Mapping the Hourly Wage Needed to Rent a 2-Bedroom Apartment in Every U.S. State

  • metta

    Posts: 39144

    May 28, 2015 8:22 PM GMT
    Mapping the Hourly Wage Needed to Rent a 2-Bedroom Apartment in Every U.S. State


    http://www.citylab.com/housing/2015/05/mapping-the-hourly-wage-needed-to-rent-a-2-bedroom-apartment-in-every-us-state/394142/
  • Svnw688

    Posts: 3350

    May 28, 2015 9:15 PM GMT
    That's really sad, and precisely why we need a national 10 or 11 dollar minimum wage, with specifics states or more likely cities offering higher rates.

    No person should work fulltime and be relatively poor.
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    May 30, 2015 2:26 PM GMT
    Breaking it down by State is a bit misleading though. NYC is outrageously expensive but upstate is not. You can purchase a house for under 100K in Rochester.
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    May 30, 2015 10:50 PM GMT
    Lower than I was expecting but maybe my perspective is skewed as a Canadian that works in a technical position. That being said, I couldn't imagine living in Vancouver or Toronto making less than $30/h... makes me question how a lot of people get by in NYC or big cities in Cali.
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    May 31, 2015 12:51 PM GMT
    TomSOCAL saidMap is flawed.

    The average monthly rent in Nevada is $900 monthly.

    So if you work 30 hours a week X 10 dollars an hour = $300 a week.

    With four weeks per month. you're making $1200 a month.

    That leaves $300 for food and gas. You can get by. [...]


    Whoa--wait--what the hell??

    First, blame me for not reading all your post and the one after, but after I started seeing big pictures I thought you were advertising or something, but:
    $1200 earnings - $900 rent = $300 food/gas = "Good Enough"?

    The shit you talking about?! What about medical insurance, car insurance--fucking hell, what happens when there's a mechanical issue and you need to get the truck fixed, but oh no, it's a radiator issue! There goes $200 to replace it! Or a computer? $200! What about families with children--the cost of essential baby products is fucking insane!

    What about loans from school, a phone bill, other bills--any kind of emergency that might strike without warning? The point I'm trying to make is SAVINGS. Sure, you can cut down that $300 and put a few dollars away, but how quickly is it going to add up if things don't go perfect 100% of the time, and someone is forced to cut into that emergency money? What happens when there is no emergency money?
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    May 31, 2015 1:15 PM GMT

    Hmmm...without rent controls any wage increase can be snapped up with rent increases. This is what is happening in Canada.

    Even WITH rent controls, our Conservative Provincial gov't is now wanting to raise rent caps now that minimum wage has gone up 2 dollars an hour. (don't be fooled by their Liberal title; the Conservs crossed the floor when their own Party failed and did a hostile takeover of the Liberal Party, which was still new. We never had a Liberal Party provincially before.)

    If the rentals in your State have no rent controls, you will see an immediate and swift response to a minimum wage increase, landing these renters right in the same boat they were before.

  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    May 31, 2015 7:03 PM GMT
    At one time, the average man could, while working on only one job, adequately support a wife and children and have a nice two bedroom house. Now usually both husband and wife have to work.
  • YBNB

    Posts: 28

    May 31, 2015 11:49 PM GMT
    And nj is one of the highest
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    Jun 01, 2015 2:25 AM GMT
    TomSOCAL saidMap is flawed.

    The average monthly rent in Nevada is $900 monthly.

    So if you work 30 hours a week X 10 dollars an hour = $300 a week.

    With four weeks per month. you're making $1200 a month.

    That leaves $300 for food and gas. You can get by.
    What about transportation, electric, water, gas, internet, and phone? Those are also essentials to live and keep a job.