Pollen Season

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 18, 2015 4:39 PM GMT
    I'm dying here. Anybody have any suggestions for over the counter meds that work best, home remedies, etc? Somebody told me to take off all my clothes when I entered my house but he might be a pervert.
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    Apr 18, 2015 6:01 PM GMT
    Well, a shower does help. As does aerobic exercise. At least temporarily.

    So far, I've been resisting the drugs this year - only had a couple of sniffly days. (The roses in the greenhouse are blooming like crazy today. Smells great! AhhhCHO!)

    Zyrtec(cetirizine) for daily use. Benadryl (diphenhydramine) if things get out of hand. Or really, generic equivalents thereof.
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    Apr 18, 2015 6:13 PM GMT
    Here's what my doctor sent out earlier this year:

    Lumpy's doctor saidThis time of the year, many people may suffer from seasonal allergies or “Hay Fever.” Your John Muir Health physician would like to provide you with tips on what you can do to minimize the effects you may experience:

    1) Avoid or reduce exposure to the allergen as much as you can. Stay indoors on hot windy days of pollen season. Keep windows and doors closed; including car windows if you are commuting when pollen is at its worse (typically between 5 AM – 10 AM). Use an air conditioner with an electrostatic filter. Wear sunglasses to help keep pollen out of your eyes.

    2) Seek relief from an over-the-counter (OTC) treatment. Some treatments may be used in combination with another. You should always consult your physician if you are not sure which treatments are best for you. Since some of the treatments interfere with other medications or disease states, if you have not already discussed with your doctor, make an appointment to review. If you are pregnant or breastfeeding it is best to consult your physician as to what OTC medications are safe to use.

    - Nasal saline sprays and rinses can help reduce swelling and clear excess mucous. These are non-medicated and very safe for all ages.

    - Nasal steroids, such as Flonase and Nasonex, can be used to reduce inflammation in the nasal and sinus passageways, and may even help eye symptoms.

    - Antihistamines, such as Claritin, Zyrtec, and Allegra, are considered non-drowsy and may work for more variety of symptoms like itchiness along with nasal symptoms.

    - Decongestants can help to relieve swelling. However, they are not generally recommended for children or people with high blood pressure, heart disease, or vascular problems.
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    Apr 18, 2015 7:45 PM GMT
    I've done allergy shots twice and they were effective on me. Once as a kid and then again in my 40s. The last time around has lasted a good long time though not quite as effective as the first round but I'd say a 90% improvement, so, well worth it.

    But since relocating I've developed other reactions, our bad season was a few months back and I wound up with a sinus infection which I've never had before. So on top of already having shots, I've incorporated during season Claritin but more importantly nasal wash (my brother uses a neti pot, I just buy a generic saline spray) and some sort of Flonase which is a steroid that closes up those receptors. You don't use that if you've an infection because it can then exacerbate the problem, so instead use it before getting infected, or as getting rid of infection if also on an antibio, and then it can keep you from getting further infected besides opening passageways for breathing.

    Also change your clothing and shower at night to remove pollen that's landed on you during the day.

    Be real careful of using decongestant sprays. They are addictive to the body whereby your passageways will close up unless they get their fix. So use as directed. I think it is two to three days in a row max and then lay off it for a while.
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    Apr 18, 2015 7:58 PM GMT
    I take generic Zyrtec and so far this year I haven't had any problems. I'm also not an outdoorsy person...

  • mybud

    Posts: 11837

    Apr 18, 2015 9:25 PM GMT
    Flonase...amazing stuff 120 doses for about 25 dollars...
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    Apr 19, 2015 9:41 AM GMT
    DefensiveEnd saidI'm dying here. Anybody have any suggestions for over the counter meds that work best, home remedies, etc? Somebody told me to take off all my clothes when I entered my house but he might be a pervert.


    I don’t think he was being a pervert; pollen will stick to your clothes and hair, to keep the pollen out of your living space and bedroom it’s best to strip down and take a shower to get rid of any pollen that may be on your body. Also, you might want to try a Neti Pot to flush your nasal passages.
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    Apr 19, 2015 12:58 PM GMT
    mybud saidFlonase...amazing stuff 120 doses for about 25 dollars...


