references.

    Who dare call it a sad sepulchre? Seeing the husband’s just devotion,
    One might readily exclaim: ‘Yes, I see that this is a minister of one
    Who lately created a shrine for his eternal race, and set new stars
    In another heaven.' - The Silvae of Statius, v, I, "Consolation on the Death of Priscilla"

    At Rev. 21: 1-2, Revelation speaks not of the Earth we live on and the Heaven (Space) we see from Earth because they have passed away. In the poem above, Priscilla has passed away (her husband devoted to her), never to see Earth and Sky/Heaven/Space again. Compare with Rev. 21: 1-2: a new heaven and a new earth ... Jerusalem prepared as a bride adorned for her husband.
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    Mar 03, 2015 11:25 PM GMT
    StephenOABC said

    Who dare call it a sad sepulchre? Seeing the husband’s just devotion,
    One might readily exclaim: ‘Yes, I see that this is a minister of one
    Who lately created a shrine for his eternal race, and set new stars
    In another heaven.' - The Silvae of Statius, v, I, "Consolation on the Death of Priscilla"



    More like, "Consolation for a Husband on the Death of His Wife, Priscilla"

    http://www.poetryintranslation.com/PITBR/Latin/StatiusSilvaeBkV.htm#anchor_Toc318276813