Is It Ordinary Memory Loss, or Alzheimer’s Disease?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 19, 2015 2:40 PM GMT
    NYT: Have a full-blown neuropsychological assessment — two days of tests of her cognitive abilities. The dozen measures included I.Q. and memory scales, auditory learning and animal naming tests, an oral word association test, a connect-the-dots trail-making test, and a test of the ability to copy complex figures.

    These tests determine if everything is in the normal range for your age.

    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/05/18/tests-can-answer-fears-about-dementia/?ref=health&_r=0
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 20, 2015 3:10 PM GMT
    An older friend, near 80 & still quite active with her tai chi & community involvement, got tested a few months ago at a major Alzheimer's research facility. Up until then she'd been frequently questioning her status though I told her that I thought she was functioning fine. Being the main caregiver for my mom during her many years of Alzheimer's, I can practically spot someone with it from a mile away. But my friend naturally needed the science and her results did allay her fears. She'd bring up her suspicions frequently beforehand yet hasn't mentioned it since.

    So testing has that benefit to re-instill some confidence. My mother got tested very early, though with bad news and she availed herself to studies and almost to experimentation only wasn't qualified at that time for what otherwise looked interesting. Turns out good thing. Because some participants wound up dying from the study which was then immediately halted.

    I have another friend who suffers dementia, self inflicted, though. And another friend just yesterday mentioned it. He's got what they call wet brain or this...

    [url]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wernicke%E2%80%93Korsakoff_syndrome[/url]

    ...from his drinking and recently lost his very responsible position by that. He's got an excellent pension so no money worries and he's one of the nicest guys you'd ever meet, but we can't get him to stop drinking. It's weird too because otherwise he stays in excellent shape. Goes to gym always & he's a runner. But when not doing that, he's drinking.

    It's especially tough for me, having lost a loved one to dementia, having another person who I love inflict dementia upon himself and concerned about getting it one day myself. Life is not easy.

    But this is another reason why we have to change our attitudes about suicide. Because population has aged like it never did previously. Not that some didn't live into oldest age 1000s of years ago, but more are living until then now.

    le02.gif

    With that comes issues of sufferings, expenses, nursing home abuses, loss of quality of life, etc. that religions didn't know to consider 1000s of years ago. Because with advanced age come these numerous health problems that humanity hasn't had to deal with at this level of intensity before now. We simply didn't have a lot of dementia because not a lot of people lived into their 70s and 80s. So this just comes with the territory.

    Obsolescent religious morals based upon shorter life expectancies are not adequate to appropriately guide us.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 20, 2015 4:45 PM GMT
    woodsmen saidNYT: Have a full-blown neuropsychological assessment — two days of tests of her cognitive abilities. The dozen measures included I.Q. and memory scales, auditory learning and animal naming tests, an oral word association test, a connect-the-dots trail-making test, and a test of the ability to copy complex figures.

    These tests determine if everything is in the normal range for your age.

    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/05/18/tests-can-answer-fears-about-dementia/?ref=health&_r=0

    Any memory change should be examined. And also try to isolate what kind of memory is becoming deficient. There is short-term memory and long-term memory. My long-term memory has always been spectacularly good, my short-term memory spectacularly poor.

    The short-term memory deficiencies are most likely due to all my head trauma, which date back decades. But so far at 66 there's no recent change.

    Nor does it run in my family, I believe another predicator of mental deterioration with age. Those who made it well into their 80s remained mentally sharp to the very end.

    I never saw any of my family demonstrate senility, or even simple memory loss, much less have Alzheimer's. I'm keeping my fingers crossed (if I can remember where I put them).