When friends are spreading (potential) misinformation about food..

  • Kitschy

    Posts: 16

    Mar 29, 2015 3:06 AM GMT
    I have a friend who...I think might be caught in the clutches of the health conspiracy people?

    Like, she just sent an article written by a doctor who lost his license and many of his credentials a while back.

    Would you...say anything? On one hand, I don't want to seem like the pretentious asshole that causes a rift because he thinks he knows better (and she might not listen anyways), but on the other hand...If I was going to listen to advice from a sketchy person...I would hope that someone would notify me.
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    Mar 29, 2015 3:10 AM GMT
    I lost 80 lbs between 2009 and 2011, and have kept it off ever since by following REAL science of nutrition (and moderate-to-extreme exercise, depending on my mood).

    So yes, I would say (and have said) something to my out-of-shape friends who try to give me mainstream nutrition advice.

    I'd be willing to bet your friend is out of shape.
  • Kitschy

    Posts: 16

    Mar 29, 2015 3:21 AM GMT
    Yeah, they aren't really...in the best shape.

    It's just this weird "Wake up sheeple" mentality that unnerves me.
  • mybud

    Posts: 11832

    Mar 29, 2015 3:26 AM GMT
    Friends don't hold back.. I'd want my friend to tell it to me straight.
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    Mar 29, 2015 3:59 PM GMT
    It depends on how reasonable a person your friend is. If you show them the notice of the doctor being discredited and losing his license and they continue to believe the material anyway, then you're going to have to leave them be. Some people don't want to hear the truth if it conflicts with their own beliefs and you an't waste too much of your time/patience trying to persuade them otherwise.

    Aside: Nice XJ, OP
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    Mar 29, 2015 4:31 PM GMT
    It's a slippery slope cus everything that was reputable science 40 years ago is now know as bad science. Read about the huge low fat diet fraud . Or the one nutritionists that warned about the government's adoption of Trans -fat .
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    Mar 29, 2015 4:35 PM GMT
    Kitschy saidI have a friend who...I think might be caught in the clutches of the health conspiracy people?

    Like, she just sent an article written by a doctor who lost his license and many of his credentials a while back..

    So what was this article about that your friend sent? What examples of misinformation do you have?
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    Mar 29, 2015 5:01 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    Kitschy saidI have a friend who...I think might be caught in the clutches of the health conspiracy people?

    Like, she just sent an article written by a doctor who lost his license and many of his credentials a while back..

    So what was this article about that your friend sent? What examples of misinformation do you have?


    Yeah, there's a lot of ambiguity in the original post. So I'm wondering if the article was about nutrition or specific types of food and why is it a conspiracy versus misinformation?
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    Mar 29, 2015 8:10 PM GMT
    Erik101 said
    Art_Deco said
    Kitschy saidI have a friend who...I think might be caught in the clutches of the health conspiracy people?
    Like, she just sent an article written by a doctor who lost his license and many of his credentials a while back..
    So what was this article about that your friend sent? What examples of misinformation do you have?
    Yeah, there's a lot of ambiguity in the original post. So I'm wondering if the article was about nutrition or specific types of food and why is it a conspiracy versus misinformation?

    It would be funny if the article is about the paleo diet or gluten free.
  • BLSHJ

    Posts: 36

    Mar 29, 2015 8:21 PM GMT
    In the end, you have to do your own home work.
    But PLEASE don't get into the habit of believing "due to authority".

    I am rather hesitant to share my stories at the moment but sometimes, "mainstream" idea of medicine and food can be far from the truth.

    The point is you have to do your own research.
  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    Mar 29, 2015 11:18 PM GMT
    Go to dinner with someone else.
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    Mar 30, 2015 1:04 AM GMT
    Everyone has their own truth and ignores the advice of well-meaning (and often misinformed) people. Your friend should be used to that.

  • Import

    Posts: 7190

    Mar 30, 2015 1:05 AM GMT
    who fucking cares bro?

    Let the dumb bitch think what she wants. Just make sure that YOU stay skinny and cute and that dumb bitch can do whatever the fuck she ewants with her misinformation.

    She'll eventually figure out she's a brain dead fucking moron.
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    Mar 30, 2015 1:08 AM GMT
    Import - Keepin' shit real.
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    Mar 30, 2015 1:14 PM GMT
    Why would you be afraid to discuss something as basic as food with your friends? Questioning an article she found on the internet makes you a pretentious asshole and causes a rift between you? If she has no problem sending you this stuff, I don't see why you should be afraid to discuss it with her.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4864

    Mar 30, 2015 7:14 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    Kitschy saidI have a friend who...I think might be caught in the clutches of the health conspiracy people?

    Like, she just sent an article written by a doctor who lost his license and many of his credentials a while back..

    So what was this article about that your friend sent? What examples of misinformation do you have?


    Like you, I prefer knowing the exact sources when they are available. Often that is possible by including links.

    Regarding nutrition, there are many hair-brained unsubstantiated theories. There are those who believe that all of us should avoid wheat. Some assert that canola oil causes cancer. Regardless of what one eats, there are those who will assert that it is dangerous.

