Trout Fishing Destroying Environment

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 11, 2015 6:25 AM GMT
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    NYT: I quit when I saw the environmental damage hatcheries cause.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/11/opinion/the-cost-of-trout-fishing.html?ref=opinion
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    Apr 12, 2015 5:54 AM GMT
    And here I was happily anticipating the start of fishing season and the first trip to my local stream that is indeed stocked. icon_sad.gif

    Thank you for posting this, because I had no idea of the damage done in order to get those nice trout. I guess I'll let the fly rods collect dust unless I'm going somewhere to fish "native" trout.
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    Apr 12, 2015 3:42 PM GMT
    This is a revelation; thanks for posting it.

    I DO wish that we encouraged more active culling of invasive species by hunting a/o trapping, not by chemical-based government programs. My two nominees for extermination are the Asian carp, which has already infested the Mississippi's tributaries, and the crow, which believe it or not is actually a protected species. The former is a nasty, brutish fish that threatens to destroy the Great Lakes' ecosystem, and the latter is now found everywhere across the US, in cities and farmlands, where it drives out native songbirds and generally becomes a loud and obnoxious pest. Certain Indian tribes hold it sacred, which is fine; let it be protected on their lands only, which, collectively, are by no means small in size, and hunted aggressively elsewhere.

    That said, I look forward to nabbing some yellow perch up in WI and MI this summer, but I will certainly read up on their state of being before I do.
  • bobbobbob

    Posts: 2812

    Apr 12, 2015 7:46 PM GMT
    MGINSD saidThis is a revelation; thanks for posting it.

    I DO wish that we encouraged more active culling of invasive species by hunting a/o trapping, not by chemical-based government programs. My two nominees for extermination are the Asian carp, which has already infested the Mississippi's tributaries, and the crow, which believe it or not is actually a protected species. The former is a nasty, brutish fish that threatens to destroy the Great Lakes' ecosystem, and the latter is now found everywhere across the US, in cities and farmlands, where it drives out native songbirds and generally becomes a loud and obnoxious pest. Certain Indian tribes hold it sacred, which is fine; let it be protected on their lands only, which, collectively, are by no means small in size, and hunted aggressively elsewhere.

    That said, I look forward to nabbing some yellow perch up in WI and MI this summer, but I will certainly read up on their state of being before I do.


    Crows aren't an invasive or significantly destructive species in the US.
    Why not deal with non-native invasive species that have been documented in causing damage? You named Asian Carp and that's one for the list...

    Honey Bees were brought from Europe. Their presence in the US has had a minimal effect on bees native to the US since, not even in the wild, are they competing with European Honey Bees for sites to make hives. No native bee species live in colonies the size of Honey Bees. However once honey bees were established in the wild they were in direct competition with native mammals and birds who depended on nesting sites that were also perfect for bee colonies. Honey bees have been determined as a factor that led to the extinction of the Carolina Parakeets.

    Goddamned Starlings and Sparrows In the later 1800s Starlings were brought to the US and released in Central Park NYC, by a friggin idiot only because they are mentioned in the works of Shakespeare and he thought trading species of plants and animals between continents was a good idea. Estimates of their damage to food crops, fruit trees, property, and air travel runs into the mid millions. They directly compete with at least twenty native bird species for nesting sites and they are known carriers of diseases to livestock. Every spring we have to fight sparrows and starlings attempting to make nests in every possible niche at my home and business. On metal buildings I encourage people to use fire on nests as they're discovered.

    Sparrows were brought from England in the mid 1800s to help eat caterpillars off trees in New England. Like Starlings, they are in competition for nesting sites and food with native species.

    Canada Geese a relatively new invader to the US that has spread rapidly, competing with native waterfowl.

    European Green Crabs. They eat scallops and clams. They need to die.


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    Apr 12, 2015 8:23 PM GMT
    woodsmen said11Spano-sfSpan.jpg

    Actually that's not how you fly fish for trout. Other fish, perhaps, but whoever did that cartoon needs to do some research.

    flyfishing_zps5iap0jgh.jpg

    You do it like this, casting your hollow line out onto the water to float. Your fly rests on the surface, where the trout sees it. Eating insects on the water surface is one of the trout's natural means of feeding.
  • FredMG

    Posts: 988

    Apr 14, 2015 1:23 AM GMT
    It's part of a bigger meme: wanting to do what "grand-pappy" did just doesn't work, any more, too many people. This goes for fishing trout, or cutting down trees.
  • bobbobbob

    Posts: 2812

    Apr 14, 2015 2:04 AM GMT
    woodsmen said11Spano-sfSpan.jpg

    Actually that's not how you fly fish for trout. Other fish, perhaps, but whoever did that cartoon needs to do some research.

    flyfishing_zps5iap0jgh.jpg

    Art_Deco said
    You do it like this, casting your hollow line out onto the water to float. Your fly rests on the surface, where the trout sees it. Eating insects on the water surface is one of the trout's natural means of feeding.


    No. That's not how you do it. You haven't done fly fishing have you?

    There's no such thing as hollow fly line. It would be too weak and stretchy to bring in large fish.

    Half the fly line sold is designed to sink, not float.

    There are more sinking flies made and sold than floating flies
    nymphs, streamers, clousers, wet flies are just a few.

    I've fly fished for 50 years freshwater, saltwater and everywhere I go.