People Are Having Successes Later in Life

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    Mar 22, 2015 4:00 AM GMT
    NYT: Conventional wisdom holds that if you do not write your “Farewell to Arms,” paint your “Starry Night,” start the next Twitter or climb Mount Everest by young adulthood, or at least middle age, then chances are you will never do it.

    But that idea is becoming increasingly outdated as people are not only having successes later in life, but blooming in areas they never expected. Maybe they are not making millions, or wielding a brush like Rembrandt. Still, many people are discovering that the latter part of their lives can be just as (or even more) rewarding creatively, emotionally and spiritually.

    Examples of later-in-life triumphs abound. Ernestine Shepherd, for example, began bodybuilding (and running marathons) at age 56. Diana Nyad swam from Cuba to Florida at 64, after several attempts. Harland Sanders started his KFC empire in his 60s. Frank McCourt won a Pulitzer Prize for “Angela’s Ashes” when he was 66. Jurgen Schmidt, a retiree in Huntington Beach, Calif., and a Senior Masters swimmer, recently starred in a three-minute video for Speedo.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/21/your-money/finding-success-well-past-the-age-of-wunderkind.html
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    Mar 22, 2015 1:34 PM GMT
    My dad started running in his 40s and continued running for many years. He even qualified for the Boston and New York marathons. He's been my main inspiration to continue working out because he looks way younger than his contemporaries.

    At 42, I sold my house and most of my possessions and moved to NYC (a dream since I was 13) and it's been the best thing I've ever done.

    I started a brand new career at 48 and now my partner and I are forming a business together. He also inspired me to get into photography and we were both had work accepted into an exhibition a couple of years ago. I'd say it's never too late to do anything.

    The thing I've found is that I'm more willing to work as hard as possible because I know it's not going to be handed to me. I see a lot of entitled people who think everything should go their way and don't know what to do when it doesn't. Starting over at the bottom of the ladder was great for my ego and gave me the drive I needed to succeed.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14380

    Mar 22, 2015 1:57 PM GMT
    pazzy saidthat's one reason why i'm like whatever when folks talk about it's "too late" to do whatever they want in life in terms of doing something or following their dreams/passions. as long as you're alive, it's NEVER too late. folks act like if you don't make it in your 20s or 30s or don't get results right away or something doesn't come to you that you failed or should give up. the same mentality could be applied to the gym or with anything for that matter. quitters never win and winners never quit. even if you have to take a break for a year or two, get your ass back in there and do what you do until you succeed.
    I was told one time that I am getting too old to look for a new job/career and that I should just tough it out at my low wage office/mailroom clerk position even though I have been dropped from full time with benefits to part time with no benefits after 13 years in this dead end position. You are 54 and you are too old to change jobs is what they said to me. I thought to myself, what baseless bullshit. But this "you are too old" mentality and beliefs has poisoned the minds of countless thousands of people myself included.icon_sad.gif
  • ChicagoSteve

    Posts: 1279

    Mar 22, 2015 8:46 PM GMT
    I firmly believe it's never too late to try anything, or take a different path. The hardest part is hearing the negativity that is sent your way by family(mostly) saying you are too old. This happened to me when I was talking to one of my older brothers about my interest in trying acting. I was immediately shot down and even my sister-in-law said to me, "don't you think it's a little late for that?". The very next month I saw a posting about casting for a TV episode that was being filmed in Chicago. I already had professional pictures done at that point. I sent in my photo and literally 2 hours later my cell phone rang. It was a woman in the casting department of the TV show. She told me they really liked my headshot and thought I would be perfect for one of the detective roles they were casting for an upcoming episode. Filming it was a blast! And when the episode aired on television about 6 weeks later, it was a surreal experience. Especially since I had been a fan of the show before that. It is NEVER too late, don't let anyone tell you otherwise.
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    Mar 23, 2015 3:24 AM GMT
    woodsmen saidNYT: Conventional wisdom holds that if you do not write your “Farewell to Arms,” paint your “Starry Night,” start the next Twitter or climb Mount Everest by young adulthood, or at least middle age, then chances are you will never do it.

    But that idea is becoming increasingly outdated as people are not only having successes later in life, but blooming in areas they never expected.
    ...
    Examples of later-in-life triumphs abound. ...
    Here's another example:

    I started mountain biking at age 39. By age 40, I got into downhill freeride mountain biking (FMB). Now I'm hitting some stuff that most guys in their teens and 20's won't even dream of.

    I always heard it was "downhill" after 40. Little did I realize it would be this fun! icon_biggrin.gif