SNAP Benefits May Cover Protein Powders!!!

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 19, 2015 7:59 PM GMT
    So, like many Americans, I receive SNAP benefits through the state. Trust me, if you are eligible - even for a short time... you should enroll. Anyway, I was curious about something: Can my EBT card pay for some supplements, specifically the protein powder I consume regularly? As it turns out... perhaps yes. It all depends on the labeling. If the protein powder has a "Nutritional Label" it will be covered by SNAP (aka. Food Stamps) If the protein powder has a "Supplemental Label" the FDA does not recognize it as a food product and therefor not covered by SNAP.

    Now the kicker: I can't find any powders online with a 'Nutritional Label' opposed to a 'Supplemental Label'

    Perhaps we should pool our minds and compile a list of such products, as I'm sure I'm not the only fitness nut on food stamps icon_smile.gif

    What do ya say gang... shall we?
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    May 19, 2015 10:43 PM GMT
    I say that if they do then its a travesty. Qualifying for financial assistance means you should need it to survive, not so that you can have a little more wiggle room or buy things you otherwise couldn't afford but don't actually need.
  • BAHBAA

    Posts: 122

    May 19, 2015 11:20 PM GMT
    Life2Short saidI say that if they do then its a travesty. Qualifying for financial assistance means you should need it to survive, not so that you can have a little more wiggle room or buy things you otherwise couldn't afford but don't actually need.


    This.

    And people wonder why the rest of us are tired of paying for these programs.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 20, 2015 1:32 AM GMT
    I think the best bet is to check the protein powders available in your grocery store for use with EBT.

    I don't know your circumstances so no judgement here. Best of luck to you bud.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 20, 2015 4:30 AM GMT
    BAHBAA said
    Life2Short saidI say that if they do then its a travesty. Qualifying for financial assistance means you should need it to survive, not so that you can have a little more wiggle room or buy things you otherwise couldn't afford but don't actually need.


    This.

    And people wonder why the rest of us are tired of paying for these programs.


    You are in error.

    A person would be better off with

    MAX.jpg

    Than with sandwich meat.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 20, 2015 4:34 AM GMT
    I also like these:

    chickensrirachabar.png

    lambcurrantmintbar.png
  • jjguy05

    Posts: 459

    May 20, 2015 5:42 AM GMT
    MikeKrieger saidSo, like many Americans, I receive SNAP benefits through the state. Trust me, if you are eligible - even for a short time... you should enroll. Anyway, I was curious about something: Can my EBT card pay for some supplements, specifically the protein powder I consume regularly? As it turns out... perhaps yes. It all depends on the labeling. If the protein powder has a "Nutritional Label" it will be covered by SNAP (aka. Food Stamps) If the protein powder has a "Supplemental Label" the FDA does not recognize it as a food product and therefor not covered by SNAP.

    Now the kicker: I can't find any powders online with a 'Nutritional Label' opposed to a 'Supplemental Label'

    Perhaps we should pool our minds and compile a list of such products, as I'm sure I'm not the only fitness nut on food stamps icon_smile.gif

    What do ya say gang... shall we?



    We bitch about people on food stamps, which costs us a few dollars a year, but we don't complain about corporate welfare, which costs us thousands.

    Anyways,

    Protein powder is food. People think protein powders are magic medicines. And the fact that we call them "supplements" adds to this misconception. They're just food. They're derived from milk. And unless you're buying expensive isolated whey, they can actually be more economical than chicken. Casein protein is a byproduct of cheese making, and they used to throw it away. It's really good, slow-digesting protein. For $30, you can buy a bottle that has like 25 servings of 25 grams each at Vitamin Shoppe (store brand). Even better when they have them on sale for buy one, get second half off.

    Although it's not adviseable, you can theoretically live off of only protein powder instead of chicken or beans or eggs for your protein intake. If you spend your food stamps on protein powder, then you may not be able to afford chicken or eggs, so there's a trade-off. So, either way, you won't be able to afford much food total (protein powders included), unless you're somehow able to reduce the amount of money you spend on housing or transportation.


    Since you're severely constrained by money, you'll have to limit yourself to cheap forms of protein, which could very well include casein if you find it at a good price. Obviously, beef and salmon will have to be out of the question, or at least very occasional. Cheaper proteins could be a combination of both animal-derived (chicken, eggs, dairy products, and casein powders) and plant-based (beans and lentils). Lentils are a superfood, because they combine both protein and slow-digesting carbs. And they're super-cheap while also super-healthy and very physique-friendly. So, teach yourself to make lentil soup.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 20, 2015 3:53 PM GMT
    StephenOABC, jjguy05, TomSOCAL:

    Thank you guys for saving this thread from the TROLLS!

    You all made good points. Protein Powder is a FOOD!
    Some people pick on Social programs but tuck their heads into their asses when corporations get huge kickbacks and bailouts. Typical Corporatism brainwashing.

    Anyway... as for me having any kind of condition. Negative - I do have a very high metabolic rate, like a teenager. My blood sugar is generally on the low end so I don't have the same carbohydrate storage most people have. I burn through nutrients like a solar flare. That said, in lieu of carrying around a cupboard's worth of tuna cans and chicken breasts in my gym bad, and going through two dozen eggs a week, I drink protein shakes on top of a more manageable intake of food.

