Will I grow muscle with this gym routine?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 05, 2015 5:11 PM GMT
    I started a gym 2 weeks ago, and so far have been 4 times.

    I'm interested for now in working my upperbody, to a point where I am noticably bigger when wearing a T-shirt.

    I have been using the machine type equipment only:

    - Shoulder Press
    - Pec thingy
    - Pull down thingy
    - Push up thingy


    At first I thought I noticed a difference, but then I wasn't so sure. I decided to help aid my development via using a muscle growth drink called Sci-Mx X-Plode Hardcore Orange 400G

    You can read about it here --> http://www.tesco.com/groceries/product/details/?id=274754477

    I'm not sure if that will actually make a difference.

    I last about 30 minutes at the gym and can lift 30/35kg weighs on the machines I said. I lift and release it steadily for 8 goes, wait 90 seconds then do it again usually 3 times in total before moving to the next machine.

    I last until I'm physically shaking from pushing myself. My arms feel tight and sore, but after a few hours there is no 'pain' but they are still weak.

    My questions are:

    Am I doing enough? - I literally go until I am shaking trying to lift again and have no energy.

    Will I make any gains this way?

    How long do you think it will take me to have obvious changes?

    No pain no gain? - If I'm not in pain with my arms or sore, have I not worked out enough?


    Thanks!
    icon_eek.gif
  • jeepguySD

    Posts: 651

    Apr 05, 2015 11:55 PM GMT
    When I first starting lifting (properly) I gained 15 lbs of muscle in 6 months...a total of 30 lbs in the first year.

    You can make gains using machines, but you might get better results using free weights, *if* you use proper form.

    If your goal is to bulk up, then you should NOT do circuit training (working everything every time you go to the gym). Instead, isolate muscle groups on dedicated days. As a beginner you might start with 1 day for chest/tris, 1 day for back/bis, and one day for legs. As you make gains, add a day for shoulders, and finally add a day for just arms (bis and tris).

    Good form is essential. Start with 3 or 4 exercises per muscle group, 3 sets of 8-10 reps, failing on the final rep of each set. Also, EAT. If you don't feed your body it cannot grow. I cannot eat enough so I have to use protein shakes as a supplement.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 06, 2015 12:39 AM GMT
    jeepguySD saidWhen I first starting lifting (properly) I gained 15 lbs of muscle in 6 month...a total of 30 lbs in the first year.

    You can make gains using machines, but you might get better results using free weights, *if* you use proper form.

    If your goal is bulk up, then you should NOT do circuit training (working everything every time you go to the gym). Instead, isolate muscle groups on dedicated days. As a beginner you might start with 1 day for chest/tris, 1 day for back/bis, and one day for legs. As you make gains, add a day for shoulders, and finally add a day for just arms (bis and tris).

    Good form is essential. Start with 3 or 4 exercises per muscle group, 3 sets of 8-10 reps, failing on the final rep of each set. Also, EAT. If you don't feed your body it cannot grow.

    There is nothing wrong with doing full body workouts for achieving hypertrophy (bulking up), say 3-4 times per week. Not sure if that is what you are referring to by "circuit training".

    http://www.t-nation.com/article/bodybuilding/totalbody_training

    https://www.t-nation.com/workouts/lift-3-days-a-week-and-grow

    http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance/full_body_vs_split_training

    https://www.t-nation.com/training/full-body-workouts-of-the-legends

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 06, 2015 5:20 AM GMT
    My advice to you is to first focus on form. Whether with machines, cables or free weights, you need to lift the right way. It will help you hit the right muscles the right way, and that will cause growth.

    During that process you can learn the names for the different exercises, and which muscles they hit.

    Being so new, anything you do with regards to weigh lifting will cause you to gain muscle as long as you're eating a healthy diet with a bit of lean towards protein. Adding a simple protein shake should help. I personally prefer dairy free ones, but go with what you like.

    After that I'd suggest you check out some books on lifting. I personally love The New Rules of Lifting, but it's plans call for deadlifts, squats, cleans and a few other big compound lifts, which can take a while to learn.

    The most important thing is to start trying to get informed, keep hitting the gym, and figure out what you enjoy and what your body responds best to. After that it's about finding programs and information that teaches you more about what you love doing.
  • DCEric

    Posts: 3713

    Apr 06, 2015 3:39 PM GMT
    robbaker saidAll bull the only way these true bodybuilders jocks grows is through a cycle of steroids!icon_rolleyes.gif

    how_about_no_evil.jpg
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 06, 2015 7:16 PM GMT
    Hey OP. First congratulations for getting to the gym. Further congrats on making it to they gym regularly thing. Big ups to you for wanting to get bigger. Don't let anything or anyone discourage your wonderful new behaviors. Keep doing those thingies you mentioned. No need to spend a bunch of money on macho-powders, yet. Do the thingies. You will grow. I promise.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4862

    Apr 06, 2015 7:33 PM GMT
    You really don't need dietary supplements unless your diet is deficient. When I took up weight lifting the first time, my strength rapidly increased and I gained weight without supplements.

    To save time, I did a full workout three times per week. For some exercises, machines work better than free weights, for example the lat pull-down although you could do chin-ups while wearing a weight belt instead. At one time, I could do 22 chin-ups as the result of doing lat pull-downs. Although my weight at the time was about 140#, I was using 210# for the lat pull downs, 3 sets, up to 10 repetitions on the first set. There was a padded T-bar on the floor to make it possible to use more than one's body weight.

