When wealthy people have to "work"

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    Mar 21, 2015 10:09 PM GMT
    I thought I would share this rather, laughable karmic story with the other common folk.

    My 60 unit, west side, apartment building has been undergoing some "updates". Its obvious the owners have no clue about interior design concepts, color coordination or hiring licensed contractors except maybe for their own mansions they live in. New indoor-outdoor tile flooring was installed in all the hallways, on all floors. On my floor, I had to point out big mistakes that the contractors made to the installed floor to my apartment manager, cause they were so bad, at least obvious to me. The layout of the tiles do not match that of the rest of the building floors! My manager insisted the owners do everything on the cheap, even looks like hiring those men who hang out in front of Home Depot to do the work, I would hope building owners would hire licensed contractors, it doesn't appear to be the case in my building. That would mean they also did not pull a city building permit before doing the work. The elevator is next for overhaul, for safety reasons, hopefully they pull a permit and get professional elevator repair people. Our building is rent controlled and probably paid off so its not like the owners are going to recoup the costs except in tax breaks for upgrades or new tax assessments, if they didn't pull work permits, there wont be any new property tax assessments. icon_mad.gif

    The funny part is, when I asked my apartment manager why all of a sudden is a bunch of work being done to the building by the owners, including a recent new roof overlay. The manager said that the older family son, 40, who was taking care of the mothers several properties is moving to another state, I assume with his own family. The younger man brother, of the same mother, 30, who just finished marketing school, cant find a job here in the LA area. So the mother is insisting on the younger man "work" for his keep if he is going to continue to live at home in the affluent neighborhood Rancho Palos Verdes. (rich people icon_confused.gif) Mother has "assigned" the younger brother, 30, to care take of my building. Every bit of work done on the cheap, either he didn't learn much in school or he learned the wrong thing, or the mother is a battle ax cheap skate. Wealthy people seem to be the stingiest people on the planet. My building provides a home for many common people, I guess I should just be grateful to these rich people for their "thoughtfulness"
    that counts. icon_rolleyes.gificon_lol.gif

    Why cant I just win a huge Lottery, already. I would not be like these people icon_idea.gif


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    Mar 21, 2015 10:42 PM GMT

    Typical Rancho Palos Verdes single family homes, some larger than my entire apartment building, near the D Trump golf course icon_rolleyes.gif


    Amazing_Home+Modern_House_In_Breathtakin
    301502.jpg
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    Mar 21, 2015 10:48 PM GMT

    Hmmm, how do I get into this real estate business? I wonder who my building owner is icon_question.gif



    Trump Sells Rancho Palos Verdes Mansion
    http://www.currb.com/property/donald-trump-sold-his-rancho-palos-verdes-mansion-for-7-15-million/#4

    Donald-Trump-Yard-Steps.jpg

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    Mar 21, 2015 10:56 PM GMT
    I once lived in a slum - well, a neighborhood of once-nice old houses that had been illegally carved up into multi-unit student housing. (E.g. my "room" was an old back porch with plywood nailed over the posts.) Everything was desperately in need of repair, (e.g. furnaces didn't work and it was -20 outside.) We never could discover who owned the place.

    But... one day Tom Monaghan came walking into every house on the block, as if he owned them, and started handing out free pizzas. Circumstantial, but pretty suspicious. I'd rather have had heat that winter icon_mad.gif
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    Mar 21, 2015 11:06 PM GMT
    mindgarden saidI once lived in a slum - well, a neighborhood of once-nice old houses that had been illegally carved up into multi-unit student housing. (E.g. my "room" was an old back porch with plywood nailed over the posts.) Everything was desperately in need of repair, (e.g. furnaces didn't work and it was -20 outside.) We never could discover who owned the place.

    But... one day Tom Monaghan came walking into every house on the block, as if he owned them, and started handing out free pizzas. Circumstantial, but pretty suspicious. I'd rather have had heat that winter icon_mad.gif




    If you really, really think about it, this is how the ride on Titanic must have been, 3rd, 2nd, 1st class passengers. We still live in a world like this but its a lot less seen because "1st class" is so far removed from, "2nd and 3rd" icon_idea.gif
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    Mar 21, 2015 11:13 PM GMT
    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/22/books/review/the-age-of-acquiescence-by-steve-fraser.html?emc=edit_bk_20150320&nl=books&nlid=23077370&_r=0

    For two years running, Oxfam International has traveled to the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, to make a request: Could the superrich kindly cease devouring the world’s wealth? And while they’re at it, could they quit using “their financial might to influence public policies that favor the rich at the expense of everyone else”?

    In 2014, when Oxfam arrived in Davos, it came bearing the (then) shocking news that just 85 individuals controlled as much wealth as half of the world’s population combined. This January, that number went down to 80 individuals.

