Keratosis Pilaris

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 10, 2015 11:29 PM GMT
    Hey everyone,

    So the skin disorder Keratosis Pilaris (KP) is one of the things that has really made me afraid of dating and well, possibly going further intimately with someone. For those who don't know, probably a lot, it's basically these small bumps on your skin caused by a keratin build up. It's genetic/hereditary and cold weather makes it worse.

    Ever since I came to the US to study, there have been some guys that I've been interested in. Due to the weather in NY, I'd have to cover up and it also got very cold. I never experienced weather like that before, and the KP got worse and I didn't know what to do. That was 2 years ago, and now it's basically these dark dots all over my back, triceps, and butt cheeks/thighs.

    I've seen a dermatologist and he said that there's nothing that can be done besides moisturize and use these creams that reduce the bumpiness. I have no more bumpiness, just the dark dots.

    Do you think that if a guy had these spots on his skin, would that be a turn off to you and make you not want to date him?

    (also if anyone has any suggestions on improving KP, please let me know!)

    Thanks for everyone's time and advice icon_smile.gif
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    Mar 10, 2015 11:31 PM GMT
    I don't know how severe your pilaris is, but no, I probably wouldn't have a problem. I may be little curious, but if you are hot then I wouldn't get too freaked out about it.
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    Mar 10, 2015 11:51 PM GMT
    jmusmc85 saidI don't know how severe your pilaris is, but no, I probably wouldn't have a problem. I may be little curious, but if you are hot then I wouldn't get too freaked out about it.


    It's noticeable, but it's not bumpy if you move your hand over the locations. For me, it's just the dark dots as a result of it.

    Thank you for your reply. It gives me some degree of hope. I really appreciate it icon_smile.gif
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    Mar 11, 2015 4:11 AM GMT
    I have it too, recently diagnosed, but a mild version, mostly on my upper thighs, but will get on my forehead as well. Hard to tell from regular acne because the two are so closely related and the treatment for each are quite different. Its frustrating at times. After all my research on both, The KP seems to contribute to acne. Acne we know is caused by dead skin cells mixed with over abundance of sebum (oil) clogging pores. The over growth of keratin (KP), within the hair follicles creates the over abundance of dead skin cells (dryness). We also know that the sebum oil comes thru the hair follicle shaft, lubricating the hair as it grows.

    So we have two separate issues going on, combination skin-oily/dryness

    Acne: over abundance of oil (treatment: control the oil production)
    KP: over abundance of dead skin (treatment: control the dead skin)


    http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1070651-overview

    Keratosis Pilaris affects nearly 50-80% of all adolescents and approximately 40% of adults. It is frequently noted in otherwise asymptomatic patients visiting dermatologists for other conditions. Most people with keratosis pilaris are unaware the condition has a designated medical term or that it is treatable. In general, keratosis pilaris is frequently cosmetically displeasing but medically harmless.

    What’s Your Skin Type?
    http://www.webmd.com/beauty/face/whats-your-skin-type

    The best treatment for both, I have found, depending on severity of each condition, is mild exfoliation, benzoyl peroxide and a heavy moisturizer containing lactic acid or urea. You want to control both the oil and the dead skin without over drying. Lactic acid or Urea will control the KP, while benzoyl peroxide controls the oil. Exfoliating gloves will control both and give your skin a smoother look. Exfoliating, too harsh if every day, seems to be the ultimate treatment for KP. Believe me, took me forever to figure this stuff out, let me know if you have any questions. Many people, especially guys, don't know they also have KP and dermatologists confuse it with acne. Start with these treatments and see how much or little to use each. You will find a happy medium.

    ERT004_Xl.jpg
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    Mar 11, 2015 5:59 AM GMT
    Dark spots?, you probably have Seborrhoeic Keratosis, not Keratosis Pilaris. They are both inherited-genetic conditions. KP is also called "chicken skin" or "goose bumps", because it looks that way and does 'come out' more in cold climates. I don't know much about the dark spots of Seborrhoeic Keratosis except they are still over growths of keratin. Still, try alpha hydroxy creams with lactic acids or urea in them and get a pair of exfoliating gloves. Over time and usage, you might be able to diminish the dark spots.