    As for work. I work on a farm and contract at an aerospace firm on the side. The way SNAP benefits work, is you get a given amount per month based on your income. The truth is, anyone who's monthly income is at or less than $1,265, is entitled to assistance. And with all the cuts and restrictions made to the program over the years, that threshold is a vetted and well debated hard line. It's not like people are gaming the system and getting a handout.

    Point - if these FOX news robots don't like people getting any kind of public assistance, they should go live in the 19th Century! Hauling bricks and coal all day long to pay off their debts to the company who built the shack they and their entire family live in. We live in a more humane society now and by gosh... it works a hell of a lot better than centuries past.
  • jjguy05

    Posts: 459

    May 20, 2015 9:05 PM GMT
    MikeKrieger said if these FOX news robots don't like people getting any kind of public assistance, they should go live in the 19th Century!


    I'm gonna let you in on a little secret: they all take public assistance too. They just don't like it when others get it.
  • monet

    Posts: 1093

    May 21, 2015 3:24 AM GMT
    My elderly mother needs supplemental protein in her diet. Her SNAP benefits cover Muscle Milk but not Ensure.

    image_24212_original_X_450_white.jpg

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 21, 2015 3:31 AM GMT
    @jjguy05

    Excellent insight! I always wondered why whey is considered a supplement if both cheese and whey are byproducts of the same process.
  • jjguy05

    Posts: 459

    May 21, 2015 6:21 AM GMT
    I want to make this clear to everyone reading this: we're not talking about ways to cheat the system. Protein powder is food. It's just another form of dairy, and although it's colloquially called a "supplement", this description is inaccurate.

    For guys trying to put on weight and eat x amount of meals a day, the protein shake counts as a meal, since it contains nutrients and calories. It's food.

    bachian said@jjguy05

    Excellent insight! I always wondered why whey is considered a supplement if both cheese and whey are byproducts of the same process.


    Yep, they're both milk-derived. Casein is the more abundant of the two in milk. That might by why it's cheaper. That, and the fact that casein hasn't gone mainstream yet the way whey has (only serious lifters buy casein) so low demand may also be a part of it. Plus, isolated whey goes through a refinement process that probably adds to the cost. My primary protein powder is casein, because it digests slowly. For me, whey is only for the peri-workout period. icon_biggrin.gif

    Last but not least, look at the cholesterol count on the bottle. Some folks are now starting to say that we don't need to be as obsessed with dietary cholesterol as we've been, provided we get our vegetables and nutrients...but just in case, I pay attention to the cholesterol levels on my casein bottle. The Vitamin-Shoppe store brand Micellar Casein is low in cholesterol.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 21, 2015 6:41 AM GMT
    Powdered skimmed milk (protein powder) has always been available through these programs. Even back in the 60's. Mom used to trade junk food for those "bulk commodities" that her relatives received but wouldn't eat.
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    May 21, 2015 7:37 AM GMT
    Life2Short saidI say that if they do then its a travesty. Qualifying for financial assistance means you should need it to survive, not so that you can have a little more wiggle room or buy things you otherwise couldn't afford but don't actually need.


    This coming from a guy milking all the benefits of living in a WELFARE STATE. For every $1.00 he pays in federal taxes, he gets $1.10 back in LA. For every $1.00 I pay, I get $0.91 back. This guy should show the rest of us some gratitude rather than bitching about a brother of ours trying to get the best bang for his buck. And don't even get me started on the corporate welfare we provide to the Oil Industry in that state, which isn't even factored into these figures.

    http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2011/11/states-federal-taxes-spending-charts-maps
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 21, 2015 2:31 PM GMT
    There used to be a convenience store a block from me that would take food stamps for beer, cigs, weed, spice, and even guns.

    Too bad it got raided and shut down. icon_lol.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 01, 2015 3:10 PM GMT
    SNAP should cover protein powders. We all have an interest in providing healthier foods to any of our fellow citizens who need food assistance.
  • Jeepguy2

    Posts: 164

    Jun 02, 2015 1:04 AM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    FitnessWorker saidSNAP should cover protein powders. We all have an interest in providing healthier foods to any of our fellow citizens who need food assistance.


    SNAP covers junk food like soda, cookies and potato chips, right? It's really dumb that a healthier option such as protein powder isn't covered yet you can buy diabetes 2 stimulating junk.


    Food Stamps, SNAP, or whatever the Feds are calling it now, is not and never has been about helping the poor. It is a subsidy program for Big Agri, which is why it covers junk food like corn chips, tortillas, and sodas that are loaded with High fructose corn syrup, but not organics. Some states don't even have an asset test for SNAP. Pretty much anyone who is out of work or retired can qualify.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 02, 2015 11:09 PM GMT
    I think protein powders being covered by food stamps makes absolute sense since they're a cheap, easily prepared and easily digestible source of protein. They're a good alternative for people who can't afford meat. Oh, *SNAP* !