    You don't mention doing anything for your biceps. Although the lat pull down does affect the biceps, it would be more effective to do curls after exercising your lats. If you use a straight bar bell for curls, you could experience elbow problems. It is best to have the palms turned together somewhat to prevent that.

    When I started weight lifting, it was not known that doing full squats was unwise. Before I stopped doing squats, I was doing full squats, 10 repetitions, at 265# even though I weighed only 140#. I stopped as the result of knee problems.

    Probably in no more than three months, if you work out diligently, your appearance will change sufficiently that when you are wearing a T shirt or just a bathing suit, you will receive comments.
  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4433

    Apr 06, 2015 8:10 PM GMT
    Congrats on getting to the gym. What you're doing is fine including the reps and sets (try to do 3 all the time). Just keep moving the weight up as it gets easier, which will happen fast when you first start working out. But I'd change two things: add some bicep and tricep exercises, and stop using the drink when you're done with what you've bought. Instead, get a good whey protein powder and drink that right after to feed the muscles. At least 40 grams and no more than 100 calories.

    As you get used to working out, try to increase your frequency to 3 or 4 times/week and see if you can increase to about an hour. Meanwhile, buy a book that shows lots of standard exercises by body part. I keep it in the trunk of my car and look at it at lunch if eating alone. Then try to work up to 3 or 4 different exercises per body part: shoulders, chest, back arms, legs. And learn dumbbells. You can do anything with them that you can do on a machine and they don't have the risk of the olympic bar. The reason is that forces your left to get equal to your right which looks better and is also healthier. Imbalance of development can cause all sorts of problems.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 07, 2015 4:40 PM GMT
    Any new kind of lifting activity should grow muscle given you're replenishing your body with the intake required, and you don't have muscular atrophy. I gained around fifteen pounds by doing new a new routine, after a while that same routine plateaued me.

    You always have to try new things and work new muscles to gain mass, eventually your body gets used certain activities and almost negates the getting sore process I find, which is pivotal for muscle growth.

    Looking at your routine objectively, it's good for part of a weekly routine, but it's best alternate routines either weekly or even daily/bi daily depending how many days a week you work out. Ideally working out almost every day intensely on a few muscle groups is good for me I find. But I always say give your body at least 1 or 2 days off minimum/week unless you're training for something.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 07, 2015 11:08 PM GMT
    Eat, lift, eat, sleep, repeat.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 07, 2015 11:08 PM GMT


    Proteins
    Eggs
    White Fish
    codfish,
    tilapia,
    swordfish,
    tuna,
    salmon
    Beef
    Pork
    Chicken


    Carbs
    Sweet Potatoes
    Brown Rice
    Oatmeal
    Quinoa
    Pumpkin
    Spelt
    White Potatoes
    White rice
    Grits/polenta


    Greens
    Green Beans
    Spinach
    Kale
    Lettuce
    Broccoli
    Brussel Sprouts
    Any green leaf vegetable

    Fruits
    Berries any kind
    Tomatoes
    Cantaloupe
    Apple
    Peach


    Fats
    Fish oil
    Cod liver oil
    Nuts
    Olives

    Focus first on food. Keep a food journal and a training journal. A simple notebook is sufficient. Write it down. After 12-15 weeks review. Then consider adding supplements. I hope this helps.
  • Beeftastic

    Posts: 1747

    Apr 08, 2015 12:30 AM GMT
    Your natural build is really not bad at all judging by your pics. This means that almost any decent work out routine will probably give you results. Just be consistent, and regular, and learn to eat like a body builder.

    Free weights are definitely superior to machines, but if you use machines right, they can get you some results.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4862

    Apr 08, 2015 6:18 AM GMT
    jimib said

    Proteins
    Eggs
    White Fish
    codfish,
    tilapia,
    swordfish,
    tuna,
    salmon
    Beef
    Pork
    Chicken


    Carbs
    Sweet Potatoes
    Brown Rice
    Oatmeal
    Quinoa
    Pumpkin
    Spelt
    White Potatoes
    White rice
    Grits/polenta


    Greens
    Green Beans
    Spinach
    Kale
    Lettuce
    Broccoli
    Brussel Sprouts
    Any green leaf vegetable

    Fruits
    Berries any kind
    Tomatoes
    Cantaloupe
    Apple
    Peach


    Fats
    Fish oil
    Cod liver oil
    Nuts
    Olives

    Focus first on food. Keep a food journal and a training journal. A simple notebook is sufficient. Write it down. After 12-15 weeks review. Then consider adding supplements. I hope this helps.


    It is possible to do very well on a vegetarian diet.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 08, 2015 2:22 PM GMT
    Tom8521 saidGREAT!

    Also, if I'm lifting weights, should i be warming up first?

    I've been going in and getting straight on with things, but now i wonder... Should i jog first or something? Remember,I don't want to lose any weight though!


    A light stretch is usually good to prepare muscle growth.
  • Goodluckyman

    Posts: 104

    Apr 08, 2015 4:50 PM GMT
    Great ideas......
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Apr 09, 2015 3:56 PM GMT
    Thingy
    Stopped reading there.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4862

    Apr 09, 2015 8:26 PM GMT
    Tom8521 saidGREAT!

    Also, if I'm lifting weights, should i be warming up first?

    I've been going in and getting straight on with things, but now i wonder... Should i jog first or something? Remember,I don't want to lose any weight though!


    Aerobic exercise is good and except if carried to extremes, is not incompatible with increasing strength. Running a mile requires only 100 calories anyway. If you are fit, running a mile at a moderate pace will not tire you and would be a good way to warm up, but just for warming up, there is no reason to run farther than that. If you want to increase your running fitness, run longer distances on other days.