Kidney stones?

  • oldfart

    Posts: 328

    Mar 19, 2015 1:48 PM GMT
    So my husband's urologist warns 'don't eat too much protein - you'll get kidney stones!'

    Who uses a lot of protein supplement and had kidney stones, raise a hand.

    Also, who does the gram-per-pound (2g/k) of body weight rule?
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    Mar 19, 2015 2:11 PM GMT
    oldfart saidSo my husband's urologist warns 'don't eat too much protein ...
    we are taking the dog into have his kidney stones removed. thinking it mostly is genetic or you'r just by chance on the bad side of some statistic. Thats my contribution to realjock bro science.

    google is really your friend (not bro science) to develop answers to some of your questions.
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    Mar 19, 2015 10:21 PM GMT
    Staying well-hydrated goes a long way.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4863

    Mar 19, 2015 11:16 PM GMT
    There is considerable controversy about the cause of kidney stones. Probably there are multiple causes. A higher degree of hydration may help, but it is no guarantee.
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    Mar 19, 2015 11:22 PM GMT
    FRE0 saidThere is considerable controversy about the cause of kidney stones. Probably there are multiple causes. A higher degree of hydration may help, but it is no guarantee.

    Correct. From the Mayo Clinic:

    Kidney stones form when your urine contains more crystal-forming substances — such as calcium, oxalate and uric acid — than the fluid in your urine can dilute. At the same time, your urine may lack substances that prevent crystals from sticking together, creating an ideal environment for kidney stones to form.

    Factors linked to kidney stones:

    http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/kidney-stones/basics/risk-factors/con-20024829
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    Mar 20, 2015 1:42 AM GMT
    You're asking us for medical advice? If I were to answer your question, then that would assume I have established a doctor-patient relationship. You could then sue me if there is a bad outcome, and I have no malpractice insurance.

    Here's my best advice: listen to your doctor.
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    Mar 20, 2015 1:55 AM GMT
    CLTMike46 saidYou're asking us for medical advice? If I were to answer your question, then that would assume I have established a doctor-patient relationship. You could then sue me if there is a bad outcome, and I have no malpractice insurance.

    Here's my best advice: listen to your doctor.

    I always say consult a doctor in person, rather than rely solely upon online.

    At the same time, the OP was asking for general guidance about the cause of kidney stones. Whether his husband has them, or is at risk for getting them, none of us can say. I linked an authoritative reference above, the Mayo Clinic.

    But you can go online yourself and find this information, as background. I like to do that before I visit a doctor, for myself or my own husband, so we're not totally ignorant. And just so I can ask the right questions.

    When I've done that, and used the correct terms, I get the doctor's attention. He or she tends to open up, and is more forthcoming & disclosing to us than I think might otherwise happen, if we just sat there with blank faces.

    In any case, I insist on having doctors who allow patient participation in their own care. Because I've had many doctors who were strictly dictatorial. And yah know what? A lot of them got it wrong, and gave me the wrong diagnoses and treatment.

    So I've become a very skeptical patient, and I'll go online to get a variety of opinions. Not that I'll follow them, just use them to develop my own opinion, along with my doctor's.
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    Mar 20, 2015 2:44 AM GMT
    "Kidney stones form when your urine contains more crystal-forming substances — such as calcium, oxalate and uric acid — than the fluid in your urine can dilute. At the same time, your urine may lack substances that prevent crystals from sticking together, creating an ideal environment for kidney stones to form."

    One of those substances that will help dissolve kidney stones is POTASSIUM CITRATE.

    Talk with your doctor about taking it regularly if you're prone to kidney stones.
  • oldfart

    Posts: 328

    Mar 20, 2015 3:21 AM GMT
    Well, let me clarify: I am wondering if anyone here has *had* kidney stones *and* they also use a lot of protein supplement (like some serious bodybuilders do.)

    Not what causes them, thank you. Nor an assessment of the doc's advice; thanks anyway.

    FYI I have not; hubby did and was symptom of a prescription now changed.

    And I'd still like to hear from others who try to reach that gram-of-protein-per-pound-of-body-weight. Even with the best supplements that seems like a lot. I'm getting impressive results at maybe two thirds that level.
  • HPgeek934

    Posts: 970

    Mar 20, 2015 2:35 PM GMT
    I have had kidney stones in the past, and they suck Balls! I have never heard of protein being the culprit though. Creatine is worse for Kindney stones than protein. Also, anything that is hard to break down can cause them, things that contain seeds (breads, fruits) and sugary drinks (Orange juice, iced tea) can make them occur. For me, I have Crohn's disease and kidney stones is one of the side effects of it.
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    Mar 21, 2015 6:04 AM GMT
    oldfart saidWell, let me clarify: I am wondering if anyone here has *had* kidney stones *and* they also use a lot of protein supplement (like some serious bodybuilders do.)

    Not what causes them, thank you. Nor an assessment of the doc's advice; thanks anyway.

    FYI I have not; hubby did and was symptom of a prescription now changed.

    And I'd still like to hear from others who try to reach that gram-of-protein-per-pound-of-body-weight. Even with the best supplements that seems like a lot. I'm getting impressive results at maybe two thirds that level.

    I've had kidney stones 20 years ago. And the doctors cited the same causes I mentioned above. I was not taking bodybuilding protein supplements.