    I do have the "chicken skin", which mimics acne, but only on my thighs, near my hairline and sometimes on my upper back. Im glad mine is a very mild condition that I can control. But I still get frustrated having to go through the daily routine.



    Seborrhoeic Keratosis

    img0089.jpg

    Keratosis Pilaris

    5T-0022.jpg
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    Mar 11, 2015 12:04 PM GMT
    Yes, I have that condition and the people of my village make me wear a bell around my neck and I must shout, "Unclean!" as I move about from place to place.

    Joking, of course.

    It has NEVER been a problem. Sex partners have never mentioned it.
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    Mar 11, 2015 12:24 PM GMT
    I had that too just on my arms and shoulders.
    After some research, speaking to a dermatologist and also a dermatherapist (more cosmetic than medical), I've come up with a regimen that has actually smoothed my keratosis pilaris a lot.

    It takes time and you won't see results straight away but over the course of time (I'm not sure how long as I stopped paying attention until someone told me the skin on my arms felt softer).

    Purchase loofah gloves or a loofah scrub and any kind of face wash that has at least 2% salicylic acid as part of it's ingredients.
    This is because the salicylic acid helps penetrate the dried pores that the skin condition leaves you with and the loofah will help exfoliate the dead skin cells away.
    I usually just do that whenever I shower.

    Then for moisturisation I use a Cetaphil lotion that is oil-free, non-acnegenic and non-comedogenic (meaning the lotion won't clog your pores as much as normal lotion).
    It's also SPF 30+ and safe to use for your face or body.

    The reason for the SPF protection is because with keratosis pilaris, sun exposure to the skin irritates the KP areas more and produces more dead skin cells. Since our pores in the KP areas are naturally dry, they just trap dead skin cells faster making the red spots much more visible.

    Doing this has reduced my red and dark spots significantly.
    I used to have it really bad on my arms and shoulders and with this regimen it's completely disappeared off my shoulders and has only left me with minor bumps on the arms but the few red spots you can only see if you look right up close to my arms.

    I also live in a very hot and sunny country and have had no flares up wearing singlets on hot days at all.
    Give it a try and hopefully it works for you icon_smile.gif
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    Mar 11, 2015 4:56 PM GMT
    I only have them on the top of my shoulders , they came up after i got really sunburned when i was 13 , but they never migrated anywhere else on my body , so i think the doctors i have inquired to in the past were wrong .
    Beside that , i have enough scars on my body ( crash )which people always ask questions about ...You will grow out of that embarrassment pretty fast , when you regain confidence of how your body look .
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    Mar 11, 2015 5:15 PM GMT
    Thank you guys so much for your insightful replies, I really appreciate it! I am going to look into other treatments. I heard that a product called AmLactin was the best moisturizer for KP.

    Also, I'm going to just work harder on getting my body to where I want it to be (fitness wise) and try and put the KP behind me. I will just have to find a guy that will be able to accept that KP is a part of me I can't get rid of and hopefully someone out there can accept that.

    Again, thank you guys so much! I didn't think I'd have a place to ask about this without feeling bad, but you guys made me feel a lot better.
  • metta

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    Mar 12, 2015 1:28 PM GMT
    I don't think it matters, but I would be curious to know if professional microdermabrasion would help over time since it helps to remove the dead skin cells.
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    Mar 12, 2015 2:33 PM GMT
    metta8 saidI don't think it matters, but I would curious to know if professional microdermabrasion would help over time since it helps to remove the dead skin cells.

    When I spoke to my dermatherapist she said it definitely would but even doing microdermabrasion, you'll need to do that consistently for almost a year before you start to see visible results.

    Since I didn't have that money she pretty much said exfoliating gloves and salicylic acid is the cheaper alternative but obviously takes longer.

    You'll get there eventually either way.
    At least that's what has worked for me anyway.
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    Mar 13, 2015 12:54 AM GMT
    The pictures at the top of this forum aren't that bad. I think this is a case of self-consciousness. We are our own harshest critics. Some skin bumps or discolorations is definitely not a deal-breaker by any means. Sexiness is an entire package, not any one particular thing or feature.
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    Mar 13, 2015 5:23 AM GMT
    It's so incredibly common; almost half the population has it. It's not a big deal medically but it doesn't look so great.