    This.
  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4435

    Apr 19, 2015 6:25 PM GMT
    I used to get hey fever twice/year, sometimes bad enough to warrant a visit to my doc. And sometimes I'd feel semi-bad for months. But nothing much helped and I didn't like the feeling I'd get from prescription meds. So I've been trying two things.

    One is get some locally made honey and down a tablespoon of it once a day (I do it first thing in the morning and also give the dogs a spoonful). Local and current season is necessary for it to contain the local pollens that you want to teach your body to repel so check out the location of the hives, frequency of inventory turnover, etc. This worked for me. No more meds! My body will sometimes catch a hey fever reaction but it seems prepared and within a day or two max I'm fine. I've essentially been free of hey fever for 3-4 years now after fighting it for decades. Nothing more than sensitivity training.

    The other is something I've only been doing lately but was recommended by a friend in med school: Olive tree leaf extract. Not hard to find and cheap. Don't know if it is doing anything because I haven't had a hey fever bout for a while but figure olive oil is supposed to be so good for you that this can't hurt.

    Good luck!
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    Apr 19, 2015 7:29 PM GMT
    TPM1 said
    DefensiveEnd saidSomebody told me to take off all my clothes when I entered my house but he might be a pervert.
    I don’t think he was being a pervert

    Unless he offered to help him take off all of his clothes.
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    Apr 19, 2015 11:42 PM GMT
    OK, Here's what not to do. Take the top and doors off your jeep and bomb down the interstate, into the wind, which just shifted 180°. Pull out into the passing lane and BAM, you can't see. icon_surprised.gif

    Maybe those little old ladies tossed a teargas grenade across into my back seat?

    All right, tomorrow I'll start the zyrtec.


    Not as bad as when I used to come home from skool in May and have to start cutting hay. It was like getting maced every night icon_cry.gif
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    Apr 19, 2015 11:47 PM GMT
    Thanks men. I'm trying the flonase first because it was on sale at Target. But it's raining hard so that might be the best relief.
  • tennsjock

    Posts: 349

    Apr 19, 2015 11:58 PM GMT
    I recommend a scientific approach. Assume that everybody's body is different, and different antihistamines work for different people. Then the challenge is finding which antihistamine works for you. Many of them are also non-drowsy, or they may be non-drowsy for you but not for other people. Try each of these for a week (only one at a time so you can isolate which one works best):

    * chlorpheneramine (chlor-trimeton)
    * clemastine fumarate (tavist-d)
    * fexofenadine (allegra)
    * loratidine (claritin)
    * cetrizine (zyrtec)
    * diphenhydramine (benadryl, drowsy)
    * doxylamine (Nyquil, drowsy)

    Everyone's body is different. Allegra works well for me, but chlorpheneramine works best for my partner. Benadryl works for both of us to a lesser extent -- doesn't make me drowsy, but knocks out my partner.
  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4435

    Apr 20, 2015 12:36 AM GMT
    tennsjock saidI recommend a scientific approach. Assume that everybody's body is different, and different antihistamines work for different people. Then the challenge is finding which antihistamine works for you. Many of them are also non-drowsy, or they may be non-drowsy for you but not for other people. Try each of these for a week (only one at a time so you can isolate which one works best):

    * chlorpheneramine (chlor-trimeton)
    * clemastine fumarate (tavist-d)
    * fexofenadine (allegra)
    * loratidine (claritin)
    * cetrizine (zyrtec)
    * diphenhydramine (benadryl, drowsy)
    * doxylamine (Nyquil, drowsy)

    Everyone's body is different. Allegra works well for me, but chlorpheneramine works best for my partner. Benadryl works for both of us to a lesser extent -- doesn't make me drowsy, but knocks out my partner.

    Ya, funny how different our chemistry can be. I guess it has some basis in what we were exposed to when very young and our response mechanisms were developing. It almost seems like you're better off being exposed to all kinds of nasties when very young, like less than 2. Anyone know current science on this?