    It is likely that we don't all have the same dietary requirements.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4864

    Mar 30, 2015 7:15 PM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal said
    Erik101 said
    Art_Deco said
    Kitschy saidI have a friend who...I think might be caught in the clutches of the health conspiracy people?
    Like, she just sent an article written by a doctor who lost his license and many of his credentials a while back..
    So what was this article about that your friend sent? What examples of misinformation do you have?
    Yeah, there's a lot of ambiguity in the original post. So I'm wondering if the article was about nutrition or specific types of food and why is it a conspiracy versus misinformation?

    It would be funny if the article is about the paleo diet or gluten free.


    Gluten free makes good sense for the 1% or so who are sensitive to gluten, but for most of us, avoiding gluten makes no sense. The same is true with peanuts and probably some other foods as well.
  • bobbobbob

    Posts: 2812

    Mar 30, 2015 7:22 PM GMT
    It's a slippery slope...

    They start out spreading bullshit about food... and the next thing you know...

    They are spreading bullshit about you and everyone else they know...

    then they move up to spreading shit about politics, saying things they just make up and can't prove, calling people names, making accusations about them and never offering one bit or evidence to back up anything they say...

    Most of these nasty queens eventually grow 40 inch waists to hide their dicks, and try get us to believe the skirts they wear are from Scotland.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4864

    Mar 30, 2015 7:22 PM GMT
    BLSHJ saidIn the end, you have to do your own home work.
    But PLEASE don't get into the habit of believing "due to authority".

    I am rather hesitant to share my stories at the moment but sometimes, "mainstream" idea of medicine and food can be far from the truth.

    The point is you have to do your own research.


    Quite so, but doing one's own research is not easy. It requires being able to evaluate the reliability of various sources; some people completely lack the ability to do that. Even those of us with the ability can sometimes be misled.

    A problem with the Internet is that just about anyone can establish a web site and fill it with disinformation. When visiting a website, one must try to establish the credibility of those who sponsor it. It can help to read several articles on the website and see whether they seem to be based on facts resulting from good research. The number of sources which state the same opinion is not a good indicator of reliability since they may all be getting their "information" from the same unreliable source.
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    Mar 30, 2015 7:26 PM GMT
    FRE0 said
    BLSHJ saidIn the end, you have to do your own home work.
    But PLEASE don't get into the habit of believing "due to authority".
    I am rather hesitant to share my stories at the moment but sometimes, "mainstream" idea of medicine and food can be far from the truth.
    The point is you have to do your own research.
    Quite so, but doing one's own research is not easy. It requires being able to evaluate the reliability of various sources; some people completely lack the ability to do that. Even those of us with the ability can sometimes be misled.
    A problem with the Internet is that just about anyone can establish a web site and fill it with disinformation. When visiting a website, one must try to establish the credibility of those who sponsor it. It can help to read several articles on the website and see whether they seem to be based on facts resulting from good research. The number of sources which state the same opinion is not a good indicator of reliability since they may all be getting their "information" from the same unreliable source.

    So true. Along the same lines, it's also easy for reporters to report on something and not understand what they're talking about and provide all sorts of nonsense. (And it's their job to sound confident as if they know what they're talking about.) I'm always disappointed when people treat the news media like it's some sort of utter truth.
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    Mar 30, 2015 8:00 PM GMT
    bobbobbob saidIt's a slippery slope...

    They start out spreading bullshit about food... and the next thing you know...

    They are spreading bullshit about you and everyone else they know...

    then they move up to spreading shit about politics, saying things they just make up and can't prove, calling people names, making accusations about them and never offering one bit or evidence to back up anything they say...

    Most of these nasty queens eventually grow 40 inch waists to hide their dicks, and try get us to believe the skirts they wear are from Scotland.


    K5.jpg

    nuff said!?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 30, 2015 10:39 PM GMT
    Kitschy saidI have a friend who...I think might be caught in the clutches of the health conspiracy people?

    Like, she just sent an article written by a doctor who lost his license and many of his credentials a while back.

    Would you...say anything? On one hand, I don't want to seem like the pretentious asshole that causes a rift because he thinks he knows better (and she might not listen anyways), but on the other hand...If I was going to listen to advice from a sketchy person...I would hope that someone would notify me.


    mmm, I wouldn't bother- unless the information they are posting are faulty and dangerous ( for example, like saying trans fat is a good fat to eat) then I don't see why it would matter.
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    Mar 31, 2015 12:50 AM GMT
    Reminds me of the time I told my curly, long haired friend that chunky peanut butter would make her hair soft and manageable! It took her days of shampooing to get the oil out of her hair!

    Food misinformation can be fun!
  • Svnw688

    Posts: 3350

    Apr 01, 2015 2:29 PM GMT
    You've been a member for 4 days
    You have no profile
    You have no pics
    You're unverified
    And you used the word "sheeple."

    You're a troll and a sock account.

    Now, substantively if you were a real person, which you are NOT, then I would answer 'the truth--at least as you perceive it--is always the best policy.'