Is it just as effective working out across 2 days instead of 1.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 03, 2015 9:45 PM GMT
    Is it more effective to work the upper body in one same day instead of several?

    I currently struggle to do:

    Chest,
    Arms,
    Shoulders,
    Back.

    Would it be just as effective if i spread them over 2 days?
    Let's say:


    Monday:
    Chest,
    Arms.

    Tuesday:
    Shoulders,
    Back.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 04, 2015 4:59 AM GMT
    In my experience, yes. That's the only way I workout, because I use a bicycle to commute AND to have fun with, so I'm always pedaling...never a day off from cardio. The only way to mix in strength training is to break it up into smaller segments or I could easily overtrain accidentally.
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    May 05, 2015 12:29 PM GMT
    Whatever your body feels comfortable with, you should do that.
    There isn't some exact science here.
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    May 18, 2015 4:11 AM GMT
    Everything has drawbacks. If you do AB, you have more days between workouts to rest and recover, but if you do AB you will stay longer in the gym and possibly create a bigger damage to recover from. You will also have to calibrate your diet to resist the burnout of the long workouts characteristic of AB schemes.

    If you do ABC, ABCD or ABCDE you can reduce the time you stay in the gym and this is good for ectos, but at the same time you will have less days between workouts to recover (assuming you want to do the same workouts in the same days of the week)

    And let's not forget that bodybuilding is a tripod of training + diet + recovery, you need to do all of them correctly to see results, which is why it makes little sense to talk about the effectiveness of one or another training regime if your diet sucks.
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    Feb 26, 2016 11:23 PM GMT
    I would advise giving each body part its own day. That way you can focus on just that one body part and make sure you are effectively completely exhausting that muscle group. If you try to do several muscle groups all in one day, you're either going to be lifting for three hours (which is not advisable) or not fully exhausting each of those muscle groups.
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    Feb 27, 2016 8:40 PM GMT
    thenes saidI would advise giving each body part its own day. That way you can focus on just that one body part and make sure you are effectively completely exhausting that muscle group. If you try to do several muscle groups all in one day, you're either going to be lifting for three hours (which is not advisable) or not fully exhausting each of those muscle groups.


    That's my strategy too, though sometimes i do combine chest with biceps, back with triceps, and shoulders with core since they don't overlap as much. Legs get their own day of hell.
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    Mar 08, 2016 1:24 AM GMT
    javelin7 said
    thenes saidI would advise giving each body part its own day. That way you can focus on just that one body part and make sure you are effectively completely exhausting that muscle group. If you try to do several muscle groups all in one day, you're either going to be lifting for three hours (which is not advisable) or not fully exhausting each of those muscle groups.


    That's my strategy too, though sometimes i do combine chest with biceps, back with triceps, and shoulders with core since they don't overlap as much. Legs get their own day of hell.


    That's basically what I'm currently doing.

    Day One: bis/tris
    Day Two: back/chest
    Day Three: legs/shoulders
    Day Four: bis/tris
    Day Five: back/chest
    Day Six: legs/shoulders
    Day Seven: rest

    But I only recommend matching up two muscle groups for a workout for people who are experienced and have learned how to properly exhaust a muscle group.
  • buddycat

    Posts: 1874

    Mar 12, 2016 10:53 AM GMT
    I do back and biceps one day and chest, triceps, and shoulders the next. When you do your back, you also work your biceps and when you do bench or flys, you also work your shoulders and biceps. I through in leg press here and there but do cardio everyday so I use my legs thee.
  • Triggerman

    Posts: 528

    Mar 19, 2016 2:20 AM GMT
    I train people and I think the upper body/lower body split doesn't work. Too many things to do in the time limit of the body's energy. There are really three areas. Upper body including arms, shoulders, chest and upper back. Core including abs and their antagonists in the lower back, and then legs. Your upper body and lower body are mirror images of each other. Calf/ forearm, hamstring/bicep, quad/tricep, glutes/shoulders. Unless you are advanced, I think each area should get it's own day. Otherwise, nothing gets worked hard enough for real growth. This is for beginners and intermediates. Three days a week: upper, lower, and core. Advanced guys can do push/pull, upper/lower, all the more advanced routines. But, I see too many beginners trying to copy routines they saw in a magazine ghostwritten for some advanced bodybuilder and getting frustrated.

    But if you are in the gym lifting iron, you are on the right path.

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    Mar 20, 2016 5:09 PM GMT
    bachian saidEverything has drawbacks. If you do AB, you have more days between workouts to rest and recover, but if you do AB you will stay longer in the gym and possibly create a bigger damage to recover from. You will also have to calibrate your diet to resist the burnout of the long workouts characteristic of AB schemes.