    I was told to drink more water. I rarely do. My doctors still tell me that same thing today, and have diagnosed me several times as being seriously dehydrated. I even had one doctor detain me in the office for an hour until I had a liter of saline solution put into me intravenously. I never have a sensation of thirst, must be some kind of genetic defect.
  • Breeman

    Posts: 339

    Mar 21, 2015 10:54 AM GMT
    CLTMike46 saidYou're asking us for medical advice? If I were to answer your question, then that would assume I have established a doctor-patient relationship. You could then sue me if there is a bad outcome, and I have no malpractice insurance.

    Here's my best advice: listen to your doctor.


    Doctors don't know it all. My Mother recently was misdiagnosed when her doctor gave her skin cream for the skin cancer she's had for over a year. Yes, Google is your friend and not (bro science) but the vast amount of information and people's experiences goes a long way.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4863

    Mar 22, 2015 12:39 AM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    FRE0 saidThere is considerable controversy about the cause of kidney stones. Probably there are multiple causes. A higher degree of hydration may help, but it is no guarantee.

    Correct. From the Mayo Clinic:

    Kidney stones form when your urine contains more crystal-forming substances — such as calcium, oxalate and uric acid — than the fluid in your urine can dilute. At the same time, your urine may lack substances that prevent crystals from sticking together, creating an ideal environment for kidney stones to form.

    Factors linked to kidney stones:

    http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/kidney-stones/basics/risk-factors/con-20024829


    The "Preparing for your appointment" section of the link was interesting.

    According to a woman I asked, her kidney stones were far more painful than childbirth. Obviously I can't compare the two, but when I had kidney stones, the pain was so great that it was totally disabling. So, how the Mayo Clinic can have a section on "Preparing for your appointment" don't understand. "Preparing for the ambulance to arrive" would be more appropriate. It should also include a section on how to avoid the temptation to shoot oneself to end the pain.
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    Mar 22, 2015 12:53 AM GMT
    FRE0 said
    Art_Deco said
    FRE0 saidThere is considerable controversy about the cause of kidney stones. Probably there are multiple causes. A higher degree of hydration may help, but it is no guarantee.

    Correct. From the Mayo Clinic:

    Kidney stones form when your urine contains more crystal-forming substances — such as calcium, oxalate and uric acid — than the fluid in your urine can dilute. At the same time, your urine may lack substances that prevent crystals from sticking together, creating an ideal environment for kidney stones to form.

    Factors linked to kidney stones:

    http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/kidney-stones/basics/risk-factors/con-20024829

    The "Preparing for your appointment" section of the link was interesting.

    According to a woman I asked, her kidney stones were far more painful than childbirth. Obviously I can't compare the two, but when I had kidney stones, the pain was so great that it was totally disabling. So, how the Mayo Clinic can have a section on "Preparing for your appointment" don't understand. "Preparing for the ambulance to arrive" would be more appropriate.

    I wanted to "LOL!" but I suppose that would be insensitive. Still, that was good.

    My stones gave me variable levels of pain. I can't say it was anything like childbirth, but maybe mine weren't very large, I dunno. They usually passed fairly quickly. But they did show up on hospital studies using some kind of contrast or radioactive stuff, so they definitely were there.

    I had them the worse in my 40s, but not now. Sometimes I think I feel one coming on, but it goes away, so I don't do anything medical. Except start drinking lots more water, and some cranberry juice. Which is supposed to be good for my prostate, too.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4863

    Mar 22, 2015 1:57 AM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    FRE0 said
    Art_Deco said
    FRE0 saidThere is considerable controversy about the cause of kidney stones. Probably there are multiple causes. A higher degree of hydration may help, but it is no guarantee.

    Correct. From the Mayo Clinic:

    Kidney stones form when your urine contains more crystal-forming substances — such as calcium, oxalate and uric acid — than the fluid in your urine can dilute. At the same time, your urine may lack substances that prevent crystals from sticking together, creating an ideal environment for kidney stones to form.

    Factors linked to kidney stones:

    http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/kidney-stones/basics/risk-factors/con-20024829

    The "Preparing for your appointment" section of the link was interesting.

    According to a woman I asked, her kidney stones were far more painful than childbirth. Obviously I can't compare the two, but when I had kidney stones, the pain was so great that it was totally disabling. So, how the Mayo Clinic can have a section on "Preparing for your appointment" don't understand. "Preparing for the ambulance to arrive" would be more appropriate.

    I wanted to "LOL!" but I suppose that would be insensitive. Still, that was good.

    My stones gave me variable levels of pain. I can't say it was anything like childbirth, but maybe mine weren't very large, I dunno. They usually passed fairly quickly. But they did show up on hospital studies using some kind of contrast or radioactive stuff, so they definitely were there.

    I had them the worse in my 40s, but not now. Sometimes I think I feel one coming on, but it goes away, so I don't do anything medical. Except start drinking lots more water, and some cranberry juice. Which is supposed to be good for my prostate, too.


    I've had kidney stones only once, in 1996. The pain was such that I was almost totally helpless. At the hospital, I was injected with a high-powered narcotic multiple times and my memory of that is incomplete. The pain, however, was not continuous.

    I was living in Fiji when I had the stones and the medical staff was very incompetent. I was never advised to drink a lot of water to flush the stones out. The stones were diagnosed with an IVP X-ray which requires injecting an iodine-based dye. The radiologist who did the X-ray told me that in Fiji, they just inject the full dosage but that in the U.S., they first inject a small amount to make sure that the dye will not cause anaphylactic shock, which can be fatal.

    Fortunately, the stones came out on their own. However, I found that the surgeon often operated for kidney stones even though he did not have the specialized instrument (dormia basket) for doing so and did not know that they had them in the capitol.

    IVP X-ray explained:
    http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/intravenous-pyelogram-ivp