    ...

    Oxfam’s Davos guilt trip doesn’t appear in Steve Fraser’s “The Age of Acquiescence: The Life and Death of American Resistance to Organized Wealth and Power,” but these are the questions at the heart of this fascinating if at times meandering book. Fraser, a labor historian, argues that deepening economic hardship for the many, combined with “insatiable lust for excess” for the few, qualifies our era as a second Gilded Age. But while contemporary wealth stratification shares much with the age of the robber barons, the popular response does not.
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    Mar 21, 2015 11:25 PM GMT
    But some thing are relative.* My Crack Ho cousins think that I'm (undeservedly) rich and they have indoctrinated their children and grandchildren into this story, and the idea that they somehow "deserve" to own my property. A lifetime of working seven days a week and turning every dime back into the property is so far beyond their comprehension... they think that space aliens just "gave" me everything. Nor do they seem to understand that I can't give them any handouts unless I were to liquidate the property. And if I did that I'd sail away in my little boat and use the money to support myself...


    *There's a bad pun coming here, somewhere.

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    Mar 21, 2015 11:27 PM GMT
    mindgarden saidhttp://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/22/books/review/the-age-of-acquiescence-by-steve-fraser.html?emc=edit_bk_20150320&nl=books&nlid=23077370&_r=0

    For two years running, Oxfam International has traveled to the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, to make a request: Could the superrich kindly cease devouring the world’s wealth? And while they’re at it, could they quit using “their financial might to influence public policies that favor the rich at the expense of everyone else”?

    In 2014, when Oxfam arrived in Davos, it came bearing the (then) shocking news that just 85 individuals controlled as much wealth as half of the world’s population combined. This January, that number went down to 80 individuals.

    ...

    Oxfam’s Davos guilt trip doesn’t appear in Steve Fraser’s “The Age of Acquiescence: The Life and Death of American Resistance to Organized Wealth and Power,” but these are the questions at the heart of this fascinating if at times meandering book. Fraser, a labor historian, argues that deepening economic hardship for the many, combined with “insatiable lust for excess” for the few, qualifies our era as a second Gilded Age. But while contemporary wealth stratification shares much with the age of the robber barons, the popular response does not.



    icon_lol.gif, Its just ironic, even in my story, being family and working for somebody else in the upper food chain, don't mean anything. Its simple, those who have and maintain wealth, call the shots. Even in the case of family wealth, who ever this wealthy women is, who owns my building and others, can direct or instruct her own off spring otherwise she cuts off their money, talk about an over bearing mother, icon_lol.gif. Maybe this is why the older brother, 40, left the state and wanted nothing more to do with his family's fortune, under his wealthy mothers, over bearing rule. Now its the younger brothers turn, icon_lol.gif, so far, the younger brother is doing a shitty job, probably to spite his mother for giving him such menial tasks, but im sure poor family's have the same, similar dysfunction icon_lol.gif
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    Mar 22, 2015 11:47 PM GMT
    Well of course rich people are stingy. They do the bare minimum to keep the place standing and to keep the tenants from reporting them as a slumlord. Anything more than that, it will affect their bottom line.
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    Mar 23, 2015 12:21 PM GMT
    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTty0BmGvb4CDHWoLEYYSH

    Like him or not, he's spot on here.
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    Mar 23, 2015 4:45 PM GMT
    Don't be too sure about winning the lottery and not becoming like those people you mentioned. I'm not saying that you will behave exactly like those people but I used to work in finance and I've noticed that people change when they receive a huge chunk of cash. With that chunk comes a new wave of problems. Just be thankful for what you have and that you don't think like a cheapskate!
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    Mar 23, 2015 6:10 PM GMT
    Make no mistakes.

    The VERY Rich LOVE to save money.

    5 million dollars on a blue diamond is justified and no big deal.

    3 percent off on a case of WOOLITE is reason to celebrate.

    As a child My ((rather insane) Mother had a dear friend. She fell in Love with a working class Man.

    One day She gets a phone Call. She is wiped out. Everything is gone. Her (then fiancé) reassures Her everything will be OK. He can work in construction. Money is not everything. They have each other. They will work and rebuild.

    "Work?" She asks?

    I have 3 million dollars ( in 1974 money) plus My house, My furs and My jewelry.

    He just looked at He like She was nuts... Which She was..

    They remain married. And rich. Again.

    Point being money is all relative. My Stepfather always said just move the decimal point.

    My Grandfather told Me "'iMike, (He was the ONLY one I let call Me that) someone needs to clean the fish. And We all sure as hell no your not gonna do it."
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    Mar 24, 2015 1:20 AM GMT
    Meh...bitch bitch bitch. That's all you poor people do. icon_razz.gif