Irish Stew Is Tastier Than Corny Beef

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    Mar 18, 2015 2:47 AM GMT
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    NYT: The epitome of comfort food, traditional Irish stew has only a few ingredients: mutton, onions and potatoes. In southern Ireland carrots are added, and some cooks venture so far as to add turnips. These days, young lamb often replaces mutton for a more delicate version.

    http://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1017275-irish-stew
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    Mar 18, 2015 3:02 AM GMT
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    NYT: The epitome of comfort food, traditional Irish stew has only a few ingredients: mutton, onions and potatoes. In southern Ireland carrots are added, and some cooks venture so far as to add turnips. These days, young lamb often replaces mutton for a more delicate version.

    http://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1017275-irish-stew

    Lamb & turnips were indeed in my grandmother's stew, but over 60 years ago. Or sometimes beef, a more common US item that most native Irish didn't have until modern times.

    And her soups! Which looked even richer than this stew pic above, though the ingredients, many of them the same, were much smaller in size, with the addition of some pearl onions and tomatoes, and maybe some string beans. Everything went into the pot! It would take days to make, starting with a soup bone that simmered for at least a day itself, to release the marrow. It remains the best soup I've ever had in my entire life.
  • CX838

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    Mar 21, 2015 4:52 AM GMT
    It looks good n pretty easy. Much easier to cook and prepare a potion than cozido a portuguesa. So I usually make paella for celebration.

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    Mar 21, 2015 5:40 AM GMT
    Ahhhh... shrimp & mussels! I want some!
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    Mar 21, 2015 5:43 AM GMT
    That looks like Paella. No relation to Irish Stew, I think.
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Mar 21, 2015 8:51 AM GMT
    No one travels to Ireland for the food unless you grew up there eating lousy food. Same goes for England.icon_idea.gificon_idea.gif
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    Mar 21, 2015 3:22 PM GMT
    woodsmen said11KITCHEN-articleLarge.jpg

    NYT: The epitome of comfort food, traditional Irish stew has only a few ingredients: mutton, onions and potatoes. In southern Ireland carrots are added, and some cooks venture so far as to add turnips. These days, young lamb often replaces mutton for a more delicate version.

    http://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1017275-irish-stew


    Where are the peas??? icon_wink.gif
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    Mar 21, 2015 3:39 PM GMT
    They don't have beans in Ireland!
  • CX838

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    Mar 21, 2015 10:29 PM GMT
    woodsmen saidThat looks like Paella. No relation to Irish Stew, I think.

    Yea it is my home paella. Cause the Portuguese stew we called it cozido. It is pretty easy but hard to get everything like different sausages n pork, and at least 6 person potion. So I usually make paella. Pretty easy and everyone love it. Prawns, scallops, mussels, chicken, rabbit and sausage all in and done. And have a glass of homemade sangria.
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    Mar 21, 2015 11:53 PM GMT
    The purists would say that unless you cook Paella using Valencia wood, it is not Paella!
  • Scalese89

    Posts: 122

    Apr 18, 2015 2:24 PM GMT
    Irish Stew is amazing slow cooked. It's tender and healthy. I especially love having this meal in the winter. Now I'm hungry icon_neutral.gif
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    Apr 18, 2015 2:37 PM GMT
    Scalese89 saidIrish Stew is amazing slow cooked. It's tender and healthy. I especially love having this meal in the winter. Now I'm hungry icon_neutral.gif

    Stew or soup, I totally agree. I persuaded my late Italian partner to attempt making it, based on my vague memories. By then my mother was also dead, who could make it, too, after her Irish mother died. He did a really good job.

    But my current Italian partner still hasn't tried. He only wants to do Italian cooking. I can't cook at all myself. I would think that using a modern electric crock pot, which my family didn't have back in the 1950s, would make it even better.

    Because from what I remember as a kid, an important element was simmering for days. Each ingredient added one at time, depending on the ideal cooking time.