As Job Rates Rise for Everyone, Older Workers Left Behind

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 28, 2015 4:56 AM GMT
    NYT: An AARP group surveyed 2,492 people ages 45 to 70 who had been unemployed and found about half had managed to find work.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/28/your-money/study-finds-older-workers-often-missing-from-rising-job-rate.html?ref=business
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Mar 30, 2015 7:28 PM GMT
    That is exactly why I object to lowering the retirement age. Many people are retired not because they want to be, but rather, because of the difficulty of finding suitable employment when over 50 or so. Of course many older people are able to stay employed, Warren Buffet for example, but that is not possible for everyone.
  • conservativej...

    Posts: 2465

    Mar 31, 2015 6:30 PM GMT
    This is one I have never been quite able to understand. Today, with the level of automation possible even in the most menial work, there is no advantage to be under, let's say 30. I operate business in 163 countries. In each location where I have direct influence, i.e. significant management control, it is the older folks with the depth of knowledge you need onboard.
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    Mar 31, 2015 6:33 PM GMT
    I think ageism is a disease in USA. In other countries they are valued for their seasoned experience.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Mar 31, 2015 7:29 PM GMT
    There are some jobs where age can actually be a significant disadvantage once a person begins to experience real physical limitations. That is true of jobs which require considerable manual work, such as construction. On the other hand, that may not be true of jobs for which a high degree of physical fitness is not required.

    I've suggested to people that do physical work, such as landscaping, construction, etc., that that's fine for a while, but they are much more likely to become disabled than people doing jobs where physical ability is less important. For example, if a truck driver breaks his right arm, he cannot work until he has recovered whereas a broken right arm would not prevent many professional engineers from working efficiently.

    Arthritis is common among older people. Generally arthritis would be only a minor problem where little physical effort is required, but it could make it impossible for a landscaper to work.

    These things do have a bearing on the employability of older people and perhaps should be considered when choosing a career.
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    Apr 01, 2015 5:18 AM GMT
    conservativejock saidThis is one I have never been quite able to understand. Today, with the level of automation possible even in the most menial work, there is no advantage to be under, let's say 30. I operate business in 163 countries. In each location where I have direct influence, i.e. significant management control, it is the older folks with the depth of knowledge you need onboard.



    But this is not the objective of current corporate business practices.

    The #1 objective of the current business climate is profit margins
    The #2 objective of the current business climate is cheap labor
    The #3 objective of the current business climate is deregulate everything


    Labor used to be considered an asset. That asset being the knowledge. Labor is now a commodity, a reported expense. The last few decades, business and corporations lead by conservative, republican "values", have traded-in long term expensive labor (the knowledge) for short term cheap labor (the profits $ cash). Deregulation has helped the business climate cut corners (cheap materials) and cheat (tax breaks) which leads to objectives #1 & #2

    The above three objectives sound a bit like business in China, doesn't it? icon_rolleyes.gif