Tonite: The Ten Commandments on ABC!

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    Apr 05, 2015 11:53 PM GMT
    Watch Charlton Heston raise his Ramses!
    Yul Brynner rue the day he shaved his head!
    Anne Baxter purr over her "great, big, beautiful fool Moses!"
    Dame Judith Anderson guard her secret unto her death!
    Vincent Price crack his wicked whip!
    Edgar G. Robinson weasel his way into power!
    John Derek scurry down ropes in all his sinuhe glory!
    Gershom ask the Four Questions at the first Seder!
    Yvonne DeCarlo lay guilt trips w/ the best of 'em!
    The newly-freed Hebrews kvetch over their Schlep out of Egypt!
    And God do what He does best!

    Completely over the top, miscast in many roles, and static direction as only CB DeMille could paste on film. But, great fun and a nice way to end the weekend!
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    Apr 06, 2015 12:13 AM GMT
    https://www.aclu.org/using-religion-discriminate
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    Apr 06, 2015 2:12 AM GMT
    theantijock saidhttps://www.aclu.org/using-religion-discriminate
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    Anne Baxter: "Moses, Moses, Moses!"

    One of the campiest lines of all times. From an otherwise excellent actor.

    The problem with DeMille was he was a great director of scenic spectacles. But he was a dreadful director of actors for sound movies. He was locked in the silent film era, and his actors illustrate it. Even the great Edgar G. Robinson suffers under his direction.

    He had already filmed the Ten Commandments for the silent screen, and he was repeating himself. Only this time with wide-screen, Technicolor, and sound.

    But if you take the sound away, and view it in B&W, all that's lacking are the dialogue cards on the screen. It's really a silent movie in every other respect.

    The sound is secondary & auxiliary, it's an entirely visual movie. With exaggerated acting that would have worked in the silent days, but combined with dialogue just becomes comical camp.