    If you do ABC, ABCD or ABCDE you can reduce the time you stay in the gym and this is good for ectos, but at the same time you will have less days between workouts to recover (assuming you want to do the same workouts in the same days of the week)

    And let's not forget that bodybuilding is a tripod of training + diet + recovery, you need to do all of them correctly to see results, which is why it makes little sense to talk about the effectiveness of one or another training regime if your diet sucks.



    ∆ This. I laugh when I hear guys in the gym giving workout advice and 90% of it's incorrect. I certainly don't know it all but I'm careful not to spread information unless I know it's factual (or at least had personal experience with.) Each person is so different in how our bodies react to exercise, food and rest. For me personally, I've found where I lack the most is in the area of rest. I love to workout every day but it's not the most productive thing to do because I end up getting sick and losing my motivation.

    I would love to pick your brain again about diet. Your body is amazing.
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    Mar 23, 2016 9:54 PM GMT
    I have struggled with doing 5-6 days of workout per week. Either I didn't have enough energy or I got injured when I tried to do 5-6 days of workout. I try to workout 4, max 5 days a week. Yeah, it could be the case that my diet isn't good enough or other factors. So it really depends on you, how much your body can recover and how do you feel while working out.
  • Hypertrophile

    Posts: 1021

    Mar 29, 2016 3:56 PM GMT
    I don't think it's possible to train a muscle group properly more than once per week. Especially if training for strength or size. This requires training to true failure. If you don't give that muscle group enough time to recover, your won't be able to meet the other requirement which is to add weight, or at least do more reps, on your next workout. Of course, everyone is different, and your recovery ability has a lot to do with how well trained you are already, how good your diet and rest are as has been mentioned up thread, and whether your are on performance enhancing drugs. Some hard gainers report that a given muscle group needs even more than a week between bouts of exercise. One natural bodybuilder I follow on YouTube claims ten days rest between arm workouts, for example.

    That all said, no matter what body parts you are training on a given day, you are also putting stress on the rest of your systems, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, etc. These also require a rest period to recover. IMO, the average trainee should workout no more than two days in a row, otherwise you will quickly enter into an overtrained situation. In my case, even with proper recovery, I find that I start to develop symptoms of overtraining if I don't take a week long break at least every twelve weeks. Sometimes more often. Otherwise I start losing motivation, having trouble sleeping, etc. If I push it too far, I end up losing all motivation and dread getting back to the gym after what has become a forced layoff. If I notice the slightest onset of overtraining, I take a week off and spend it anxiously awaiting my next workout.
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    Apr 04, 2016 11:40 PM GMT
    Hypertrophile saidI don't think it's possible to train a muscle group properly more than once per week. Especially if training for strength or size. This requires training to true failure. If you don't give that muscle group enough time to recover, your won't be able to meet the other requirement which is to add weight, or at least do more reps, on your next workout.

    You typically only need 72 hours to recover, but I find that I am fully recovered in under 48 hours.

    Hypertrophile saidOne natural bodybuilder I follow on YouTube

    I promise you that if this person is legit bodybuilder sized, they are not "natural", at least not as the public typically understands that word. ;)
  • Hypertrophile

    Posts: 1021

    Apr 06, 2016 2:55 PM GMT
    jackedgamer said
    Hypertrophile saidI don't think it's possible to train a muscle group properly more than once per week. Especially if training for strength or size. This requires training to true failure. If you don't give that muscle group enough time to recover, your won't be able to meet the other requirement which is to add weight, or at least do more reps, on your next workout.

    You typically only need 72 hours to recover, but I find that I am fully recovered in under 48 hours.

    Hypertrophile saidOne natural bodybuilder I follow on YouTube

    I promise you that if this person is legit bodybuilder sized, they are not "natural", at least not as the public typically understands that word. ;)


    I recently tried doing an extra bicep workout and found that with only three days in between, the workout suffered. I may have to look at my split to see if adjusting that can help. But at my age I think I need the extra time.

    I am interested to know more about recovery. Is there anything you're doing diet or supplement-wise to improve recovery ability? In addition to the ton of food I eat every day, including 3 or 4 protein shakes, I add BCAA's and Creatine, and lately I've been trying ZMA, which of the three seems to be the least effective. I'm also focusing on trying to get more sleep. Anything you recommend?

    If the bodybuilder I'm referring to was using AAS, he could easily train more frequently than he does, and he would be a lot bigger than he is. I've followed him since he was a teen and his gains have been slow and steady, with no period of rapid growth I would associate with AAS, especially with the intensity level he maintains in the gym. He is big, no doubt, but doesn't have the mass to compete at the national level. I wouldn't be surprised however if he was what I would call an "OTC natural", meaning he probably also uses creatine, BCAA's, Glutamine, NO Boosters, etc.
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    Apr 09, 2016 12:31 AM GMT
    Hypertrophile said

    I recently tried doing an extra bicep workout and found that with only three days in between, the workout suffered. I may have to look at my split to see if adjusting that can help. But at my age I think I need the extra time.


