LOSE=not win; LOOSE=not tight

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    Oct 03, 2007 8:32 PM GMT
    Get it right, because it betrays your otherwise above average intelligence.

    I finally had to say this. That is all. Thanks for reading my pet peeve.
  • Salubrious

    Posts: 420

    Oct 03, 2007 8:37 PM GMT
    I thought we already had a post about this and other spelling and grammar mistakes.
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    Oct 03, 2007 8:39 PM GMT
    Yes, but apparently it didn't help.

    Besides, some people are newer than when this last came up and don't search all the post archives before posting something of their own. I'm not new, but if you're going to point out repetitive topics, you should remember this.

    Sorry for interrupting your day, sir.
  • art_smass

    Posts: 960

    Oct 03, 2007 8:49 PM GMT
    I don't believe this topic ever gets worn out.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 03, 2007 8:52 PM GMT
    Don't you sass back to Rugger, Mr. Salubrious icon_wink.gif
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    Oct 03, 2007 9:04 PM GMT
    From Poems showing the absurdities of English spelling

    One reason why I cannot spell,
    Although I learned the rules quite well
    Is that some words like coup and through
    Sound just like threw and flue and Who;
    When oo is never spelled the same,
    The duice becomes a guessing game;
    And then I ponder over though,
    Is it spelled so, or throw, or beau,
    And bough is never bow, it's bow,
    I mean the bow that sounds like plow,
    And not the bow that sounds like row -
    The row that is pronounced like roe.
    I wonder, too, why rough and tough,
    That sound the same as gruff and muff,
    Are spelled like bough and though, for they
    Are both pronounced a different way.
    And why can't I spell trough and cough
    The same as I do scoff and golf?
    Why isn't drought spelled just like route,
    or doubt or pout or sauerkraut?
    When words all sound so much the same
    To change the spelling seems a shame.
    There is no sense - see sound like cents -
    in making such a difference
    Between the sight and sound of words;
    Each spelling rule that undergirds
    The way a word should look will fail
    And often prove to no avail
    Because exceptions will negate
    The truth of what the rule may state;
    So though I try, I still despair
    And moan and mutter "It's not fair
    That I'm held up to ridicule
    And made to look like such a fool
    When it's the spelling that's at fault.
    Let's call this nonsense to a halt."
    .........................................
    I take it you already know
    Of tough and bough and cough and dough?
    Others may stumble, but not you,
    On hiccough, thorough, lough and through?
    Well done! And now you wish, perhaps,
    To learn of less familiar traps?
    Beware of heard, a dreadful word
    That looks like beard and sounds like bird,
    And dead: it's said like bed, not bead -
    For goodness sake don't call it deed!
    Watch out for meat and great and threat
    (They rhyme with suite and straight and debt).
    A moth is not a moth in mother,
    Nor both in bother, broth in brother,
    And here is not a match for there
    Nor dear and fear for bear and pear,
    And then there's dose and rose and lose -
    Just look them up - and goose and choose,
    And cork and work and card and ward,
    And font and front and word and sword,
    And do and go and thwart and cart -
    Come, come, I've hardly made a start!
    A dreadful language? Man alive!
    I'd mastered it when I was five!
    .........................................
    We must polish the Polish furniture.
    He could lead if he would get the lead out.
    The farm was used to produce produce.
    The dump was so full that it had to refuse more refuse.
    The soldier decided to desert in the desert.
    This was a good time to present the present.
    A bass was painted on the head of the bass drum.
    When shot at, the dove dove into the bushes.
    I did not object to the object.
    The insurance was invalid for the invalid.
    The bandage was wound around the wound.
    There was a row among the oarsmen about how to row.
    They were too close to the door to close it.
    The buck does funny things when the does are present.
    They sent a sewer down to stitch the tear in the sewer line.
    To help with planting, the farmer taught his sow to sow.
    The wind was too strong to wind the sail.
    After a number of injections my jaw got number.
    Upon seeing the tear in my clothes I shed a tear.
    I had to subject the subject to a series of tests.
    How can I intimate this to my most intimate friend?
    I read it once and will read it agen
    I learned much from this learned treatise.
    I was content to note the content of the message.
    The Blessed Virgin blessed her. Blessed her richly.
    It's a bit wicked to over-trim a short wicked candle.
    If he will absent himself we mark him absent.
    I incline toward bypassing the incline.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 03, 2007 9:08 PM GMT
    While we are on the subject of pet peeves, mine is LOL.

