braking

  • jeep334

    Posts: 409

    Mar 09, 2015 2:35 AM GMT
    I have long maintained that in practicing the safest way to brake while operating a motor vehicle was to always keep the your car in gear. I've read discussions where putting your transmission into neutral will allow the 'driving force' to not come into play which could allow the vehicle to accelerate rather than decelerate. I have always thought that keeping the transmission engaged allows for better control. Going into skids, operating on curves and slippery pavement all call for specific action but I have always thought having control over the car by being able to accelerate at any given time was the better practice. Any thoughts on this? Thanks for the time.

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    Mar 09, 2015 2:39 AM GMT
    You push on the clutch pedal when you're braking? I think that's what I remember doing. Left foot pushed the clutch pedal, right foot moved from the gas pedal to the brake pedal.

    (To be honest, I don't miss a manual transmission one bit.)
  • jeep334

    Posts: 409

    Mar 09, 2015 2:41 AM GMT
    It doesn't matter if it's a manual or automatic. The discussions I've seen are talking in terms of an automatic.

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    Mar 09, 2015 2:55 AM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal saidYou push on the clutch pedal when you're braking

    manual transmission:
    -if you really jam on the brake you will need to engage the clutch or the engine will try to stall
    -for lite braking you dont need the clutch.

    for the average grocery getter an automatic is fine.

    a simple automatic transmission
    well an automatic is made for idiots. be an idiot or not; normal driving you keep it in drive, thats the "D". Normally dont remove it out of D while the car is moving unless you really know what your doing

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    Mar 09, 2015 3:00 AM GMT
    I can't imagine shifting out of gear into neutral with an automatic when braking.

    I've also heard that with an automatic transmission shifting into neutral when going down hills is bad for the transmission. But I heard this long ago.

    With my car the shifter is a straight vertical line, Park at the top, Reverse, Neutral, then Drive. I have to press a button on the shifter to shift from Drive into Neutral. If I were to shift to Neutral and accidentally go too far then it would go into Reverse. Seems like that would be a problem (read disaster) if I'm going forward.
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    Mar 09, 2015 3:04 AM GMT
    I'm trying to think of situations where you'd ever put it in neutral when you have an automatic transmission. Perhaps if you're being towed by another car. Tow trucks tow cars with the drive end raised off the ground. Or it was always the rear end on my old truck. I wonder if they tow it with the rear end on the ground if you have front wheel drive?
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    Mar 09, 2015 3:06 AM GMT
    If in an automatic then taking the car out of gear while driving puts you at risk of throwing it into reverse which might aid in braking especially if it falls off the car and drags on the street some but probably at worst you'll just get some interesting grinding noises to accompany your braking, which will alert you to pull that lever leading to truck deployed parachute.

    On a manual, downshifting is most of the fun of braking.

    So the one braking risks breaking your neck, the other risks ruining your fun. I personally don't care for either option but you go with whatever makes you happy and takes out the least number of pedestrians.
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    Mar 09, 2015 3:22 AM GMT
    Generally I have always avoided braking. Either slow in advance of a curve or simply shift down and let the engine do the work. You can brake lightly without depressing the clutch but it's a waste of energy.

    Sadly, the 328i that I bought is hobbled with an automatic. Its just not natural to shift it. Sometimes, I forget to shift up from "sport mode" (3 icon_rolleyes.gif ) when I hit the interstate after the cliff road. The thing is so smooth, I can't tell the difference unless I notice that the gas mileage gauge is in the toilet. Can't really see the shifter indicator when my eyes are on the road.
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    Mar 09, 2015 3:29 AM GMT
    mindgarden saidGenerally I have always avoided braking...
    yes its so counter productive while driving.
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    Mar 09, 2015 3:54 AM GMT
    My car has an instantaneous gas mileage indicator as well as how well it's done for the current tank of gas. I can see the instantaneous one shoot up to 60 when I let my foot off the gas for an upcoming red light.

    And it always gets much better gas mileage when the cruise control is on. It's annoying that the cruise control shuts itself off when the speed drops below 25 since it's still effective around here in the burbs where the speed limit is typically 35. The cruise control is effective with city/burb driving because it has some radar thing in front and can maintain a distance from a car in front of me. It's annoying to have to keep turning it back on after a red light and having to wait until I get over 25 before I can turn it on.
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    Mar 09, 2015 4:48 PM GMT
    In some states, coasting out of gear is actually illegal. Reason: it eliminates engine compression as part of the stopping force, should you need to do so. Also, especially in automatics, it's not good for the tranny, even if you rev up to speed when re-engaging it. Leave it in gear, and apply the clutch only before you come to a stop or just before the engine starts to "buck."
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    Mar 09, 2015 5:17 PM GMT
    Actually, I learned that lesson the hard way when I was about 14 or 15 years old. I was baling hay on a steep hillside. I think I was trying to downshift, but the mass of the baler just accelerated the whole rig to the point that I couldn't get the old tractor transmission back into gear. The mass of the baler also made the old mechanical brakes useless. If the tractor hadn't bounced and rolled first, I would have plowed into the side of a house at the bottom of the hill. Rapidly, I invented a new form of braking: steering the feed chute of the baler into a nice new wooden fence that happened to run more or less parallel to my path. icon_surprised.gif
    So, I spent the next week rebuilding fence, which cost me a bit more than I would have made from the hay-making, but less than getting rolled under a tractor would have. icon_redface.gif
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    Mar 09, 2015 8:23 PM GMT
    Most of the car now-days are equipped with Anti-locks brakes , keep the car in gear and depress the brake pedal ....
    I never , and i mean never shift the transmission in neutral when i am driving , only when i am coming to a complete stop , then i shift and neutral and keep my left foot off the clutch pedal .
    If a drive an automatic , i shift to neutral after a complete stop , only if i know i will be stationary for more than 3 mn ( railways crossing , traffic jam and so on )
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    Mar 09, 2015 8:59 PM GMT
    Even seen the signs coming down from a mountain "6% grade trucks Use lower gear"?

    Lower gears aid braking. Neutral gearing hurts braking....to the point of fade or failure. That's why there are emergency run offs.

    I prefer manual transmissions, certainly in sports cars. Often I like to downshift BEFORE a corner, it settles the rear end so it squats and hugs better. An automatic doesn't know what's coming and can feel floaty when entering a curve.
  • Apparition

    Posts: 3521

    Mar 10, 2015 3:30 AM GMT
    for the first 40 years of my life, braking was best accomplished by pulling the string so the bell rang.

    now it is best accomplished by keeping a hundred yards back and just having to slow down a bit.