    I would look at your nutrition. You might not be getting enough protein and or carbs. But maybe it is an age thing: maybe as you get older it takes longer for the muscle to repair itself? That's not something I've ever read, but I wouldn't be surprised if that was the case.

    If the bodybuilder I'm referring to was using AAS, he could easily train more frequently than he does, and he would be a lot bigger than he is. I've followed him since he was a teen and his gains have been slow and steady, with no period of rapid growth I would associate with AAS, especially with the intensity level he maintains in the gym. He is big, no doubt, but doesn't have the mass to compete at the national level.

    That's an irrational way of determining whether someone is natty or not. I'm acquinted with several guys who, looking at them, you wouldn't assume they use AAS, but are. They don't look the typical super-massive roided out bodybuilder size, they are "men's physique comp" level at best. But they use them, and have for years. Why aren't they massive? Because they don't train often enough or hard enough or long enough, and I bet their nutrition is shit. AAS doesn't just magically turn a guy into a massive beast if his nutrition is shit.
  • Hypertrophile

    Posts: 1021

    Apr 10, 2016 6:56 PM GMT
    jackedgamer said
    Hypertrophile said

    I recently tried doing an extra bicep workout and found that with only three days in between, the workout suffered. I may have to look at my split to see if adjusting that can help. But at my age I think I need the extra time.


    I would look at your nutrition. You might not be getting enough protein and or carbs. But maybe it is an age thing: maybe as you get older it takes longer for the muscle to repair itself? That's not something I've ever read, but I wouldn't be surprised if that was the case.

    If the bodybuilder I'm referring to was using AAS, he could easily train more frequently than he does, and he would be a lot bigger than he is. I've followed him since he was a teen and his gains have been slow and steady, with no period of rapid growth I would associate with AAS, especially with the intensity level he maintains in the gym. He is big, no doubt, but doesn't have the mass to compete at the national level.

    That's an irrational way of determining whether someone is natty or not. I'm acquinted with several guys who, looking at them, you wouldn't assume they use AAS, but are. They don't look the typical super-massive roided out bodybuilder size, they are "men's physique comp" level at best. But they use them, and have for years. Why aren't they massive? Because they don't train often enough or hard enough or long enough, and I bet their nutrition is shit. AAS doesn't just magically turn a guy into a massive beast if his nutrition is shit.


    Suffice to say that I have better than average understanding about AAS. I know that a lot of people think of them as the easy way out, when in fact part of why they work is they allow you to work harder and more often.

    Thanks for your input in regards to my situation, I've been gradually bumping up my calories and protein and currently taking in about 4000 cal/day, and about 350g protein. I strive to take in about 50g protein every meal. Most of the rest of my calories are carbs, mostly sweet potatoes, brown rice, and oats. I don't worry about fats at all, except I add some coconut oil to my protein shakes to help bump up the calories a bit. My weigh-in yesterday only showed a minimal gain for the week, so I'm going to step up the calories, again.

    I think my bigger problem is sleep, which I'm only able to get about six hours a night. It's not from a lack of trying. My body wakes up at 4am every day and there's little I can do after that except get up and get going.
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    Apr 11, 2016 10:11 PM GMT
    Hypertrophile said

    I think my bigger problem is sleep, which I'm only able to get about six hours a night. It's not from a lack of trying. My body wakes up at 4am every day and there's little I can do after that except get up and get going.


    Go to bed earlier? Or take a sleep aid?

    Sounds like your nutrition is pretty decent. So long as you're getting 2g of protein per pound you weigh, you'll do fine.
  • jackp0t

    Posts: 50

    Apr 18, 2016 10:50 PM GMT
    Yes
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    Apr 26, 2016 4:44 AM GMT
    Too many unknowns and variables to consider to give a really good response, save an actual conversation. But, there're some helpful tips and suggestions in the thread (a few unhelpful/incorrect things too I think a few pointed out already).
  • jrc2005

    Posts: 74

    May 14, 2016 11:53 AM GMT
    jackedgamer saidI would advise giving each body part its own day. That way you can focus on just that one body part and make sure you are effectively completely exhausting that muscle group. If you try to do several muscle groups all in one day, you're either going to be lifting for three hours (which is not advisable) or not fully exhausting each of those muscle groups.


    For me, each body part with its own day is the only thing that's worked for me. And I also throw in a quick exhaustion set of another body part at the end. My split that has been giving me results lately:

    1. Chest (throw in exhaustion set of tris at end; short ab workout at end)

    2. Back incl. lower back (one week focus on pullup-type moves, the other week focus on row-type moves) (throw in exhaustion set of bis at end)

    3. Arms and abs

    4. Shoulders (throw in exhaustion set of chest at end)

    5. Legs (throw in exhaustion set of back at end)