    Stop LOLing, it's not funny. I don't need to be told something is funny. If it's funny I'll tell you. Just stop LOLing. Grrrrr.
  • MikePhilPerez

    Posts: 4357

    Oct 03, 2007 9:09 PM GMT
    Well I just weren't a very bright spark in school, in fact I never finished school, so if I spell wrong or my grammar is a bit off, please be gentleicon_redface.gif

    Mike
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    Oct 03, 2007 9:13 PM GMT
    My niece was furious for about a week, after she worked out that the spelling of her pet bovine's species should be "kao." She was sure that everyone was just being mean to her with this "cow" nonsense.
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    Oct 03, 2007 9:15 PM GMT
    From CANDIDATE FOR A PULLET SURPRISE

    Eye halve a spelling checker
    It came with my pea sea
    It plainly marques for my revue
    Miss steaks eye kin knot sea.

    Eye strike a key and type a word
    And weight four it to say
    Weather eye am wrong oar write
    It shows me strait a weigh.

    As soon as a mist ache is maid
    It nose bee fore two long
    And eye can put the error rite
    It's rare lea ever wrong.

    Eye have run this poem threw it
    Eye am shore your pleased two no
    It's letter perfect awl the weigh
    My checker tolled me sew.

    Margo Roark.
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    Oct 03, 2007 9:18 PM GMT
    Caslon,

    Anodder great poem! You crake me up! I dink you crake uz al up.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 03, 2007 9:29 PM GMT
    I am glad you found them funny
    But they aren't of my composing
    The titles blue link to the site
    from whence they were just copied
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 03, 2007 9:35 PM GMT
    This topic is to much. What's there too do about the problem? It would be nice if there was won or to solutions.
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    Oct 03, 2007 9:40 PM GMT
    Just be glad you don't come from Loughborough!

    I have seen many many yanks fail to pronounce English place names... always good for a laugh.

    Gloucester = GLOW-CHESTER in yankspeak ::chortles::

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 03, 2007 9:48 PM GMT
    Let me guess

    Loughborough: low-borrow?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 03, 2007 9:58 PM GMT
    No duckie, Luff burra

    Try Worcestershire

    Or Leicester


    lol lol lol
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 03, 2007 10:38 PM GMT
    icon_lol.gif Sine me up! icon_redface.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 03, 2007 10:41 PM GMT
    Your (sic) so picky! icon_wink.gif
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    Oct 03, 2007 11:05 PM GMT
    Leicester = Lester, I am pretty sure

    Worcestershire = Wor-cher? ....or is it like the sauce "wa-chis-shir"?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 03, 2007 11:15 PM GMT
    Depends on which Yanks Tiger, as there are several towns in the US called Gloucester and Worcester (courtesy of you know who), and none, at least to my knowledge, pronounce the end as chester. I've also seen Loughborough as a last name in the US, though here pronounced as loff, akin to loft.

    But then again I've seen people (Americans included) stumble over those Indian derived placed names as well, for instance (picking on the NorthWest): Puyallup, or Willamette, or even the pronunciation of Oregon or Spokane.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 03, 2007 11:47 PM GMT
    worcester is pronounced in a similar manner to wooster, ohio. And you're right, wrerick; some transported names *are* pronounced (at least approximately) correctly.

    I think the latter spelling is *rather* inelegant. But that's what you get from those *boorish* colonials, eh?

    Another belter: Versailles, OH. Welcome to Ver-sails!

    ;-) [Yanks: I love you all]
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    Oct 04, 2007 12:11 AM GMT
    In Newport, Rhode Island, Thames Street is pronounced thaymes.
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    Oct 04, 2007 12:16 AM GMT

    Said the horse, as he neighed a loud neigh,
    To the hound as he beighed a loud beigh,
    ..I don't like my oats,
    ..No one likes your high noats,
    So why shouldn't we both go aweigh.'
    So they did, the same deigh.

    From Rimes without reason
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    Oct 04, 2007 1:14 AM GMT
    TigerTimJust be glad you don't come from Loughborough!

    I have seen many many yanks fail to pronounce English place names... always good for a laugh.

    Gloucester = GLOW-CHESTER in yankspeak ::chortles::


    Um, Tiger - not here in New England. There is a town of the same name in Massachusetts. It is clearly pronounced "Glahstuh".
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 04, 2007 2:02 AM GMT
    You guys made my eyes bleed. icon_rolleyes.gif