    I, too, have this issue and it bothers me way more than partners who don't seem to notice or care at all. We're all our own worst critics. That said it's extremely difficult to get rid of as it's chronic and most forms of exfoliation can't penetrate the skin to where the keratin build up is located. Try using a beta hydroxy acid treatment like salicylic acid which can penetrate the skin along with a mixture of olive oil and sugar rubbed topically which helps to break up the keratin while simultaneously providing moisture. You have to be consistent if you want to see results as there is no cure for this. Some may find the above tedious and forgo any treatment though as it is not necessary to treat and not a problem, medically-speaking.
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    Mar 13, 2015 6:06 AM GMT
    metta8 saidI don't think it matters, but I would be curious to know if professional microdermabrasion would help over time since it helps to remove the dead skin cells.



    Cost wise, a big no. This is not a one time thing where you can dish out $500 one day and then do it again the next week, its genetic and chronic and this procedure is not covered by insurance because its considered cosmetic regardless if its a genetic condition, insurance company would throw a fit at that price if you tried to bill them for it. Frequent visits to dermatology through insurance costs plenty already, especially when you combine the two conditions together, acne and KP.

    Its been my experience to get the official KP diagnoses from a dermatologist and then figure out what inexpensive home treatments work the best for your skin. I found out about the exfoliating glove use through watching doctors on You Tube. Over time, I have about a year using the gloves, my skin has definitely smoothed over and control of the KP and any acne is pretty easy now. You just cant over do using the gloves, that will cause a reverse effect.
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    Mar 13, 2015 6:15 AM GMT
    whereibelong saidIt's so incredibly common; almost half the population has it. It's not a big deal medically but it doesn't look so great.

    I, too, have this issue and it bothers me way more than partners who don't seem to notice or care at all. We're all our own worst critics. That said it's extremely difficult to get rid of as it's chronic and most forms of exfoliation can't penetrate the skin to where the keratin build up is located. Try using a beta hydroxy acid treatment like salicylic acid which can penetrate the skin along with a mixture of olive oil and sugar rubbed topically which helps to break up the keratin while simultaneously providing moisture. You have to be consistent if you want to see results as there is no cure for this. Some may find the above tedious and forgo any treatment though as it is not necessary to treat and not a problem, medically-speaking.



    I stay away from using salicylic acid, which is actually for acne (oil drying). KP is already a drying condition to begin with. For KP, you want to moisturize, with creams, lotions that dissolve keratin, not for drying skin oil. If you want to control skin oil, only use benzoyl peroxide. This is why many people, including dermatologists, confuse acne with KP. They are related, but treatment is very different.
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    Mar 13, 2015 6:17 AM GMT
    I dated a guy for a while (okay, not exacted dated but more of a regular hookup.) He was extremely hot but he always wanted to keep his shirt on during sex. This bugged the hell out of me because he had a rocking body. Every time I would get my hands under his shirt he would move my hands and get noticeably upset. Finally one night while he was climaxing I got my hands under his shirt and realized what he was so self conscious of; he had large patches of skin that felt quite literally like sand paper, and no I'm not exaggerating. I continued to rub the area to let him know I was okay with it. I still don't know what the condition is called but it was definitely much more pronounced than what you describe. And it really wasn't a problem for me.
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    Mar 13, 2015 11:09 PM GMT
    Radd saidI dated a guy for a while (okay, not exacted dated but more of a regular hookup.) He was extremely hot but he always wanted to keep his shirt on during sex. This bugged the hell out of me because he had a rocking body. Every time I would get my hands under his shirt he would move my hands and get noticeably upset. Finally one night while he was climaxing I got my hands under his shirt and realized what he was so self conscious of; he had large patches of skin that felt quite literally like sand paper, and no I'm not exaggerating. I continued to rub the area to let him know I was okay with it. I still don't know what the condition is called but it was definitely much more pronounced than what you describe. And it really wasn't a problem for me.


    This makes me feel a whole lot better. Firstly, because you weren't dating him so you weren't even on that level with him but were OK with it and secondly, that you really tried to comfort him about the condition. The world needs more guys like you Radd who'd accept the issue.

    Thank you for sharing that story icon_smile.gif